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David B. Suits [13]David Bowden Suits [1]
  1. Why Death Is Not Bad for the One Who Died.David B. Suits - 2001 - American Philosophical Quarterly 38 (1):69 - 84.
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  2.  52
    Really Believing in Fiction.David B. Suits - 2006 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 87 (3):369–386.
    How is it possible to respond emotionally to that which we believe is not the case? All of the many responses to this "paradox of fiction" make one or more of three important mistakes: (1) neglecting the context of believing, (2) assuming that belief is an all-or-nothing affair, and (3) assuming that if you believe that p then you cannot also reasonably believe that not-p. My thesis is that we react emotionally to stories because we do believe what stories tell (...)
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  3. On Locke's Argument for Government.David B. Suits - 1977 - Journal of Libertarian Studies 1 (1):195-203.
     
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  4.  9
    Life, Death, and Meaning: Key Philosophical Readings on the Big Questions.Margaret A. Boden, Richard B. Brandt, Peter Caldwell, Fred Feldman, John Martin Fischer, Richard Hare, David Hume, W. D. Joske, Immanuel Kant, Frederick Kaufman, James Lenman, John Leslie, Steven Luper-Foy, Michaelis Michael, Thomas Nagel, Robert Nozick, Derek Parfit, George Pitcher, Stephen E. Rosenbaum, David Schmidtz, Arthur Schopenhauer, David B. Suits, Richard Taylor & Bernard Williams - 2004 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Do our lives have meaning? Should we create more people? Is death bad? Should we commit suicide? Would it be better if we were immortal? Should we be optimistic or pessimistic? Life, Death, and Meaning brings together key readings, primarily by English-speaking philosophers, on such 'big questions.'.
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  5. Death and Other Nothings.David B. Suits - 2012 - Philosophical Forum 43 (2):215-230.
  6.  3
    Life, Death, and Meaning: Key Philosophical Readings on the Big Questions.David Benatar, Margaret A. Boden, Peter Caldwell, Fred Feldman, John Martin Fischer, Richard Hare, David Hume, W. D. Joske, Immanuel Kant, Frederick Kaufman, James Lenman, John Leslie, Steven Luper, Michaelis Michael, Thomas Nagel, Robert Nozick, Derek Parfit, George Pitcher, Stephen E. Rosenbaum, David Schmidtz, Arthur Schopenhauer, David B. Suits, Richard Taylor, Bruce N. Waller & Bernard Williams (eds.) - 2004 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Do our lives have meaning? Should we create more people? Is death bad? Should we commit suicide? Would it be better to be immortal? Should we be optimistic or pessimistic? Since Life, Death, and Meaning: Key Philosophical Readings on the Big Questions first appeared, David Benatar's distinctive anthology designed to introduce students to the key existential questions of philosophy has won a devoted following among users in a variety of upper-level and even introductory courses.
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  7.  27
    Epictetus: His Continuing Influence and Contemporary Relevance.Dane R. Gordon & David B. Suits (eds.) - 2014 - RIT Press.
    Epictetus was born a slave. His master, Epaphroditus, allowed him to attend the lectures of the Stoic philosopher Musonius Rufus and later gave him his freedom. From numerous references in his Discourses it is clear that Epictetus valued freedom as a precious possession. He would have been on the side of the many people living now who, while not actually enslaved, are denied true freedom by the harsh circumstances of their lives. Epictetus's teachings about freedom and human dignity have echoed (...)
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  8. Lucretius: His Continuing Influence and Contemporary Relevance.Tim Madigan & David B. Suits (eds.) - 2011 - Rit Cary Graphic Arts Press.
    The essays in this collection deal with Greek philosopher Lucretius's critique of religion, his critique of traditional attitudes about death, and his influences on later thinkers such as Isaac Newton and Alfred Tennyson. 144 pp.
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  9. New Essays on Adam Smith's Moral Philosophy.Wade L. Robison & David B. Suits (eds.) - 2012 - Rit Press.
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  10.  5
    Epictetus: His Continuing Influence and Contemporary Relevance.Dane R. Gordon & David B. Suits (eds.) - 2014 - Rit Press.
    Epictetus was born a slave. His master, Epaphroditus, allowed him to attend the lectures of the Stoic philosopher Musonius Rufus and later gave him his freedom. From numerous references in his Discourses it is clear that Epictetus valued freedom as a precious possession. He would have been on the side of the many people living now who, while not actually enslaved, are denied true freedom by the harsh circumstances of their lives. Epictetus's teachings about freedom and human dignity have echoed (...)
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  11.  21
    Fictional Characters Are Just Like Us.David B. Suits - 1994 - Philosophy and Literature 18 (1):105-108.
  12.  21
    Steep Cliff Arguments.David B. Suits - 1999 - Argumentation 13 (2):127-138.
    In recent philosophical debates a number of arguments have been used which have so much in common that it is useful to study them as having a similar structure. Many arguments – Searle's Chinese Room, for example – make use of thought experiments in which we are told a story or given a narrative context such that we feel we are in comfortable surroundings. A new notion is then introduced which clashes with our ordinary habits and associations. As a result, (...)
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  13. Out of the Chinese Room.David B. Suits - 1989 - Computing and Philosophy Newsletter 4:1-7.
     
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