6 found
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  1.  28
    Dwelling within: The inhabited ruins of history1.Dariusz Gafijczuk - 2013 - History and Theory 52 (2):149-170.
    Addressing the recent call to rethink history as a form of presence, the essay works toward a recovery of a space in which such presence of history is encoded. I argue that history as a form of active perception is akin to virtual witnessing of the past in the moment of our encounter with historical artifacts, be they texts, photographs, or buildings.To this end, I engage with the conceptual and material aspects of historical perception, deriving a model of history as (...)
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  2.  9
    Crisis, Experience, ‘Excentricity’.Dariusz Gafijczuk - 2024 - Theory, Culture and Society 41 (3):55-69.
    This paper explores the relationship between crisis and experience, concentrating on ‘excentric positionality’ in relation to the shared world, as presented in the work of Helmuth Plessner. A by-product of the 1920s Weimar Germany, Plessner’s philosophical anthropology, it is argued, presents us with a forgotten blueprint for transitive and compositional approaches to the social world. Instead of the familiar ‘crisis of experience’ used to diagnose ‘what has gone wrong’, it allows us to re-learn how to work with ‘the experience of (...)
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  3.  47
    Central europe — between presence and absence the architectonics of blur in loos, Schoenberg, and janáček.Dariusz Gafijczuk - 2013 - Common Knowledge 19 (3):530-550.
    This contribution to the Common Knowledge symposium “Fuzzy Studies” considers how the ultramodernist aesthetics of Central Europe has related to and reacted against the region's political history and cartography. Central Europe has been a rich source of “soluble” realities that can be observed as they emerge, mature, and rapidly decay. Central European modernism, represented here by Adolf Loos in architecture and by Arnold Schoenberg and Leoš Janáček in music, experimented with blurry regions between presence and absence, light and shadow, sound (...)
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  4.  20
    Resonant Topographies: Central Europe’s Paradoxical Middle.Dariusz Gafijczuk - 2012 - Theory, Culture and Society 29 (3):52-71.
    The article employs music to describe the dynamics of Central European identity at the turn of the 20th century. Conceptually, the analysis is based on the notion of cultural resonance and the distinction between political territories, which isolate identity, and cultural landscapes which let it escape. This theoretical understanding is derived from the acoustic philosophy and musical practice of two Central European composers, Leoš Janáček and Béla Bartók. Exemplified here is artistic ‘extra-territorial’ identity, which is indeed how Theodor Adorno at (...)
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  5.  24
    The way of the social: from Durkheim’s society to a postmodern sociality.Dariusz Gafijczuk - 2005 - History of the Human Sciences 18 (3):17-33.
    This article investigates the meaning of the ‘social’ based on Durkheim’s philosophy of society as a ‘collective representation’. I argue that the social, the way Durkheim formulates it, is an abstract sign for reality, a metaphor, which operates on the level of language. Because of this fact, the ‘social’ is from the start limited in its functionality as a descriptor, but it also contains within its own linguistic form, in its word, the possibility of renewal and renaming that is the (...)
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  6.  42
    Introduction: Bland Blur.Jeffrey M. Perl, Tim Beasley-Murray, Ardis Butterfield, Gerard Wiegers, Andrew J. Nicholson, Johan Elverskog, Daniel J. Sharfstein & Dariusz Gafijczuk - 2013 - Common Knowledge 19 (3):411-423.
    This essay, by the editor of Common Knowledge, introduces the sixth and final installment of “Fuzzy Studies,” the journal's “Symposium on the Consequence of Blur.” Suggesting that “Fuzzy Studies” should be understood in the context of a desultory campaign against zeal conducted in the journal for almost twenty years, he explains that the editors' assumption has been that any authentic case for the less adamant modes of thinking, or the less focused ways of seeing, needs to be unenthusiastic and carefully (...)
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