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  1. Being a Celebrity: A Phenomenology of Fame.David Giles & Donna Rockwell - 2009 - Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 40 (2):178-210.
    The experience of being famous was investigated through interviews with 15 well-known American celebrities. The interviews detail the existential parameters of being famous in contemporary culture. Research participants were celebrities in various societal categories: government, law, business, publishing, sports, music, film, television news and entertainment. Phenomenological analysis was used to examine textural and structural relationship-to-world themes of fame and celebrity. The study found that in relation to self, being famous leads to loss of privacy, entitization, demanding expectations, gratification of ego (...)
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  2. Editorial: Research in Sport Climbing.Stefan Künzell, Jiri Balas, Vanesa España-Romero, David Giles & Pierre Legreneur - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
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    Phenomenologically Researching the Lecturer-Student Teacher Relationship: Some Challenges Encountered.David Giles - 2009 - Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 9 (2):1-11.
    The teacher-student relationship has long been of primary concern to educators and the focus of much educational research. While various theoretical understandings of this relationship exist, ontological understandings of the lived experiences of this relationship are not so prevalent, and there is thus a call for phenomenological studies aimed at uncovering the essential and ontological meanings of this taken for granted phenomenon. This paper reports on such a project and, in particular, some of the challenges encountered in the process of (...)
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    Retrospective Accounts of Drunken Behaviour: Implications for Theories of Self, Memory and the Discursive Construction of Identity.David Giles - 1999 - Discourse Studies 1 (4):387-403.
    This article examines the retrospective accounts of drunken behaviour by groups of students who drink together regularly. The literature on `collective remembering' has demonstrated how shared memories are constructed discursively, and this is likely to be even more true of memories for events when participants were drunk. Close reading of the extracts from one particular interview reveals the way participants construct `drunken identities' for one another, and suggests how they may embroider narrative recollections through subsequent information becoming available to supplement (...)
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