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David Ciavatta [13]David V. Ciavatta [4]
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  1.  18
    Embodied Meaning in Hegel and Merleau-Ponty.David Ciavatta - 2017 - Hegel Bulletin 38 (1):45-66.
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  2.  19
    Hegel on the Parallels Between Action and the Ontology of Life.David Ciavatta - 2015 - The Owl of Minerva 47 (1/2):69-108.
    This paper shows that Hegel’s ontology of living beings provides us with indispensable conceptual resources for making sense of his account of the ontology of human action. For Hegel, living bodies are ontologically distinct in that their objective presence is thoroughly permeated by the self-reflexivity characteristic of subjectivity, and as such they cannot be adequately conceived in terms of categories that are appropriate to inanimate, “subject-less” objects. It is argued that actions are similar in this regard, and like organic bodies (...)
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  3.  55
    Spirit, the Family, and the Unconscious in Hegel's Philosophy.David V. Ciavatta - 2009 - State University of New York Press.
    The book provides a rich understanding of the role that family has in one's psychological development with respect not only to other people, but also to the ...
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  4.  71
    On Burying the Dead: Funerary Rites and the Dialectic of Freedom and Nature in Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit.David Ciavatta - 2007 - International Philosophical Quarterly 47 (3):279-296.
    Hegel’s specific interpretation of burial rituals in the Phenomenology is an important part of his general understanding of the development of human freedom and of spirit. For Hegel, freedom is not something immediately given, but something that must be realized by way of the self’s ongoing practical engagement with the world, and in particular by way of the self’s transformation of the otherwise meaningless realm of nature into a vehicle for realizing a specifically human meaning. The practice of burial rites (...)
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  5.  34
    Idealism and Objectivity: Understanding Fichte's Jena Project. [REVIEW]David Ciavatta - 2000 - The Owl of Minerva 31 (2):227-235.
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  6.  30
    The Event of Absolute Freedom: Hegel on the French Revolution and its Calendar.David Ciavatta - 2014 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 40 (6):577-605.
    It is argued that the critique of the French Revolution that Hegel develops in the Phenomenology of Spirit can be fruitfully understood as exposing the problematic relationship that the revolution had to its own character as an historical event. Hegel’s critique of the revolution’s operative commitment to an abstract, ahistorical rationality is explored by way of a study of the significance of the revolutionaries’ attempt to institute a radical new calendar system: it is argued that the Republican Calendar provides an (...)
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  7.  39
    Hegel on Desire’s Knowledge.David Ciavatta - 2008 - Review of Metaphysics 61 (3):527-554.
  8. Hegel and the Phenomenology of the Family.David V. Ciavatta - 2003 - Dissertation, The Pennsylvania State University
    This dissertation investigates the complex phenomenon of familial intimacy as a distinctive and essential basis of self-identity and ethical obligation. The account of the family is developed in accordance with the social categories that Hegel articulates in the context of his two most developed studies of human institutions, the Philosophy of Right and the Phenomenology of Spirit, to demonstrate that Hegel's systematic approach to social and political issues provides us with indispensable insights into the inescapably intersubjective nature of all dimensions (...)
     
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  9. Michael Quante, Hegel's Concept of Action. [REVIEW]David Ciavatta - 2006 - Philosophy in Review 26:221-223.
     
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  10.  1
    Spirit, the Family, and the Unconscious in Hegel's Philosophy.David V. Ciavatta - 2009 - State University of New York Press.
    _Investigates the role of family in Hegel’s phenomenology._.
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  11.  32
    Christopher Yeomans. Freedom and Reflection: Hegel and the Logic of Agency.David Ciavatta - 2012 - The Owl of Minerva 44 (1/2):168-176.
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  12.  57
    The Unreflective Bonds of Intimacy: Hegel on Familial Ties and the Modern Person.David Ciavatta - 2006 - Philosophical Forum 37 (2):153–181.
  13.  11
    Hegel on the Idealism of Practical Life.David V. Ciavatta - 2016 - Hegel Bulletin 37 (1):1-28.
    This paper investigates Hegel’s thesis that we are, in our practical relation to the world, inherently committed to certain aspects of idealistic metaphysics. For Hegel, our practical attitude is fundamentally at odds with a naïve realism that would take the world to consist ultimately of self-contained, self-sufficient individuals whose relations to one another are fundamentally external to their identities. Hegel contends that our practical attitude is premised upon an overcoming of this mutual externality, and especially the externality which is supposed (...)
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  14.  53
    Hegel on Owning One’s Own Body.David Ciavatta - 2005 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 43 (1):1-23.
  15. Michael Quante, Hegel's Concept of Action Reviewed By.David Ciavatta - 2006 - Philosophy in Review 26 (3):221-223.
     
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  16.  5
    Hegel on Owning One’s Own Body.David Ciavatta - 2005 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 43 (1):1-23.
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  17.  1
    On Burying the Dead: Funerary Rites and the Dialectic of Freedom and Nature in Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit.David Ciavatta - 2007 - International Philosophical Quarterly 47 (3):279-296.
    Hegel’s specific interpretation of burial rituals in the Phenomenology is an important part of his general understanding of the development of human freedom and of spirit. For Hegel, freedom is not something immediately given, but something that must be realized by way of the self’s ongoing practical engagement with the world, and in particular by way of the self’s transformation of the otherwise meaningless realm of nature into a vehicle for realizing a specifically human meaning. The practice of burial rites (...)
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