Results for 'Daoism'

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  1. A Daoist Theory of Chinese Thought: A Philosophical Interpretation.Chad Hansen - 1992 - Oxford University Press.
    This ambitious book presents a new interpretation of Chinese thought guided both by a philosopher's sense of mystery and by a sound philosophical theory of meaning. That dual goal, Hansen argues, requires a unified translation theory. It must provide a single coherent account of the issues that motivated both the recently untangled Chinese linguistic analysis and the familiar moral-political disputes. Hansen's unified approach uncovers a philosophical sophistication in Daoism that traditional accounts have overlooked. The Daoist theory treats the imperious (...)
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  2.  93
    Daoism and Environmental Philosophy: Nourishing Life.Eric S. Nelson - 2020 - London, UK: Routledge.
    Daoism and Environmental Philosophy explores ethics and the philosophy of nature in the Daodejing, the Zhuangzi, and related texts to elucidate their potential significance in our contemporary environmental crisis. This book traces early Daoist depictions of practices of embodied emptying and forgetting and communicative strategies of undoing the fixations of words, things, and the embodied self. These are aspects of an ethics of embracing plainness and simplicity, nourishing the asymmetrically differentiated yet shared elemental body of life of the myriad (...)
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  3. Daoism and Chinese Martial Arts.Barry Allen - 2014 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 13 (2):251-266.
    The now-global phenomenon of Asian martial arts traces back to something that began in China. The idea the Chinese communicated was the dual cultivation of the spiritual and the martial, each perfected in the other, with the proof of perfection being an effortless mastery of violence. I look at one phase of the interaction between Asian martial arts and Chinese thought, with a reading of the Zhuangzi 莊子 and the Daodejing 道德經 from a martial arts perspective. I do not claim (...)
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  4.  59
    Daoism, Nature and Humanity.David E. Cooper - 2014 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 74:95-108.
    This paper sympathetically explores Daoism's relevance to environmental philosophy and to the aspiration of people to live in a manner convergent with nature. After discussing the Daoist understanding of nature and the dao (Way), the focus turns to the implications of these notions for our relationship to nature. The popular idea that Daoism encourages a return to a way of life is rejected. Instead, it is shown that the Daoist proposal is one of living more than people generally (...)
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  5.  26
    Daoist Onto - Un - Learning as a Radical Form of Study : Re-Imagining Study and Learning From an Eastern Perspective.Weili Zhao - 2019 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 38 (3):261-273.
    Within educational philosophy and theory, there has been an international re-turn to envision study as an alternative formation to disrupt the defining learning logic. As an enrichment, this paper articulates “Daoist onto-un-learning” as an Eastern form of study, drawing upon Roger Ames’s interpretation of the ancient Chinese correlative cosmology and relational personhood thinking. This articulation is to dialogue with the conceptualizations of study shared by Giorgio Agamben, Derek Ford, and Tyson Lewis, and unfolds in three steps. First, I examine how (...)
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  6.  17
    A Daoist Theory of Chinese Thought: A Philosophical Interpretation.Chad Hansen.Bryan W. Van Norden - 1995 - Ethics 105 (2):433-435.
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  7.  96
    Daoism Explained: From the Dream of the Butterfly to the Fishnet Allegory.Hans-Georg Moeller - 2004 - Open Court.
    The book also sheds new light on many important allegories by showing how modern translations often conceal the wit and humor of the Chinese original.
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  8.  16
    Daoism in Management.Alicia Hennig - 2017 - Philosophy of Management 16 (2):161-182.
    The paper concentrates on the Chinese philosophical strand of Daoism and analyses in how far this philosophy can contribute to new directions in management theory. Daoism is an ancient Chinese philosophy, which can only be traced back roughly to about 200 or 100 BC when during Han dynasty the writers Laozi and Zhuangzi were identified as “Daoists”. However, during Han dynasty Daoism and prevalent Confucianism intermingled. Generally, it is rather difficult today to clearly discern Daoist thought from (...)
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  9.  44
    Daoist Criticisms of Confucian Sacrificial Rites.Hans-Georg Moeller - 2012 - Sophia 51 (2):283-292.
    Various passages in the Laozi and the Zhuangzi, the two most important texts of “philosophical Daoism,” critically mock Confucian sacrificial rites. Perhaps the best known of these criticisms refers to a practice involving straw dogs. This article will attempt to expose the philosophical dimensions of these passages that show, in my reading, how Daoist philosophy looks at such sacrificial rituals as a sort of evidence of the Confucian misconceptions of time, of death and life, and of cosmic and social (...)
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  10.  68
    Daoism and Disability.Andrew Lambert - 2016 - In Darla Y. Schumm & Michael Stoltzfus (eds.), Disability and World Religions: An Introduction. Baylor University Press.
    Ideas found in the early Daoist texts can inform current debates about disability, since the latter often involve assumptions about personhood and agency that Daoist texts do not share. The two canonical texts of classical Daoism, the Daodejing and the Zhuangzi, do not explicitly discuss disability as an object of theory or offer a model of it. They do, however, provide conceptual resources that can enrich contemporary discussions of disability. Two particular ideas are discussed here. Classical Daoist thinking about (...)
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  11. Daoism, Humanity, and the Way of Heaven.Ian James Kidd - 2020 - Religious Studies 56:111-126.
    I argue that Zhuangist Daoism manifests what I label the spiritual aspiration to emulation, and then use this to challenge some of John Cottingham's attempts to confine authentic spiritual experience to theistic traditions.
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  12.  28
    Daoist Philosophy.Ronnie Littlejohn - 2016 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Daoist Philosophy Along with Confucianism, “Daoism” is one of the two great indigenous philosophical traditions of China. As an English term, Daoism corresponds to both Daojia, an early Han dynasty term which describes so-called “philosophical” texts and thinkers such as Laozi and … Continue reading Daoist Philosophy →.
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  13. A Daoist Model For A Kantian Church.Stephen R. Palmquist - 2013 - Comparative Philosophy 4 (2):67-89.
    Although significant differences undoubtedly exist between Daoism and Kant’s philosophy, the two systems also have some noteworthy similarities. After calling attention to a few such parallels and sketching the outlines of Kant’s philosophy of religion, this article focuses on an often-neglected feature of the latter: the four guiding principles of what Kant calls an “invisible church”. Numerous passages from Lao Zi’s classic text, Dao-De-Jing, seem to uphold these same principles, thus suggesting that they can also be interpreted as core (...)
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  14.  29
    Daoist Conception of Time: Is Time Merely a Mental Construction?Nihel Jhou - 2020 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 19 (4):583-599.
    There have been very few studies of the Daoist conception of time in either the West or the East. The only explicit study on this topic in the English literature is David Chai’s (2014). Chai maintains that “human measured time” manifested in myriad things in the Daoist universe is merely a mental construction, whereas the authentic time is cosmological time, which consists of neither an A-series (which is ordered by non-reducible pastness, presentness, and futurity) nor a B-series (which is ordered (...)
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  15.  48
    Daoism as Critical Theory.Mario Wenning - 2011 - Comparative Philosophy 2 (2):50.
    Classical philosophical Daoism as it is expressed in the Dao-De-Jing and the Zhuang-Zi is often interpreted as lacking a capacity for critique and resistance. Since these capacities are taken to be central components of Enlightenment reason and action, it would follow that Daoism is incompatible with Enlightenment. This interpretation is being refuted by way of developing a constructive dialogue between the enlightenment traditions of critical theory and recent philosophy of action from a Daoist perspective. Daoism's normative naturalism (...)
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  16. Daoism, Meditation, and the Wonders of Serenity: From the Latter Han Dynasty (25-220) to the Tang Dynasty.Stephen Eskildsen - 2015 - State University of New York Press.
    _An overview of Daoist texts on passive meditation from the Latter Han through Tang periods._.
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  17.  23
    An Introduction to Daoist Philosophies.Steve Coutinho - 2013 - Columbia University Press.
    Coutinho respects the multiplicity of Daoist philosophies while also revealing a distinctive philosophical sensibility, and he provides clear explanations of these complex texts without resorting to oversimplification.
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  18.  78
    Daoist Presentation and Persuasion: Wandering Among Zhuangzi's Kinds of Language.Lee H. Yearley - 2005 - Journal of Religious Ethics 33 (3):503 - 535.
    A concern central to virtually all full-blooded instances of religious ethics is how persuasively to represent a world central to our fulfillment that far exceeds our normal understanding. The treatment of three kinds of language in an early Daoist text, the Zhuangzi (Chuang Tzu), contains an especially profound discussion and expression of such persuasive presentations in religious ethics. This study examines it and concludes by viewing Dante's Commedia through the perspectives Zhuangzi's ideas and practices present.
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  19. Meontological Generativity: A Daoist Reading of the Thing.David Chai - 2014 - Philosophy East and West 64 (2):303-318.
    This paper relocates the philosophical discourse on the Thing (das Ding) to the world of classical Daoism. In doing so, it explores the bond between the One, the Thing and its signifier before discussing how the Thing unveils itself to the world while receiving the gift of nothingness from Dao. It furthermore contends that the two most prominent discussions of the Thing in the Western tradition--those by Heidegger and Lacan--while philosophically valuable in their own right, fail to provide the (...)
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  20. Responding with Dao : Early Daoist Ethics and the Environment.Eric Sean Nelson - 2009 - Philosophy East and West 59 (3):pp. 294-316.
    Early Daoism, as articulated in the Daodejing and the Zhuangzi, indirectly addresses environmental issues by intimating a non-reductive naturalistic ethics calling on humans to be open and responsive to the specificities and interconnections of the world and environment to which they belong. "Dao" is not a substantial immanent or transcendent entity but the lived enactment of the intrinsic worth of the "myriad things" and the natural world occurring through how humans address and are addressed by them. Early Daoism (...)
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  21.  43
    Daoism and Wu.David Chai - 2014 - Philosophy Compass 9 (10):663-671.
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  22.  23
    Daoist Metaethics.Jason Dockstader - 2019 - Journal of Value Inquiry 53 (2):309-324.
    This paper seeks to show how classical Chinese Daoist philosophy (道家) contributes to contemporary metaethics. Daoism offers an early form of moral error theory and provides unique suggestions for what one can do with a false discourse like morality. Recent error theorists have disagreed about whether they should conserve moral discourse (moral conservationism), retain it only as a useful fiction (revolutionary moral fictionalism), substitute it with a discourse concerned with subjective normative attitudes (moral substitutionism), or abolish it altogether (assertive (...)
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  23.  49
    Is Daoism 'Green'?David E. Cooper - 1994 - Asian Philosophy 4 (2):119 – 125.
    Abstract Contemporary advocates of ?deep ecology? often appeal to daoist ideals as an early expression of ?respect? for nature. This appeal is inspired, presumably, by daoist attacks on ?convention? or ?artifice? which, as Zhuang Zi puts it, ?has been the ruin of primordial nature ... the ruin of the world?. But there are problems with this appeal. Daoists are extremely selective in the aspects of nature which they admire, and it is as much the skilled artisan as the person ?at (...)
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  24.  19
    Daoist Ci, Feminist Ethics of Care, and the Dilemma of Nature.Ann A. Pang-White - 2016 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 43 (3-4):275-294.
    In recent discussion on comparative ethics, extensive scholarship has been devoted to a comparative study of Confucian ren 仁 (often translated as humaneness or benevolence) and feminist ethics of care, while such cross‐cultural study on the Daoist concept of ci 慈 (customarily translated as compassion) and its intersection with care ethics has been lacking. This paper explores the reasons and concludes that Daoists do care. However, their conception of care goes beyond the Confucian ren and pure care ethics or even (...)
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  25. The Darker Side of Daoist Primitivism.Hagop Sarkissian - 2010 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 37 (2):312-329.
    The Primitivist (responsible for chapters 8-11 of the heterogeneous Zhuangzi) has largely been interpreted as just another exponent of the philosophy of the Laozi or Daodejing. This is a shame, because the Primitivist is an idiosyncratic thinker whose theories do not simply reiterate those found in the Laozi. In this essay, I argue that even though the Primitivist embraced some of the values of the Laozi’s brand of Daoism, (e.g. simplicity, harmony with nature, being rid of knowledge, etc.) he (...)
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  26. A Daoist Critique of Searle on Mind and Action.Joel Krueger - 2008 - In Bo Mou (ed.), Searle’s Philosophy and Chinese Philosophy: Constructive Engagement. Brill Academic Publishers. pp. 97-123.
  27.  45
    Can a Daoist Sage Have Close Relationships with Other Human Beings?Joanna Iwanowska - 2017 - Diametros 52:23-46.
    This paper explores the compatibility between the Daoist art of emptying one’s heart-mind and the art of creating close relationships. The fact that a Daoist sage is characterized by an empty heart-mind makes him somewhat different from an average human being: since a full heart-mind is characteristic of the human condition, the sage transcends what makes us human. This could alienate him from others and make him incapable of developing close relationships. The research goal of this paper is to investigate (...)
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  28.  8
    Daoism: An Introduction.Ronnie L. Littlejohn - 2009 - I.B. Tauris.
    "Littlejohn organizes his introduction around the central metaphor of a spreading kudzu vine, whose roots, trunk, stalks, branches, and leaves grow beneath, in, around, and over the vast and complex terrain of Chinese culture. He does a marvellous job exploring the origins, developments, and transformations of Daoism by guiding readers through canonical texts, across historical contexts, and around expressions of Daoism in fine art, popular symbols, literature, ritual, and other forms of material culture. The result is a masterful (...)
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  29. Daoism and Confucianism.Karyn L. Lai - 2014 - In Xiaogan Liu (ed.), Dao Companion to Daoist Philosophy. Springer. pp. 489-511.
  30.  6
    The Influence of Daoism, Chan Buddhism, and Confucianism on the Theory and Practice of East Asian Martial Arts.Anton Sukhoverkhov, A. A. Klimenko & A. S. Tkachenko - 2021 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 48 (2):235-246.
    ABSTRACT This paper discusses the impact of East Asian philosophical ideas on the origins and development of martial arts. The article argues that the ideas of Daoist philosophy were developed into ‘soft styles’ or ‘internal schools’ that are based on the doctrine of ‘wuwei’ which follows the path of Yin. These styles are in opposition to ‘external’ or ‘hard styles’ of martial arts that follow the path of Yang. Daoist philosophy of ‘ziran’ influenced ‘animal’ or ‘imitation styles’ and the paradigm (...)
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  31. Well-Being and Daoism.Justin Tiwald - 2015 - In Guy Fletcher (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Well-Being. Routledge. pp. 56-69.
    In this chapter, I explicate several general views and arguments that bear on the notion and contemporary theories of human welfare, as found in two foundational Daoist texts, the Daodejing and the Zhuangzi. Ideas drawn from the Daodejing include its objections to desire theories of human welfare and its distinction between natural and acquired desires. Insights drawn from the Zhuangzi include its arguments against the view that death is bad for the dead, its attempt to develop a workable theory of (...)
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  32.  4
    Daoism and Environmental Philosophy: Nourishing Life by Eric S. Nelson.Dawid Rogacz - 2021 - Ethics and the Environment 26 (1):141-147.
    It is widely observed that Asian traditions of thought contain the conceptual resources for environmental ethics. Most studies have been devoted to Buddhist environmental ethics, but there have also been monographs that examined its presence in Hinduism, Jainism, and Neo-Confucianism. Quite surprisingly, prior to 2020, there had been no book that explored the most radical and consistently non-anthropocentric form of Asian environmental ethics, namely that of the Daoists. Previous studies analyzed Daoist ecology in general and focused on its manifestation in (...)
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  33.  22
    Acting Without Regarding: Daoist Self-Cultivation as Education for Non-Dichotomous Thinking.Joseph Emmanuel D. Sta Maria - 2017 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 49 (12):1216-1224.
    In this article, I show how resources for an education for non-dichotomous thinking can be drawn from the two Daoist texts, the Daodejing and the Zhuangzi. Dichotomous thinking can be defined as thinking that considers things in terms of strict and even irreconcilable dichotomous oppositions. The authors of the Daodejing and the Zhuangzi are known for their criticism of such dichotomous thinking. At the same time however, these authors seem to fall into this very kind of thinking which they criticize. (...)
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  34.  66
    Teaching Daoism as Philosophy: Teaching Thinking Through Controversy.Alan Fox - 2007 - Teaching Philosophy 30 (1):1-28.
    I propose to consider chapter 1 of the famous, classic, and foundational Daoist text Dao De Jing, attributed to Laozi, in order to enable a non-expert to negotiate the subject of Daoism in a global philosophy context, and to further enhance the teaching of philosophy by introducing and emphasizing at least some of the controversies that inevitably surround interpretation of a classical set of texts and ideas. This forces students to see through simplistic dichotomies and form subtler conclusions, on (...)
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  35.  26
    Daoist Presentation and Persuasion Wandering Among Zhuangzi's Kinds of Language.Lee H. Yearley - 2005 - Journal of Religious Ethics 33 (3):503-535.
    A concern central to virtually all full-blooded instances of religious ethics is how persuasively to represent a world central to our fulfillment that far exceeds our normal understanding. The treatment of three kinds of language in an early Daoist text, the Zhuangzi, contains an especially profound discussion and expression of such persuasive presentations in religious ethics. This study examines it and concludes by viewing Dante's Commedia through the perspectives Zhuangzi's ideas and practices present.
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  36.  35
    Daoist Patterns of Thought and the Tradition of Chinese Metaphysics.Zhu Bokun - 1998 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 29 (3):13-71.
    As one of the three systems of China's traditional culture, Daoism has an important place in the history of Chinese philosophy. Based on the ideas of inaction performing all, the Way modeling spontaneity, and the dialectic of you [having, being] and wu [lacking, nonbeing], this article is a systematic exploration of Laozi's philosophy of denial, spontaneity, and atheism, as well as of the deep and lasting influence of his metaphysical principles on all schools of traditional Chinese philosophy.
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  37.  50
    Musement as Listening: Daoist Perspectives on Peirce.Michael L. Raposa - 2012 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 39 (2):207-221.
    Certain Daoist ideas explored here are compared with features of Peirce's philosophy, supplying a helpful perspective on the latter. In particular, I examine Zhuangzi's instruction about “listening” with one's spirit, along with certain discussions of “listening energy” drawn from texts dealing with the Daoist martial arts. I argue that Daoist “listening” and Peirce's concept of “musement” are both to be regarded as a disciplined form of attentiveness. By attending to no predetermined thing, a person thus disciplined is “ready” for the (...)
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  38. Ancient Daoist Philosophy and Authentic Living.Robert Santee - 2011 - In Livia Kohn (ed.), Living Authentically: Daoist Contributions to Modern Psychology/ Edited by Livia Kohn. Three Pines Press.
  39. Daoism: A Contemporary Philosophical Investigation.Livia Kohn - 2019 - Routledge.
    Daoism: A Contemporary Philosophical Investigationexplores philosophy of religion from a Daoist perspective. Philosophy of religion is a thriving field today, increasingly expanding from its traditional theistic, Christian roots into more cosmologically oriented Asian religions. This book raises a number of different issues on the three levels of cosmos, individual, and society, and addresses key questions like: What are the distinctive characteristics of Daoist thought and cosmology? How does it approach problems of creation, body, mind, and society? What, ultimately, is (...)
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  40. Daoist Identity: History, Lineage, and Ritual.Livia Kohn & Harold D. Roth (eds.) - 2002 - University of Hawaii Press.
    Daoist Identity is an exploration of the various means by which Daoists over the centuries have created an identity for themselves. Using modern sociological studies of identity formation as its foundation, it brings together a representative sample of in-depth analyses by eminent American and Japanese scholars in the field. The discussion begins with critical examinations of the ways identity was found among the early movements of the Way of Great Peace and the Celestial Masters. The role of sacred texts and (...)
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  41.  1
    Daoism and Environmental Philosophy: Nourishing Life by Eric S. Nelson.Anish Mishra - 2022 - Philosophy East and West 72 (2):1-6.
    In a time when the signs of a looming climate crisis have become increasingly evident, Eric Nelson’s work is a timely and relevant book. While dealing with theoretical questions, the book is also grounded in the empirical happenings of a global world order intertwined with human-induced climate change. Yet what is perhaps more significant is that it examines the way humans perceive nature, not as an atomic individualized activity but rather as envisioned and enacted through relations with the environment.In his (...)
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  42.  35
    Why Daoism is Not Environmentalism.Paul R. Goldin - 2005 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 32 (1):75–87.
  43.  20
    A Daoist Way of Being: Clarity and Stillness as Embodied Practice.Louis Komjathy - 2019 - Asian Philosophy 29 (1):50-64.
    ABSTRACTDaoism, especially classical Daoism, is often constructed as a ‘philosophy,’ ‘set of ideas,’ or ‘system of thought.’ This is particularly the case in studies of Chinese philosophy and comparative philosophy. The present article draws attention to the central importance of clarity and stillness as a Daoist form of meditative practice, contemplative experience, and way of being. Examining historical precedents in classical Daoism, the article gives particular attention to the Tang dynasty ‘Clarity-and-Stillness Literature,’ specifically the eighth-century Qingjing jing 清靜經. (...)
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  44.  22
    Introduction: Daoism and Hermeneutics.Friederike Assandri - 2010 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 37 (3):341-345.
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  45.  29
    Daoism and Chinese Culture.Robert Ford Campany & Livia Kohn - 2003 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 123 (2):408.
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  46.  41
    An Introduction to Daoist Thought: Action, Language, and Ethics in Zhuangzi.Eske Møllgaard - 2007 - Routledge.
    This is the first work available in English which addresses Zhuangzi’s thought as a whole. It presents an interpretation of the Zhuangzi, a book in thirty-three chapters that is the most important collection of Daoist texts in early China. The author introduces a complex reading that shows the unity of Zhuangzi’s thought, in particular in his views of action, language, and ethics. By addressing methodological questions that arise in reading Zhuangzi, a hermeneutics is developed which makes understanding Zhuangzi’s religious thought (...)
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  47.  3
    Daoist Ecofeminism as a New Democracy: An Analysis of Patriarchy in Contemporary China and a Tentative Solution.Jing Liu - 2022 - Hypatia 37 (2):276-292.
    The pain caused by the patriarchal totalitarianism of different modern political regimes is felt by everyone in our time: poverty, unemployment, high exploitation of both nature and humans, systematic oppression, persecution and domination, and pollution that threatens human existence. This article analyzes the different forms of patriarchy in contemporary China and explores a feminist way out. The first part examines how modern patriarchy unfolds itself through the land-enclosure movement that has caused serious pollution in China. I will show that the (...)
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  48. Daoism (Ii) : Zhuang Zi and the Zhuang-Zi.Vincent Shen - 2008 - In Bo Mou (ed.), Routledge History of Chinese Philosophy. Routledge.
     
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  49.  16
    Neo‐Daoism and Neo‐Confucianism: Three Common Themes.Zhu Hanmin - 2018 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 45 (1-2):119-124.
    This paper presents the thesis that Neo-Confucianism and Neo-Daoism have shared basic unity concerning the following three themes: the inner logic of the life world, spiritual world and personality ideal; the intrinsic logic of the learning of body and mind; and the inner logic of textual interpretation methods. This is a deepening process from historical phenomena to philosophy and to the interpretation of classics.
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  50.  1
    An Introduction to Daoist Thought: Action, Language, and Ethics in Zhuangzi.Eske Mollgaard - 2011 - Routledge.
    This is the first work available in English which addresses Zhuangzi’s thought as a whole. It presents an interpretation of the Zhuangzi, a book in thirty-three chapters that is the most important collection of Daoist texts in early China. The author introduces a complex reading that shows the unity of Zhuangzi’s thought, in particular in his views of action, language, and ethics. By addressing methodological questions that arise in reading Zhuangzi, a hermeneutics is developed which makes understanding Zhuangzi’s religious thought (...)
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