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Daniel W. Tigard [9]Daniel Tigard [7]
  1.  34
    There Is No Techno-Responsibility Gap.Daniel W. Tigard - 2020 - Philosophy and Technology 34 (3):589-607.
    In a landmark essay, Andreas Matthias claimed that current developments in autonomous, artificially intelligent systems are creating a so-called responsibility gap, which is allegedly ever-widening and stands to undermine both the moral and legal frameworks of our society. But how severe is the threat posed by emerging technologies? In fact, a great number of authors have indicated that the fear is thoroughly instilled. The most pessimistic are calling for a drastic scaling-back or complete moratorium on AI systems, while the optimists (...)
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  2.  35
    The Positive Value of Moral Distress.Daniel W. Tigard - 2019 - Bioethics 33 (5):601-608.
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  3.  34
    Taking the Blame: Appropriate Responses to Medical Error.Daniel W. Tigard - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (2):101-105.
    Medical errors are all too common. Ever since a report issued by the Institute of Medicine raised awareness of this unfortunate reality, an emerging theme has gained prominence in the literature on medical error. Fears of blame and punishment, it is often claimed, allow errors to remain undisclosed. Accordingly, modern healthcare must shift away from blame towards a culture of safety in order to effectively reduce the occurrence of error. Against this shift, I argue that it would serve the medical (...)
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  4.  27
    Rethinking Moral Distress: Conceptual Demands for a Troubling Phenomenon Affecting Health Care Professionals.Daniel W. Tigard - 2018 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 21 (4):479-488.
    Recent medical and bioethics literature shows a growing concern for practitioners’ emotional experience and the ethical environment in the workplace. Moral distress, in particular, is often said to result from the difficult decisions made and the troubling situations regularly encountered in health care contexts. It has been identified as a leading cause of professional dissatisfaction and burnout, which, in turn, contribute to inadequate attention and increased pain for patients. Given the natural desire to avoid these negative effects, it seems to (...)
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  5.  22
    Moral Distress as a Symptom of Dirty Hands.Daniel Tigard - 2019 - Res Publica 25 (3):353-371.
    The experience of ‘moral distress’ is an increasing focal point of contemporary medical and bioethics literature, yet it has received little attention in discussions intersecting with ethical theory. This is unfortunate, as it seems that the peculiar phenomenon may well help us to better understand a number of issues bearing both practical and theoretical significance. In this article, I provide a robust psychological profile of moral distress in order to shed a newfound light upon the longstanding problem of ‘dirty hands’. (...)
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  6.  13
    Socially Responsive Technologies: Toward a Co-Developmental Path.Daniel W. Tigard, Niël H. Conradie & Saskia K. Nagel - 2020 - AI and Society 35 (4):885-893.
    Robotic and artificially intelligent systems are becoming prevalent in our day-to-day lives. As human interaction is increasingly replaced by human–computer and human–robot interaction, we occasionally speak and act as though we are blaming or praising various technological devices. While such responses may arise naturally, they are still unusual. Indeed, for some authors, it is the programmers or users—and not the system itself—that we properly hold responsible in these cases. Furthermore, some argue that since directing blame or praise at technology itself (...)
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  7.  9
    Embedded Ethics Could Help Implement the Pipeline Model Framework for Machine Learning Healthcare Applications.Amelia Fiske, Daniel Tigard, Ruth Müller, Sami Haddadin, Alena Buyx & Stuart McLennan - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (11):32-35.
    The field of artificial intelligence ethics has exploded in recent years, with countless academics, organizations, and influencers rushing to consider how AI technology can be developed and im...
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  8. Moral Distress as a Symptom of Dirty Hands.Daniel Tigard - 2019 - Res Publica 25 (3):353-371.
    The experience of ‘moral distress’ is an increasing focal point of contemporary medical and bioethics literature, yet it has received little attention in discussions intersecting with ethical theory. This is unfortunate, as it seems that the peculiar phenomenon may well help us to better understand a number of issues bearing both practical and theoretical significance. In this article, I provide a robust psychological profile of moral distress in order to shed a newfound light upon the longstanding problem of ‘dirty hands’. (...)
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  9.  7
    Technological Answerability and the Severance Problem: Staying Connected by Demanding Answers.Daniel W. Tigard - 2021 - Science and Engineering Ethics 27 (5):1-20.
    Artificial intelligence and robotic technologies have become nearly ubiquitous. In some ways, the developments have likely helped us, but in other ways sophisticated technologies set back our interests. Among the latter sort is what has been dubbed the ‘severance problem’—the idea that technologies sever our connection to the world, a connection which is necessary for us to flourish and live meaningful lives. I grant that the severance problem is a threat we should mitigate and I ask: how can we stave (...)
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  10.  50
    Judicial Discretion and the Problem of Dirty Hands.Daniel Tigard - 2016 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 19 (1):177-192.
    H.L.A. Hart’s lost and found essay ‘Discretion’ has provided new insight into the issue of how legal systems can cope with indeterminacy in the law. The so-called ‘open texture’ of law calls for the exercise of judicial discretion, which, I argue, renders judges susceptible to the problem of dirty hands. To show this, I frame the problem as being open to an array of appropriate emotional responses, namely, various senses of guilt. With these responses in mind, I revise an example (...)
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  11.  12
    Emergency Preservation and Resuscitation Trial: A Philosophical Justification for Non‐Voluntary Enrollment.Daniel Tigard - 2016 - Bioethics 30 (4):344-352.
    In a current clinical trial for Emergency Preservation and Resuscitation, Dr. Samuel Tisherman of the University of Maryland aims to induce therapeutic hypothermia in order to ‘buy time’ for operating on victims of severe exsanguination. While recent publicity has framed this controversial procedure as ‘killing a patient to save his life’, the US Army and Acute Care Research appear to support the study on the grounds that such patients already face low chances of survival. Given that enrollment in the trial (...)
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  12.  7
    Emergency Preservation and Resuscitation Trial: A Philosophical Justification for Non‐Voluntary Enrollment.Daniel Tigard - 2016 - Bioethics 30 (5):344-352.
    In a current clinical trial for Emergency Preservation and Resuscitation, Dr. Samuel Tisherman of the University of Maryland aims to induce therapeutic hypothermia in order to ‘buy time’ for operating on victims of severe exsanguination. While recent publicity has framed this controversial procedure as ‘killing a patient to save his life’, the US Army and Acute Care Research appear to support the study on the grounds that such patients already face low chances of survival. Given that enrollment in the trial (...)
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  13.  4
    Embedded Ethics: A Proposal for Integrating Ethics Into the Development of Medical AI.Alena Buyx, Sami Haddadin, Ruth Müller, Daniel Tigard, Amelia Fiske & Stuart McLennan - 2022 - BMC Medical Ethics 23 (1):1-10.
    The emergence of ethical concerns surrounding artificial intelligence has led to an explosion of high-level ethical principles being published by a wide range of public and private organizations. However, there is a need to consider how AI developers can be practically assisted to anticipate, identify and address ethical issues regarding AI technologies. This is particularly important in the development of AI intended for healthcare settings, where applications will often interact directly with patients in various states of vulnerability. In this paper, (...)
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  14.  18
    Automation and Utopia: Human Flourishing in a World Without Work John Danaher, 2019 Cambridge, MA and London, England Harvard University Press. 336pp, $39.95 • £31.95 • €36.00. [REVIEW]Daniel W. Tigard - 2020 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 37 (4):684-687.
  15.  6
    Digital Twins Running Amok? Open Questions for the Ethics of an Emerging Medical Technology.Daniel W. Tigard - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (6):407-408.
    Digital twinning in medicine refers to the idea of simulating a person’s organs, muscles or perhaps their entire body, in order to arrive more effectively at accurate diagnoses, to make treatment recommendations that reflect chances of success and possible side-effects, and to better understand the long-term trajectory of an individual’s overall condition. Digital twins, in these ways, build on the recent movement toward personalised medicine,1 and they undoubtedly present us with exciting opportunities to advance our health. Of course, the opportunities (...)
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  16.  4
    Taking One for the Team: A Reiteration on the Role of Self-Blame After Medical Error.Daniel W. Tigard - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (5):342-344.
    In a critique of my work on ‘taking the blame’ as a response to medical errors, my position on the potential goods of individual responsibility and blame is challenged. It is suggested that medicine is a ‘team sport’ and several rich examples are provided to support the possible harms of practitioner self-blame. Yet, it appears that my critics have misunderstood my demands and to whom they are directed. With this response, I offer several clarifications of my account, as well as (...)
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