6 found
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  1.  54
    The Effects of Feature-Label-Order and Their Implications for Symbolic Learning.Michael Ramscar, Daniel Yarlett, Melody Dye, Katie Denny & Kirsten Thorpe - 2010 - Cognitive Science 34 (6):909-957.
    Symbols enable people to organize and communicate about the world. However, the ways in which symbolic knowledge is learned and then represented in the mind are poorly understood. We present a formal analysis of symbolic learning—in particular, word learning—in terms of prediction and cue competition, and we consider two possible ways in which symbols might be learned: by learning to predict a label from the features of objects and events in the world, and by learning to predict features from a (...)
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  2.  8
    One‐year‐old infants use teleological representations of actions productively.Michael Ramscar, Daniel Yarlett, Shimon Edelman, Nathan Intrator, Gergely Csibra, Szilvia Bıró, Orsolya Koós, György Gergely, Holk Cruse & Michael D. Lee - 2003 - Cognitive Science 27 (1):111-133.
    Two experiments investigated whether infants represent goal‐directed actions of others in a way that allows them to draw inferences to unobserved states of affairs (such as unseen goal states or occluded obstacles). We measured looking times to assess violation of infants' expectations upon perceiving either a change in the actions of computer‐animated figures or in the context of such actions. The first experiment tested whether infants would attribute a goal to an action that they had not seen completed. The second (...)
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  3.  45
    Linguistic Self‐Correction in the Absence of Feedback: A New Approach to the Logical Problem of Language Acquisition.Michael Ramscar & Daniel Yarlett - 2007 - Cognitive Science 31 (6):927-960.
    In a series of studies children show increasing mastery of irregular plural forms (such as mice) simply by producing erroneous over‐regularized versions of them (such as mouses). We explain this phenomenon in terms of successive approximation in imitation: Children over‐regularize early in acquisition because the representations of frequent, regular plural forms develop more quickly, such that at the earliest stages of production they interfere with children's attempts to imitatively reproduce irregular forms they have heard in the input. As the strength (...)
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  4.  36
    Semantic grounding in models of analogy: an environmental approach.Michael Ramscar & Daniel Yarlett - 2003 - Cognitive Science 27 (1):41-71.
    Empirical studies indicate that analogy consists of two main processes: retrieval and mapping. While current theories and models of analogy have revealed much about the mainly structural constraints that govern the mapping process, the similarities that underpin the correspondences between individual representational elements and drive retrieval are understood in less detail. In existing models symbol similarities are externally defined but neither empirically grounded nor theoretically justified. This paper introduces a new model (EMMA: the environmental model of analogy) which relies on (...)
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  5. The feature-label-order effect in symbolic learning.Michael Ramscar, Daniel Yarlett, Melody Dye & Nal Kalchbrenner - 2010 - Cognitive Science 34 (7).
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  6. Jesse J. Prinz, Furnishing the Mind: Concepts and their Perceptual Basis. Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, 2002. [REVIEW]Jonathan M. Weinberg, Daniel Yarlett, Michael Ramscar, Dan Ryder & Jesse J. Prinz - 2003 - Metascience 12 (3):279-303.