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Danielle Ko [3]Danielle N. Ko [1]
  1.  5
    Junior Doctors and Conscientious Objection to Voluntary Assisted Dying: Ethical Complexity in Practice.Rosalind J. McDougall, Ben P. White, Danielle Ko, Louise Keogh & Lindy Willmott - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 48 (8):517-521.
    In jurisdictions where voluntary assisted dying is legal, eligibility assessments, prescription and administration of a VAD substance are commonly performed by senior doctors. Junior doctors’ involvement is limited to a range of more peripheral aspects of patient care relating to VAD. In the Australian state of Victoria, where VAD has been legal since June 2019, all health professionals have a right under the legislation to conscientiously object to involvement in the VAD process, including provision of information about VAD. While this (...)
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  2.  16
    Balancing Health Worker Well-Being and Duty to Care: An Ethical Approach to Staff Safety in COVID-19 and Beyond.Rosalind J. McDougall, Lynn Gillam, Danielle Ko, Isabella Holmes & Clare Delany - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (5):318-323.
    The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the risks that can be involved in healthcare work. In this paper, we explore the issue of staff safety in clinical work using the example of personal protective equipment in the COVID-19 crisis. We articulate some of the specific ethical challenges around PPE currently being faced by front-line clinicians, and develop an approach to staff safety that involves balancing duty to care and personal well-being. We describe each of these values, and present a decision-making framework (...)
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    Eligibility and Access to Voluntary Assisted Dying: A View From Victoria, Australia.Rosalind J. McDougall & Danielle Ko - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (10):676-677.
    In their analysis of the eligibility criteria for assisted dying in Canada, Downie and Schuklenk put forward a strong argument for the ethical defensibility of including mental illnesses and disabilities as underlying conditions driving a person’s request for assisted dying.1 In this commentary, we add a view on these debates from our home state of Victoria, Australia, where voluntary assisted dying has been legal since June 2019. We highlight the more conservative approach to eligibility in our setting compared with Canada, (...)
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    Anticipated Impacts of Voluntary Assisted Dying Legislation on Nursing Practice.Jessica T. Snir, Danielle N. Ko, Bridget Pratt & Rosalind McDougall - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (6):1386-1400.
    Background: The Voluntary Assisted Dying Act 2017 passed into law in Victoria, Australia, on the 29 November 2017. Internationally, nurses have been shown to be intimately involved in patient care throughout the voluntary assisted dying process. However, there is a paucity of research exploring Australian nurses’ perspectives on voluntary assisted dying and, in particular, how Victorian nurses anticipate the implementation of this ethically controversial legislation will impact their professional lives. Objectives: To explore Victorian nurses’ expectations of the ethical and practical (...)
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