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  1. What makes pains unpleasant?David Bain - 2013 - Philosophical Studies 166 (1):69-89.
    The unpleasantness of pain motivates action. Hence many philosophers have doubted that it can be accounted for purely in terms of pain’s possession of indicative representational content. Instead, they have explained it in terms of subjects’ inclinations to stop their pains, or in terms of pain’s imperative content. I claim that such “noncognitivist” accounts fail to accommodate unpleasant pain’s reason-giving force. What is needed, I argue, is a view on which pains are unpleasant, motivate, and provide reasons in virtue of (...)
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  2. Why Take Painkillers?David Bain - 2019 - Noûs 53 (2):462-490.
    Accounts of the nature of unpleasant pain have proliferated over the past decade, but there has been little systematic investigation of which of them can accommodate its badness. This paper is such a study. In its sights are two targets: those who deny the non-instrumental disvalue of pain's unpleasantness; and those who allow it but deny that it can be accommodated by the view—advanced by me and others—that unpleasant pains are interoceptive experiences with evaluative content. Against the former, I argue (...)
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  3. Pains that Don't Hurt.David Bain - 2014 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 92 (2):305-320.
    Pain asymbolia is a rare condition caused by brain damage, usually in adulthood. Asymbolics feel pain but appear indifferent to it, and indifferent also to visual and verbal threats. How should we make sense of this? Nikola Grahek thinks asymbolics’ pains are abnormal, lacking a component that make normal pains unpleasant and motivating. Colin Klein thinks that what is abnormal is not asymbolics’ pains, but asymbolics: they have a psychological deficit making them unresponsive to unpleasant pain. I argue that an (...)
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  4. The Imperative View of Pain.David Bain - 2011 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 18 (9-10):164-85.
    Pain, crucially, is unpleasant and motivational. It can be awful; and it drives us to action, e.g. to take our weight off a sprained ankle. But what is the relationship between pain and those two features? And in virtue of what does pain have them? Addressing these questions, Colin Klein and Richard J. Hall have recently developed the idea that pains are, at least partly, experiential commands—to stop placing your weight on your ankle, for example. In this paper, I reject (...)
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  5. Evaluativist Accounts of Pain's Unpleasantness.David Bain - 2017 - In Jennifer Corns (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Pain. New York: Routledge. pp. 40-50.
    Evaluativism is best thought of as a way of enriching a perceptual view of pain to account for pain’s unpleasantness or painfulness. Once it was common for philosophers to contrast pains with perceptual experiences (McGinn 1982; Rorty 1980). It was thought that perceptual experiences were intentional (or content-bearing, or about something), whereas pains were representationally blank. But today many of us reject this contrast. For us, your having a pain in your toe is a matter not of your sensing “pain-ly” (...)
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  6. The location of pains.David Bain - 2007 - Philosophical Papers 36 (2):171-205.
    Perceptualists say that having a pain in a body part consists in perceiving the part as instantiating some property. I argue that perceptualism makes better sense of the connections between pain location and the experiences undergone by people in pain than three alternative accounts that dispense with perception. Turning to fellow perceptualists, I also reject ways in which David Armstrong and Michael Tye understand and motivate perceptualism, and I propose an alternative interpretation, one that vitiates a pair of objections—due to (...)
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  7. Pain, Pleasure, and Unpleasure.David Bain & Michael Brady - 2014 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 5 (1):1-14.
    Compare your pain when immersing your hand in freezing water and your pleasure when you taste your favourite wine. The relationship seems obvious. Your pain experience is unpleasant, aversive, negative, and bad. Your experience of the wine is pleasant, attractive, positive, and good. Pain and pleasure are straightforwardly opposites. Or that, at any rate, can seem beyond doubt, and to leave little more to be said. But, in fact, it is not beyond doubt. And, true or false, it leaves a (...)
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  8. McDowell and the Presentation of Pains.David Bain - 2009 - Philosophical Topics 37 (1):1-24.
    It can seem natural to say that, when in pain, we undergo experiences which present to us certain experience-dependent particulars, namely pains. As part of his wider approach to mind and world, John McDowell has elaborated an interesting but neglected version of this account of pain. Here I set out McDowell’s account at length, and place it in context. I argue that his subjectivist conception of the objects of pain experience is incompatible with his requirement that such experience be presentational, (...)
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  9. The Philosophy of Pain - Introduction.David Bain, Jennifer Corns & Michael Brady - 2018 - In David Bain, Michael Brady & Jennifer Corns (eds.), Philosophy of Pain. London: Routledge.
    Over recent decades, pain has received increasing attention as – with ever greater sophistication and rigour – theorists have tried to answer the deep and difficult questions it poses. What is pain’s nature? What is its point? In what sense is it bad? The papers collected in this volume are a contribution to that effort ...
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  10.  24
    Audience Address in Greek Tragedy.David Bain - 1975 - Classical Quarterly 25 (01):13-.
    All drama is meant to be heard by an audience, so that there is a sense in which any utterance in a play may be called audience address. It is possible, however, to draw a distinction between on the one hand the kind of drama in which the presence of an audience is acknowledged by the actors—either explicitly by direct address or reference to the audience, or implicitly by reference to the theatrical nature of the action the actors are undertaking, (...)
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  11. Color, Externalism, and Switch Cases.David Bain - 2007 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 45 (3):335-362.
    I defend externalism about color experiences and color thoughts, which I argue color objectivism requires. Externalists face the following question: would a subject's wearing inverting lenses eventually change the color content of, for instance, those visual experiences the subject reports with “red”? From the work of Ned Block, David Velleman, Paul Boghossian, Michael Tye, and Fiona Macpherson, I extract problems facing those who answer “Yes” and problems facing those who answer “No.” I show how these problems can be overcome, leaving (...)
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  12. When Pain Isn't Painful.David Bain - 2015 - The Philosophers' Magazine 3.
    Sometimes the philosophical armchair gets bumped by empirical facts. So it is when thinking about pain. For good or ill (good, actually, as we shall see) most of us are intimately acquainted with physical pain, the kind you feel when you stand on a nail or burn your hand. And, from the armchair, it can seem blindingly obvious that pain is essentially unpleasant. There are of course unpleasant experiences that aren’t pains – nausea or itches, for example – but surely (...)
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  13. Pain (Oxford Bibliographies Online).David Bain - 2015 - Oxford Bibliographies Online.
    Philosophers think of pain less and less as a paradigmatic instance of mentality, for which they seek a general account, and increasingly as a rich and fruitful topic in its own right. Pain raises specific questions: about mentality and consciousness certainly, but also about embodiment, affect, motivation, and value, to name but a few. The growth of philosophical interest in pain has gone hand-in-hand with the growth of pain science, which burgeoned in the 1960s. This is no accident: developments in (...)
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  14.  72
    Pain and Action.David Bain - manuscript
    While many agree that unpleasant pains motivate, little attention has been paid to this idea’s action-theoretic significance, to what kind of motivation pains are, or to the status of the behaviour they motivate. I claim that some pain behaviour belongs to a neglected category. For it is not brute behaviour, but action; yet it is not motivated by desires or intentions, nor like other behaviour that philosophers construe as neither brute nor desire-motivated, such as habitual action. Rather it is what (...)
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  15. What is philosophy?David Bain - manuscript
    The best route into philosophy is not to consider a definition, but to get your own philosophical cogs turning. Consider the questions philosophers engage and think about the many different ways they've addressed them. But, most important, grapple with the questions yourself.
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  16.  68
    Pain.David Bain - manuscript
    Commissioned for Routledge Encylopaedia of Philosophy.
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  17.  70
    Pain and Pleasure - A Special Issue of Review of Psychology & Philosophy.David Bain & Michael Brady (eds.) - 2014 - Springer.
    Table of Contents: Olivier Massin, 'Pleasure and Its Contraries'; Colin Klein, 'The Penumbral Theory of Masochistic Pleasure'; Siri Leknes and Brock Bastian, 'The Benefits of Pain'; Valerie Gray Hardcastle, 'Pleasure Gone Awry? A New Conceptualization of Chronic Pain and Addiction'; Richard Gray, 'Pain, Perception and the Sensory Modalities: Revisiting the Intensive Theory'; Jonathan Cohen and Matthew Fulkerson, Affect, Rationalization, and Motivation; Murat Aydede, 'How to Unify Theories of Sensory Pleasure: An Adverbialist Proposal'; Adam Shriver, 'The Asymmetrical Contributions of Pleasure and (...)
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  18.  20
    Philosophy of Pain: Unpleasantness, Emotion, and Deviance.David Bain & Michael Brady (eds.) - 2018 - New York: Routledge.
    Over recent decades pain has received increasing attention as philosophers, psychologists and neuroscientists try to answer deep and difficult questions about it. What is pain? What makes pain unpleasant? How is pain related to the emotions? This volume provides a rich and wide-ranging exploration of these questions and important new insights into the philosophy of pain. Divided into three clear sections - pain and motivation; pain and emotion; and deviant pain - the collection covers fundamental topics in the philosophy and (...)
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  19.  48
    Sensation and Representation a Study of Intentionalist Accounts of the Bodily Sensations.David Bain - 2000 - Dissertation,
    There are good reasons for wanting to adopt an intentionalist account of experiences generally, an account according to which having an experience is a matter of representing the world as being some way or other—according to which, that is, such mental episodes have intrinsic, conceptual, representational content. Such an approach promises, for example, to provide a satisfying conception of experiences’ subjectivity, their phenomenal character, and their crucial role in constituting reasons for our judgements about the world. It promises this, moreover, (...)
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  20. Philosophy of Pain.David Bain, Michael Brady & Jennifer Corns (eds.) - 2018 - London: Routledge.
    A collection, edited by David Bain, Michael Brady, and Jennifer Corns, originating in our Pain Project. Table of Contents: Colin Klein and Manolo Martínez – ‘Imperativism and Pain Intensity’; Murat Aydede and Matthew Fulkerson – ‘Pain and Theories of Sensory Affect’; Dan-Mikael Ellingson, Morten Kringlebach, and Siri Leknes – ‘A Neuroscience Perspective on Pleasure and Pain’; Michael Brady – ‘The Rationality of Emotional and Physical Suffering’; Jennifer Corns – ‘The Placebo Effect’; Jesse Prinz – ‘What is the Affective Component of (...)
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  21. Philosophy of Suffering: Metaphysics, Value, and Normativity.Michael S. Brady, David Bain & Jennifer Corns (eds.) - 2019 - London: Routledge.
    A collection, edited by David Bain, Michael Brady, and Jennifer Corns, originating in our Value of Suffering Project. Table of Contents: Michael Wheeler - ‘How should affective phenomena be studied?’; Julien Deonna & Fabrice Teroni – ‘Pleasures, unpleasures, and emotions’; Hilla Jacobson – ‘The attitudinal representational theory of painfulness fleshed out’; Tim Schroeder – ‘What we represent when we represent the badness of getting hurt’; Hagit Benbaji – ‘A defence of the inner view of pain’; Olivier Massin – ‘Suffering pain’; (...)
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  22.  77
    Paul Roche: Three Plays of Euripides Translated. (Alcestis, Medea, Bacchae.) Pp. xii + 126. New York: W. W. Norton, 1974. Cloth, $6.95.David Bain - 1976 - The Classical Review 26 (2):264-264.
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  23.  48
    B. Marzullo: I sofismi di Prometeo. (Il pensiero storico, 82.) Pp. xix+683. Florence: La nuova Italia editrice, 1993. Paper, L. 75000.David Bain - 1995 - The Classical Review 45 (2):430-430.
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  24.  43
    Euripides, Electra - M. J. Cropp : Euripides, Electra . Pp. lxii + 194. Warminster: Aris & Phillips Ltd., 1988. £28.David Bain - 1990 - The Classical Review 40 (2):219-221.
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  25.  17
    Euripides, Ion 1261–81.David Bain - 1979 - Classical Quarterly 29 (02):263-.
    Ion enters in pursuit of Kreousa who following the advice of the chorus has just taken up position at the altar . His speech on entering falls into five sections which L exhibits in the following order.
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  26.  20
    Euripides, Ion 1261–81.David Bain - 1979 - Classical Quarterly 29 (2):263-267.
    Ion enters in pursuit of Kreousa who following the advice of the chorus has just taken up position at the altar. His speech on entering falls into five sections which L exhibits in the following order.
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  27.  23
    Greek Pederasty.David Bain - 1984 - The Classical Review 34 (01):86-.
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  28.  4
    Γαiτανιον, γaitani(n) and a passage in the cyranides.David Bain - 1994 - Philologus: Zeitschrift für Antike Literatur Und Ihre Rezeption 138 (1):144-148.
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  29.  22
    Leo Salingar: Shakespeare and the Traditions of Comedy. Pp. x + 356. Cambridge: University Press, 1974. Cloth, £6.David Bain - 1977 - The Classical Review 27 (01):153-.
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  30.  9
    Leo Salingar: Shakespeare and the Traditions of Comedy. Pp. x + 356. Cambridge: University Press, 1974. Cloth, £6.David Bain - 1977 - The Classical Review 27 (1):153-153.
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  31.  35
    More Light on the Peace.David Bain - 1986 - The Classical Review 36 (02):201-.
  32.  19
    Notice. Euripides Andromache. (The plays of Euripides.). M Lloyd.David Bain - 1997 - The Classical Review 47 (1):195-195.
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  33.  24
    Prayers in Euripides.David Bain - 1974 - The Classical Review 24 (01):25-.
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  34.  17
    Review Article II: Tragedy II.David Bain - 1998 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 118:196-198.
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  35.  29
    Review. Euripides: Children of Heracles, Hippolytus, Andromache, Hecuba. D Kovacs.David Bain - 1997 - The Classical Review 47 (1):18-20.
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  36.  28
    Religion in Euripides.David Bain - 1990 - The Classical Review 40 (02):221-.
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  37.  15
    ΛΗΚγΘΙΟΝ ΑΠΩΛΕСΕΝ: Some Reservations.David Bain - 1985 - Classical Quarterly 35 (01):31-.
    The phrase ληκύθιον πώλεсεν, which Aeschylus in the contest of Aristophanes' Frogs mockingly introduces into six of the prologues of his rival Euripides , has recently attracted a great deal of attention. With a couple of exceptions those scholars who have discussed it during the last fifteen years agree that it contains a sexual innuendo. Where they differ is on the exact nature of its meaning. What vase shape does ληκύθιον or λήκυθοс denote and hence what part of the male (...)
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  38.  7
    ΛΗΚγΘΙΟΝ ΑΠΩΛΕСΕΝ: Some Reservations.David Bain - 1985 - Classical Quarterly 35 (1):31-37.
    The phraseληκύθιον ⋯πώλεсεν, which Aeschylus in the contest of Aristophanes'Frogsmockingly introduces into six of the prologues of his rival Euripides (twice into one of them), has recently attracted a great deal of attention. With a couple of exceptions those scholars who have discussed it during the last fifteen years agree that it contains a sexual innuendo. Where they differ is on the exact nature of its meaning. What vase shape doesληκύθιονorλήκυθοсdenote and hence what part of the male genitalia is envisaged? (...)
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  39.  8
    Salpe's ΠAIΓNIA_: Athenaeus 322A And Plin. _H. N. 28.38.David Bain - 1998 - Classical Quarterly 48 (1):262-268.
    Pauly'sReal-Encyclopädieknows of two women named after the attractive looking,but allegedly unappetising fish,c⋯λπη. The first is mentioned several times in theelder Pliny, who on one occasion refers to her as anobstetrix, while the second features in theDeipnosophistaeof Athenaeus as a writer of πα⋯γνια. In a recent issue of this journal J. N. Davidson has made the suggestion that they were one and the same person. Salpe's πα⋯γνια, Davidson argues, would not have consisted of light or frivolous verse, but of a compilation (...)
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  40.  28
    Salpe's ΠAIΓNIA_: Athenaeus 322A And Plin. _H. N. 28.38.David Bain - 1998 - Classical Quarterly 48 (01):262-.
    Pauly's Real-Encyclopädie knows of two women named after the attractive looking,but allegedly unappetising fish, cλπη. The first is mentioned several times in theelder Pliny, who on one occasion refers to her as an obstetrix, while the second features in the Deipnosophistae of Athenaeus as a writer of παγνια. In a recent issue of this journal J. N. Davidson has made the suggestion that they were one and the same person. Salpe's παγνια, Davidson argues, would not have consisted of light or (...)
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  41.  23
    Salpe's ΠAIΓNIA_: Athenaeus 322A And Plin. _H. N. 28.38.David Bain - 1998 - Classical Quarterly 48 (1):262-268.
    Pauly'sReal-Encyclopädieknows of two women named after the attractive looking,but allegedly unappetising fish,c⋯λπη. The first is mentioned several times in theelder Pliny, who on one occasion refers to her as anobstetrix, while the second features in theDeipnosophistaeof Athenaeus as a writer of πα⋯γνια. In a recent issue of this journal J. N. Davidson has made the suggestion that they were one and the same person. Salpe's πα⋯γνια, Davidson argues, would not have consisted of light or frivolous verse, but of a compilation (...)
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  42.  30
    Stage Communication in Greek Tragedy.David Bain - 1982 - The Classical Review 32 (01):4-.
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  43.  23
    Six Greek Verbs of Sexual Congress.David Bain - 1991 - Classical Quarterly 41 (01):51-.
    There existed in Greek a multitude of words denoting or connoting sexual congress. The list of verbs given by Pollux only skims the surface. In what follows I discuss words which with one exception are absent from this list and belong, as will be seen from their distribution, to the lower register of the Greek language. They are all demonstrably direct expressions, blunt and non-euphemistic. Only one of them, κιν, is at all common in non-sexual contexts. As for the rest, (...)
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  44.  10
    The Application of Leeches in The Cyranides 5 Meschini).David Bain - 1996 - Mnemosyne 49 (2):182-184.
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  45.  32
    The Euripidean Chorus.David Bain - 1992 - The Classical Review 42 (02):266-.
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  46.  23
    The Loeb Euripides.David Bain - 1995 - The Classical Review 45 (02):231-.
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  47.  22
    The Prologues of Euripides' Iphigeneia in Aulis.David Bain - 1977 - Classical Quarterly 27 (01):10-.
    Anyone who seeks to add to the already vast pile of literature dealing with the I.A. must needs feel apologetic, especially if he is conscious that little of what he will say is new. Nevertheless this seems to be one of those occasions when it is necessary to restate old arguments. Recent contributors to the debate about the problems of the opening of the play either fail to realize what the problems are or else attempt to explain away valid criticisms (...)
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  48.  28
    Trojan Women.David Bain - 1995 - The Classical Review 45 (02):234-.
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  49.  5
    Actors and Audience. A Study of Asides and Related Conventions in Greek Drama.David Sider & David Bain - 1978 - American Journal of Philology 99 (3):399.
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  50. Pain: New Essays on Its Nature and the Methodology of Its Study, edited by Murat Aydede. [REVIEW]David Bain - 2010 - Mind 119 (474):451-456.
    Our preoccupation with pain can seem an eccentricity of philosophers. But just a little reflection leads one into the thickets. When I see a pencil on my desk, I’m aware of a physical thing and its objective properties; but what am I aware of when I feel a pain in my toe? A pain, perhaps? Or my toe’s hurting? But what is the nature of such things? Are they physical? Are they objective? To avoid unexperienced pains, we might say they (...)
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