115 found
Order:
See also
David Bain
Glasgow University
  1. What Makes Pains Unpleasant?David Bain - 2013 - Philosophical Studies 166 (1):69-89.
    The unpleasantness of pain motivates action. Hence many philosophers have doubted that it can be accounted for purely in terms of pain’s possession of indicative representational content. Instead, they have explained it in terms of subjects’ inclinations to stop their pains, or in terms of pain’s imperative content. I claim that such “noncognitivist” accounts fail to accommodate unpleasant pain’s reason-giving force. What is needed, I argue, is a view on which pains are unpleasant, motivate, and provide reasons in virtue of (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   82 citations  
  2. Why Take Painkillers?David Bain - 2019 - Noûs 53 (2):462-490.
    Accounts of the nature of unpleasant pain have proliferated over the past decade, but there has been little systematic investigation of which of them can accommodate its badness. This paper is such a study. In its sights are two targets: those who deny the non-instrumental disvalue of pain's unpleasantness; and those who allow it but deny that it can be accommodated by the view—advanced by me and others—that unpleasant pains are interoceptive experiences with evaluative content. Against the former, I argue (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  3. Pains That Don't Hurt.David Bain - 2014 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 92 (2):305-320.
    Pain asymbolia is a rare condition caused by brain damage, usually in adulthood. Asymbolics feel pain but appear indifferent to it, and indifferent also to visual and verbal threats. How should we make sense of this? Nikola Grahek thinks asymbolics’ pains are abnormal, lacking a component that make normal pains unpleasant and motivating. Colin Klein thinks that what is abnormal is not asymbolics’ pains, but asymbolics: they have a psychological deficit making them unresponsive to unpleasant pain. I argue that an (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   28 citations  
  4. Evaluativist Accounts of Pain's Unpleasantness.David Bain - 2017 - In Jennifer Corns (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of the Philosophy of Pain. London: Routledge. pp. 40-50.
    Evaluativism is best thought of as a way of enriching a perceptual view of pain to account for pain’s unpleasantness or painfulness. Once it was common for philosophers to contrast pains with perceptual experiences (McGinn 1982; Rorty 1980). It was thought that perceptual experiences were intentional (or content-bearing, or about something), whereas pains were representationally blank. But today many of us reject this contrast. For us, your having a pain in your toe is a matter not of your sensing “pain-ly” (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  5. The Imperative View of Pain.David Bain - 2011 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 18 (9-10):164-85.
    Pain, crucially, is unpleasant and motivational. It can be awful; and it drives us to action, e.g. to take our weight off a sprained ankle. But what is the relationship between pain and those two features? And in virtue of what does pain have them? Addressing these questions, Colin Klein and Richard J. Hall have recently developed the idea that pains are, at least partly, experiential commands—to stop placing your weight on your ankle, for example. In this paper, I reject (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   26 citations  
  6. The Location of Pains.David Bain - 2007 - Philosophical Papers 36 (2):171-205.
    Perceptualists say that having a pain in a body part consists in perceiving the part as instantiating some property. I argue that perceptualism makes better sense of the connections between pain location and the experiences undergone by people in pain than three alternative accounts that dispense with perception. Turning to fellow perceptualists, I also reject ways in which David Armstrong and Michael Tye understand and motivate perceptualism, and I propose an alternative interpretation, one that vitiates a pair of objections—due to (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   32 citations  
  7. Pain, Pleasure, and Unpleasure.David Bain & Michael Brady - 2014 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 5 (1):1-14.
    Compare your pain when immersing your hand in freezing water and your pleasure when you taste your favourite wine. The relationship seems obvious. Your pain experience is unpleasant, aversive, negative, and bad. Your experience of the wine is pleasant, attractive, positive, and good. Pain and pleasure are straightforwardly opposites. Or that, at any rate, can seem beyond doubt, and to leave little more to be said. But, in fact, it is not beyond doubt. And, true or false, it leaves a (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  8.  7
    Reading Greek Tragedy.David Bain & S. Goldhill - 1988 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 108:239-240.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  9. McDowell and the Presentation of Pains.David Bain - 2009 - Philosophical Topics 37 (1):1-24.
    It can seem natural to say that, when in pain, we undergo experiences which present to us certain experience-dependent particulars, namely pains. As part of his wider approach to mind and world, John McDowell has elaborated an interesting but neglected version of this account of pain. Here I set out McDowell’s account at length, and place it in context. I argue that his subjectivist conception of the objects of pain experience is incompatible with his requirement that such experience be presentational, (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  10.  7
    Prometheus Bound.David Bain, Aeschylus & M. Griffith - 1985 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 105:180-181.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  11.  17
    The Stagecraft of Aeschylus: The Dramatic Use of Exits and Entrances in Greek Tragedy. [REVIEW]David Bain & O. Taplin - 1979 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 99:171-172.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  12.  22
    Vision and Stagecraft in Sophocles.David Bain & D. Seale - 1984 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 104:198-199.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  13.  10
    Nothing to Do with Dionysos? Athenian Drama in Its Social Context. [REVIEW]David Bain, J. J. Winkler & F. I. Zeitlin - 1993 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 113:186-187.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  14. Color, Externalism and Switch Cases.David Bain - 2007 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 45 (3):335-362.
    I defend externalism about color experiences and color thoughts, which I argue color objectivism requires. Externalists face the following question: would a subject’s wearing inverting lenses eventually change the color content of, for instance, those visual experiences the subject reports with “red”? From the work of Ned Block, David Velleman, Paul Boghossian, Michael Tye, and Fiona Macpherson, I extract problems facing those who answer “Yes” and problems facing those who answer “No.” I show how these problems can be overcome, leaving (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  15.  14
    Audience Address in Greek Tragedy.David Bain - 1975 - Classical Quarterly 25 (01):13-.
    All drama is meant to be heard by an audience, so that there is a sense in which any utterance in a play may be called audience address. It is possible, however, to draw a distinction between on the one hand the kind of drama in which the presence of an audience is acknowledged by the actors—either explicitly by direct address or reference to the audience, or implicitly by reference to the theatrical nature of the action the actors are undertaking, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  16.  24
    Sophocles' Oedipus: Evidence and Self-Conviction.David Bain & F. M. Ahl - 1993 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 113:189-190.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  17.  27
    Sensation and Representation a Study of Intentionalist Accounts of the Bodily Sensations.David Bain - 2000 - Dissertation,
    There are good reasons for wanting to adopt an intentionalist account of experiences generally, an account according to which having an experience is a matter of representing the world as being some way or other—according to which, that is, such mental episodes have intrinsic, conceptual, representational content. Such an approach promises, for example, to provide a satisfying conception of experiences’ subjectivity, their phenomenal character, and their crucial role in constituting reasons for our judgements about the world. It promises this, moreover, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  18.  7
    Euripides, Ion 1261–81.David Bain - 1979 - Classical Quarterly 29 (02):263-.
    Ion enters in pursuit of Kreousa who following the advice of the chorus has just taken up position at the altar . His speech on entering falls into five sections which L exhibits in the following order.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  19.  6
    ΛΗΚγΘΙΟΝ ΑΠΩΛΕСΕΝ: Some Reservations.David Bain - 1985 - Classical Quarterly 35 (01):31-.
    The phrase ληκύθιον πώλεсεν, which Aeschylus in the contest of Aristophanes' Frogs mockingly introduces into six of the prologues of his rival Euripides , has recently attracted a great deal of attention. With a couple of exceptions those scholars who have discussed it during the last fifteen years agree that it contains a sexual innuendo. Where they differ is on the exact nature of its meaning. What vase shape does ληκύθιον or λήκυθοс denote and hence what part of the male (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  20.  6
    The Prologues of Euripides' Iphigeneia in Aulis.David Bain - 1977 - Classical Quarterly 27 (01):10-.
    Anyone who seeks to add to the already vast pile of literature dealing with the I.A. must needs feel apologetic, especially if he is conscious that little of what he will say is new. Nevertheless this seems to be one of those occasions when it is necessary to restate old arguments. Recent contributors to the debate about the problems of the opening of the play either fail to realize what the problems are or else attempt to explain away valid criticisms (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  21.  3
    Διονυсιακοί Τεχνîται. [REVIEW]David Bain - 1991 - The Classical Review 41 (1):245-245.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22.  24
    An Edition of Aristophanes' Peace Alan H. Sommerstein: The Comedies of Aristophanes, Vol. 5: Peace, Edited with Translation and Notes. Pp. Xxv + 196. Warminster: Aris and Phillips, 1985. £16 (Paper, £6.95). [REVIEW]David Bain - 1986 - The Classical Review 36 (02):199-201.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23.  23
    An Edition of Aristophanes' Peace. [REVIEW]David Bain - 1986 - The Classical Review 36 (2):199-201.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24.  5
    Aeschylus: Persians. [REVIEW]David Bain - 1999 - The Classical Review 49 (1):249-250.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25.  23
    André Rivier: Essai sur le tragique d'Euripide. Seconde édition entièrement revue. Pp. xiv + 218. Paris: Boccard, 1975. Paper. [REVIEW]David Bain - 1977 - The Classical Review 27 (1):104-104.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26.  6
    Andromedatragodien: Sophokles, Euripides, Livius Andronikos, Ennius, Acciuss. [REVIEW]David Bain & R. Klimek-Winter - 1995 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 115:191-192.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27.  40
    B. Marzullo: I sofismi di Prometeo. (Il pensiero storico, 82.) Pp. xix+683. Florence: La nuova Italia editrice, 1993. Paper, L. 75000.David Bain - 1995 - The Classical Review 45 (2):430-430.
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28.  14
    C. E. Hajistephanou: The Use of Φ ΣΙΣ and its Cognates in Greek Tragedy with Special Reference to Character Drawing. Pp. Xii + 163. Nicosia, Cyprus: Zavallis Press, 1975. Paper, £3. [REVIEW]David Bain - 1978 - The Classical Review 28 (01):147-.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29.  4
    C. E. Hajistephanou: The Use of ΦϒΣΙΣ and its Cognates in Greek Tragedy with Special Reference to Character Drawing. Pp. Xii + 163. Nicosia, Cyprus: Zavallis Press, 1975. Paper, £3. [REVIEW]David Bain - 1978 - The Classical Review 28 (1):147-147.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30.  29
    Colour Terms in Greek Poetry. [REVIEW]David Bain - 1977 - The Classical Review 27 (1):121-122.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31. Daniel Dennett. Reconciling Science and Our Self-Conception. By Matthew. [REVIEW]David Bain - 2005 - Philosophical Quarterly 55 (219):369-371.
    Over 35 years, Daniel Dennett has articulated a rich and expansive philosophical outlook. There have been elaborations, refinements, and changes of mind, exposi- tory and substantive. This makes him hard to pin down. Does he, for example, think intentional states are real? In places, he sounds distinctly instrumentalist; elsewhere, he avows realism, ‘sort of’. What is needed is a map, charting developments and tracing dialectical threads through his extensive writings and the different regions of his thought. This is what Matthew (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32.  27
    D. Kovacs (Ed., Trans.): Euripides: Suppliant Women, Electra, Heracles. (Loeb Classical Library, 9.) Pp. Viii + 455. Cambridge, MA and London: Harvard University Press, 1998. Cased, +11.95. ISBN: 0-674-99566-X. [REVIEW]David Bain - 1999 - The Classical Review 49 (2):560-560.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33.  28
    Das Motiv der ‘Tagesspanne’—Ein Beitrag Zur Ästhetik der Zeitgestaltung Im Griechisch-Römischen Drama. [REVIEW]David Bain - 1995 - The Classical Review 45 (2):457-458.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34.  8
    Euripides Andromache. [REVIEW]David Bain - 1997 - The Classical Review 47 (1):195-195.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35.  3
    Euripides, Electra. [REVIEW]David Bain - 1990 - The Classical Review 40 (2):219-221.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36.  38
    Euripides, Electra - M. J. Cropp : Euripides, Electra . Pp. Lxii + 194. Warminster: Aris & Phillips Ltd., 1988. £28.David Bain - 1990 - The Classical Review 40 (2):219-221.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37.  24
    Eschilo E la Lexis Tragica. [REVIEW]David Bain - 1998 - The Classical Review 48 (1):169-170.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38.  24
    Euripides, Heracles Godfrey W. Bond: Euripides, Heracles. With Introduction and Commentary. Pp. Xxxv + 429. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1981. £25. [REVIEW]David Bain - 1983 - The Classical Review 33 (01):7-9.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39.  3
    Euripides, Heracles. [REVIEW]David Bain - 1983 - The Classical Review 33 (1):7-9.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40.  23
    E. H ALL (Ed.): Aeschylus: Persians (Classical Texts). Pp. Vi + 201, 5 Figs. Warminster: Aris & Phillips, 1996. Cased, £35/$49.95 (Paper, £14.95/$24.95). ISBN: 0-85668-596-8 (0-85668-597-6 Pbk). [REVIEW]David Bain - 1999 - The Classical Review 49 (1):249-250.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41.  9
    Euripides, Ion 1261–81.David Bain - 1979 - Classical Quarterly 29 (2):263-267.
    Ion enters in pursuit of Kreousa who following the advice of the chorus has just taken up position at the altar. His speech on entering falls into five sections which L exhibits in the following order.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42.  3
    Essai Sur le Tragique d'Euripide. [REVIEW]David Bain - 1977 - The Classical Review 27 (1):104-104.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43.  9
    Euripides: Suppliant Women, Electra, Heracles. [REVIEW]David Bain - 1999 - The Classical Review 49 (2):560-560.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44.  21
    Euripides' Treatment of Myth. [REVIEW]David Bain - 1982 - The Classical Review 32 (2):136-137.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45.  15
    Greek Pederasty.David Bain - 1984 - The Classical Review 34 (01):86-.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46.  33
    Greek Pederasty Harald Patzer: Die Griechische Knabenliebe. (Sitzungsberichte der Wissenschaftlichen Gesellschaft an der Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universität Frankfurt Am Main, 19. 1.) Pp. 131. Wiesbaden: Franz Steiner, 1982. Paper, DM. 32. [REVIEW]David Bain - 1984 - The Classical Review 34 (01):86-89.
  47.  42
    I. E. Stefanis: Διονυсιακοὶ Τεχνîται. Σνµβολὲς Στὴν Προσωπογραφία Το Θεάτρον Καὶ Τς Μονσικς Τν Ἀρχαίων Ἑλλήνων. Pp. 616; 15 Photographs. Heraklion: Panepistimiakes Ekdoseis Kritis, 1988. [REVIEW]David Bain - 1991 - The Classical Review 41 (1):245-245.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48.  25
    Intellectualité Et Thé'tricalité Dans L’Oeuvre D’Euripide. [REVIEW]David Bain - 1998 - The Classical Review 48 (2):475-476.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49.  5
    Il Monologo Nel Teatro di Euripide. [REVIEW]David Bain - 1999 - The Classical Review 49 (1):250-251.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50. What is Philosophy?David Bain - manuscript
    The best route into philosophy is not to consider a definition, but to get your own philosophical cogs turning. Consider the questions philosophers engage and think about the many different ways they've addressed them. But, most important, grapple with the questions yourself.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 115