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  1.  85
    The nature of virtual communities.Daniel Memmi - 2006 - AI and Society 20 (3):288-300.
    The impressive development of electronic communication techniques has given rise to virtual communities. The nature of these computer-mediated communities has been the subject of much recent debate. Are they ordinary social groups in electronic form, or are they fundamentally different from traditional communities? Understanding virtual communities seems a prerequisite for the design of better communication systems. To clarify this debate, we will resort to the classical sociological distinction between small traditional communities (based on personal relations) and modern social groups (bound (...)
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  2.  33
    Information overload and virtual institutions.Daniel Memmi - 2014 - AI and Society 29 (1):75-83.
  3.  24
    Comparative foundations of Eastern and Western thought.Daniel Memmi - 2017 - AI and Society 32 (3):359-368.
    Modern science and technology originated in Western Europe within a specific culture, but they have now been adopted and developed by several Eastern countries as well. We analyze the features of Western culture that may explain the rise of modern science with its associated economic development. A comparative analysis of Eastern cultures will then help us evaluate how far could contemporary science be successfully integrated within very different cultures. Without denying the role of social and political institutions, we would like (...)
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  4.  42
    Cultural consequences of computing technology.Daniel Memmi - 2013 - AI and Society 28 (1):77-85.
    Computing technology is clearly a technical revolution but will most probably bring about a cultural revolution as well. The effects of this technology on human culture will be dramatic and far-reaching. Yet, computers and electronic networks are but the latest development in a long history of cognitive tools, such as writing and printing. We will examine this history, which exhibits long-term trends toward an increasing democratization of culture, before turning to today’s technology. Within this framework, we will analyze the probable (...)
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  5.  30
    A social contract for virtual institutions.Daniel Memmi - 2015 - AI and Society 30 (1):69-76.
  6.  66
    Connectionism and artificial intelligence as cognitive models.Daniel Memmi - 1990 - AI and Society 4 (2):115-136.
    The current renewal of connectionist techniques using networks of neuron-like units has started to have an influence on cognitive modelling. However, compared with classical artificial intelligence methods, the position of connectionism is still not clear. In this article artificial intelligence and connectionism are systematically compared as cognitive models so as to bring out the advantages and shortcomings of each. The problem of structured representations appears to be particularly important, suggesting likely research directions.
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  7.  16
    Data coding takes place within a context.Daniel Memmi - 1997 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (1):77-78.
    Recoding the data for relational learning is both easier and more difficult than it might appear. Human beings routinely find the appropriate representation for a given problem because coding always takes place within the framework of a domain, theory, or background knowledge. How this can be achieved is still highly speculative, but should probably be investigated with hybrid models.
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  8.  18
    Information technology as social phenomenon.Daniel Memmi - 2015 - AI and Society 30 (2):207-214.
  9.  50
    The relevance for science of Western and Eastern cultures.Daniel Memmi - 2019 - AI and Society 34 (3):599-608.
    The rise of modern science took place in Western Europe, and one may ask why this was the case. We analyze the roots of modern science by replacing scientific ideas within the framework of Western culture, notably the twin heritage of biblical thought and Greek philosophy. We also investigate Eastern traditions so as to highlight Western beliefs by comparison, and to argue for their relevance to contemporary science. Classical Western conceptions that fostered the rise of science are now largely obsolete, (...)
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