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Daniel I. Harris
Trent University
  1. Friendship as Shared Joy in Nietzsche.Daniel I. Harris - 2015 - Symposium: Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy/Revue canadienne de philosophie continentale 19 (1):199-221.
    Nietzsche criticizes the shared suffering of compassion as a basis for ethics, yet his challenge to overcome compassion seeks not to extinguish all fellow feeling but instead urges us to transform the way we relate to others, to learn to share not suffering but joy. For Schopenhauer, we act morally when we respond to another’s suffering, while we are mistrustful of the joys of others. Nietzsche turns to the type of relationality exempli!ied by friendship, understood as shared joy, in order (...)
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    Nietzsche on the Soul as a Political Structure.Daniel I. Harris - 2019 - Symposium 23 (1):260-280.
    A critic of metaphysically robust accounts of the human self, Nietzsche means not to do away with the self entirely, but to reimagine it. He pursues an account according to which the unity of the self is born out of a coherent organization of drives and yet is not something other than that organization. Readers of Nietzsche have pointed to a so-called “lack of fit” between this theoretical account of the self, according to which the self is nothing apart from (...)
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    Nietzsche on Honesty and the Will to Truth.Daniel I. Harris - 2020 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 51 (3):247-258.
    Nietzsche values intellectual honesty, but is dubious about what he calls the will to truth. This is puzzling since intellectual honesty is a component of the will to truth. In this paper, I show that this puzzle tells us something important about how Nietzsche conceives of our pursuit of truth. For Nietzsche, those who pursue truth occupy unstable ground, since being honest about the ultimate reasons for that pursuit would mean that truth could no longer satisfy the important human needs (...)
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    Nietzsche's Free Spirit Works: A Dialectical Reading by Matthew Meyer. [REVIEW]Daniel I. Harris - 2020 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 58 (4):827-828.
    Recent years have seen increased interest in Friedrich Nietzsche's middle period works, as scholars have turned to Human, All Too Human, Daybreak, and The Gay Science in exploring Nietzsche's turn toward naturalism and the roots of his mature criticisms of morality. Entering that conversation, Matthew Meyer offers an ambitious challenge to how we read these texts. Often viewed as a series of disconnected intellectual experiments that evince Nietzsche's rapid, not always linear, development over the period of their publication, the middle (...)
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    Nietzsche and Virtue.Daniel I. Harris - 2015 - Journal of Value Inquiry 49 (3):325-328.
    Representing a variety of interpretive strategies, and looking closely at a wide range of Nietzsche’s works, the papers in this issue are nevertheless united by a common concern to make clear whether and how our understanding of Nietzsche is improved by paying closer attention to his treatment of virtue. For Nietzsche’s overlapping projects of interrogating inherited values and of envisioning forms of human life outside of the present moral economy of guilt and retribution both grow out of concerns central to (...)
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  6. Nietzsche, Pragmatism, and Progress.Daniel I. Harris - 2010 - Etica E Politica 12 (2):338-354.
    If we think of political progress as indexed to some permanent standard, and then agree that it is Nietzsche who dispels the authority of any such standard, then we may perhaps conclude that after Nietzsche, progress is ruled out. I want to show, however, that we find in Nietzsche comfort for a continued vision of human progress through engaged political action. I suggest that we look to Derrida and Rorty as offering a view of a post-Nietzschean democracy the engine of (...)
     
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    The Nietzschean Self: Moral Psychology, Agency, and the Unconscious Paul Katsafanas Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016; 292 Pp.; $74.00. [REVIEW]Daniel I. Harris - 2018 - Dialogue 57 (1):185-186.
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