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Daniel S. Goldberg [34]Daniel Goldberg [6]Daniel E. Goldberg [2]
  1.  29
    Bioethics, (Funding) Priorities, and the Perpetuation of Injustice.Rachel Fabi & Daniel S. Goldberg - 2022 - American Journal of Bioethics 22 (1):6-13.
    If funding allocation is an indicator of a field’s priorities, then the priorities of the field of bioethics are misaligned because they perpetuate injustice. Social justice mandates priority for the factors that drive systematic disadvantage, which tend not to be the areas supported by funding within academic bioethics. Current funding priorities violate social justice by overemphasizing technologies that aim to enhance the human condition without addressing underlying structural inequalities grounded in racism, and by deemphasizing areas of inquiry most frequently pursued (...)
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  2.  73
    Investigating Trust, Expertise, and Epistemic Injustice in Chronic Pain.Daniel S. Goldberg, Anita Ho & Daniel Z. Buchman - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (1):31-42.
    Trust is central to the therapeutic relationship, but the epistemic asymmetries between the expert healthcare provider and the patient make the patient, the trustor, vulnerable to the provider, the trustee. The narratives of pain sufferers provide helpful insights into the experience of pain at the juncture of trust, expert knowledge, and the therapeutic relationship. While stories of pain sufferers having their testimonies dismissed are well documented, pain sufferers continue to experience their testimonies as being epistemically downgraded. This kind of epistemic (...)
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  3.  75
    Investigating Trust, Expertise, and Epistemic Injustice in Chronic Pain.Daniel Z. Buchman, Anita Ho & Daniel S. Goldberg - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (1):31-42.
    Trust is central to the therapeutic relationship, but the epistemic asymmetries between the expert healthcare provider and the patient make the patient, the trustor, vulnerable to the provider, the trustee. The narratives of pain sufferers provide helpful insights into the experience of pain at the juncture of trust, expert knowledge, and the therapeutic relationship. While stories of pain sufferers having their testimonies dismissed are well documented, pain sufferers continue to experience their testimonies as being epistemically downgraded. This kind of epistemic (...)
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  4.  21
    Duties When an Anonymous Student Health Survey Finds a Hot Spot of Suicidality.Arnold H. Levinson, M. Franci Crepeau-Hobson, Marilyn E. Coors, Jacqueline J. Glover, Daniel S. Goldberg & Matthew K. Wynia - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (10):50-60.
    Public health agencies regularly survey randomly selected anonymous students to track drug use, sexual activities, and other risk behaviors. Students are unidentifiable, but a recent project that i...
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  5.  27
    On Stigma & Health.Daniel S. Goldberg - 2017 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 45 (4):475-483.
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  6.  32
    The Shadows of Sunlight: Why Disclosure Should Not Be a Priority in Addressing Conflicts of Interest.Daniel S. Goldberg - 2019 - Public Health Ethics 12 (2):202-212.
    This article argues that positioning disclosure as a primary remedy in addressing the ethical problems posed by conflicts of interest in medicine and health is an error. Instead, bioethical resources should be devoted to the problems associated with sequestration, defined as the elimination of relationships between commercial industries and health professionals in all cases where it is remotely feasible. The argument begins by arguing that adopting Andrew Stark’s conceptual framework for COIs leads to advantages in understanding COIs and in ordering (...)
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  7.  50
    Job and the Stigmatization of Chronic Pain.Daniel S. Goldberg - 2010 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 53 (3):425-438.
    The point of departure for this essay is the question of why pain is seriously undertreated in the United States. Some kinds of pain (for example, chronic nonmalignant pain) are treated worse than others (acute pain secondary to cancer), but there is excellent evidence that no matter what kind of pain, astonishingly large percentages of pain sufferers are undertreated (Furrow 2001; Hill 1995; Kirou-Mauro et al. 2009; Martino 1998; Morris 1991; NCHS 2006; Resnik, Rehm, and Minard 2001). Although some kinds (...)
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  8.  42
    Obesity Stigma: A Failed and Ethically Dubious Strategy.Daniel S. Goldberg & Rebecca M. Puhl - 2013 - Hastings Center Report 43 (3):5-6.
    One of six commentaries on “Obesity: Chasing an Elusive Epidemic,” by Daniel Callahan, from the January‐February 2013 issue.
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  9.  23
    Harm Reduction Ethics, Public Health, and the Manufacture of Doubt.Daniel S. Goldberg - 2022 - American Journal of Bioethics 22 (10):18-20.
    Svirsky, Howard, and Berman’s paper “E-Cigarettes and the Multiple Responsibilities of the FDA” offers a significant contribution to a knowledge domain that might be called “harm reduction e...
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  10.  19
    Financial Conflicts of Interest are of Higher Ethical Priority than “Intellectual” Conflicts of Interest.Daniel S. Goldberg - 2020 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 17 (2):217-227.
    The primary claim of this paper is that intellectual conflicts of interest (COIs) exist but are of lower ethical priority than COIs flowing from relationships between health professionals and commercial industry characterized by financial exchange. The paper begins by defining intellectual COIs and framing them in the context of scholarship on non-financial COIs. However, the paper explains that the crucial distinction is not between financial and non-financial COIs but is rather between motivations for bias that flow from relationships and those (...)
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  11.  16
    Toward Fair and Humane Pain Policy.Daniel S. Goldberg - 2020 - Hastings Center Report 50 (4):33-36.
    Pain policy is not drug policy. If society wants to improve the lives of people in pain and compress the terrible inequalities in its diagnosis and treatment, we have to tailor policy to the root causes driving our problems in treating pain humanely and equitably. In the United States, we do not. Instead, we have proceeded to conflate drug policy with pain policy, relying on arguably magical thinking for the conclusion that by addressing the drug overdose crisis, we are simultaneously (...)
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  12.  19
    Comments Confirm That Student Health Surveillance Needs Ethics Guidelines to Act on Risk-Cluster Findings.Arnold H. Levinson, M. Franci Crepeau-Hobson, Jacqueline Glover, Marilyn E. Coors, Daniel S. Goldberg & Matthew K. Wynia - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (10):W4-W7.
    Volume 20, Issue 10, October 2020, Page W4-W7.
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  13. In support of a broad model of public health: Disparities, social epidemiology and public health causation.Daniel S. Goldberg - 2009 - Public Health Ethics 2 (1):70-83.
    Corresponding Author, Health Policy & Ethics Fellow, Chronic Disease Prevention & Control Research Center, Department of Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, 1709 Dryden, Suite 1025, Houston, TX 77030, USA. Tel.: 713.798.5482; Fax: 713 798 3990; Email: danielg{at}bcm.edu ' + u + '@' + d + ' '//--> . Abstract This article defends a broad model of public health, one that specifically addresses the social epidemiologic research suggesting that social conditions are primary determinants of health. The article proceeds by critiquing one (...)
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  14.  10
    The Bioethics of Pain Management: Beyond Opioids.Daniel S. Goldberg (ed.) - 2014 - New York: Routledge.
    In this book, public health ethicist Daniel S. Goldberg sets out to characterize the subjective experience of pain and its undertreatment within the US medical establishment, and puts forward public policy recommendations for ameliorating the undertreatment of pain. The book begins from the position that the overwhelming focus on opioid analgesics as a means for improving the undertreatment of pain is flawed, and argues instead that dominant Western models of biomedicine and objectivity delegitimize subjective knowledge of the body and pain (...)
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  15.  32
    On Physician–Industry Relationships and Unreasonable Standards of Proof for Harm: A Population-Level Bioethics Approach.Daniel Goldberg - 2016 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 26 (2):173-194.
    In the first of a trilogy of articles published in the New England Journal of Medicine in May 2015, physician–journalist Lisa Rosenbaum observes that the crucial question regarding conflicts of interest between physicians and commercial industry is the extent to which interactions between the two are “beneficial or harmful to patients?”. She goes on to note that the answer to this question “depends on how you define harm,”1 and argues that many of the claims of harm flowing from COI are (...)
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  16.  51
    The Naturalistic Fallacy in Ethical Discourse on the Social Determinants of Health.Daniel Goldberg - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics 15 (3):58-60.
  17.  17
    A Legal and Ethical Analysis of the Effects of Triggering Conditions on Surrogate Decision-Making in End-of-Life Care in the US.Daniel S. Goldberg & J. Clint Parker - 2016 - HEC Forum 28 (1):11-33.
    The central claim of this paper is that American states’ use of so-called “triggering conditions” to regulate surrogate decision-making authority in end-of-life care leaves unresolved a number of important ethical and legal considerations regarding the scope of that authority. The paper frames the issue with a case set in a jurisdiction in which surrogate authority to withdraw life-sustaining treatment is triggered by two specific clinical conditions. The case presents a quandary insofar as the clinical facts do not satisfy the triggering (...)
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  18.  14
    Structural Stigma, Legal Epidemiology, and COVID-19: The Ethical Imperative to Act Upstream.Daniel S. Goldberg - 2020 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 30 (3):339-359.
    The primary claim of this paper is that COVID-19 stigma must be understood as a structural phenomenon. Doing so will inform the interventions we select and prioritize for the amelioration of such stigma. Thinking about stigma as a macrosocial determinant of health driven by structural factors suggests that downstream remedies are unlikely to be effective in significantly reducing stigma. This paper develops and defends this claim, setting up a recommendation to use a “bundle” of legal and policy levers at meso- (...)
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  19.  42
    “What They Think of the Causes of So Much Suffering”: S. Weir Mitchell, John Kearsley Mitchell, and Ideas about Phantom Limb Pain in Late 19th c. America.Daniel Goldberg - 2016 - Spontaneous Generations 8 (1):27-54.
    This paper analyzes S. Weir Mitchell and his son John Kearsley Mitchell’s views on phantom limb pain in late 19th c. America. Drawing on a variety of primary sources including journal articles, letters, and treatises, the paper pioneers analysis of a cache of surveys sent out by the Mitchells that contain amputee Civil War veterans’ own narratives of phantom limb pain. The paper utilizes an approach drawn from the history of ideas, documenting how changing models of medicine and objectivity help (...)
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  20.  38
    A Legal and Ethical Analysis of the Effects of Triggering Conditions on Surrogate Decision-Making in End-of-Life Care in the US.J. Clint Parker & Daniel S. Goldberg - 2016 - HEC Forum 28 (1):11-33.
    The central claim of this paper is that American states’ use of so-called “triggering conditions” to regulate surrogate decision-making authority in end-of-life care leaves unresolved a number of important ethical and legal considerations regarding the scope of that authority. The paper frames the issue with a case set in a jurisdiction in which surrogate authority to withdraw life-sustaining treatment is triggered by two specific clinical conditions. The case presents a quandary insofar as the clinical facts do not satisfy the triggering (...)
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  21.  64
    Youth Sports & Public Health: Framing Risks of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury in American Football and Ice Hockey.Kathleen E. Bachynski & Daniel S. Goldberg - 2014 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 42 (3):323-333.
    The framing of the risks of experiencing mild traumatic brain injury in American football and ice hockey has an enormous impact in defining the scope of the problem and the remedies that are prioritized. According to the prevailing risk frame, an acceptable level of safety can be maintained in these contact sports through the application of technology, rule changes, and laws. An alternative frame acknowledging that these sports carry significant risks would produce very different ethical, political, and social debates.
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  22.  30
    Youth Sports & Public Health: Framing Risks of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury in American Football and Ice Hockey.Kathleen E. Bachynski & Daniel S. Goldberg - 2014 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 42 (3):323-333.
    Children in North America, some as young as eleven or twelve, routinely don helmets and pads and are trained to move at high-speed for the purpose of engaging in repeated full-body collisions with each other. The evidence suggests that the forces generated by such impacts are sufficient to cause traumatic brain injury among children. Moreover, there is only limited evidence supporting the efficacy of interventions typically used to reduce the risks of such hazards. What kind of risk assessment enables such (...)
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  23.  23
    Introduction: Living with Pain in the Midst of the Opioid Crisis.Kelly K. Dineen & Daniel S. Goldberg - 2018 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 8 (3):189-193.
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  24.  15
    Justice, Population Health, and Deep Brain Stimulation: The Interplay of Inequities and Novel Health Technologies.Daniel S. Goldberg - 2012 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 3 (1):16-20.
    This article adopts a population-level bioethics approach to analyzing the ethical implications of novel deep-brain stimulation (DBS) technologies. I claim that a microlevel focus on costs and benefits is necessary but insufficient to address the concerns of social justice and health equity that attend the potential utilization of DBS technologies. A macrosocial, population-based analysis notes two ethically significant trends regarding novel health technologies: (1) that they are the prime mover of hyperinflationary health cost trajectories, and (2) that even where they (...)
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  25.  30
    On the Erroneous Conflation of Opiophobia and the Undertreatment of Pain.Daniel S. Goldberg - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (11):20-22.
  26.  80
    Doubt & Social Policy: The Long History of Malingering in Modern Welfare States.Daniel S. Goldberg - 2021 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 49 (3):385-393.
    This essay explores the long Western history of anxieties about feigned illness connected specifically to social policy. There is a remarkable consistency of such anxieties across time, as they appear in almost every major historical period in the West since the Middle Ages.
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  27.  23
    Subjectivity, Consciousness, and Pain: The Importance of Thinking Phenomenologically.Daniel Goldberg - 2009 - American Journal of Bioethics 9 (9):14-16.
  28.  28
    Pragmatism and virtue ethics in clinical research.Daniel Goldberg - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (4):43 – 45.
  29.  9
    The detection of constructed memories and the risks of undue prejudice.Daniel Goldberg - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (1):23 – 25.
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  30.  32
    Fatness, Medicalization, and Stigma: On the Need to Do Better.Daniel S. Goldberg - 2014 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 4 (2):117-123.
    This article comments on a collection of remarkable narratives authored by fat writers addressing the American Medical Association’s decision to label obesity a disease. Endeavoring to avoid what has been termed “thinsplaining,” the commentary examines the voices of the writers in the hopes of identifying key themes and points that emerge from these fat narratives. The commentary canvasses the writers’ perspectives on topics such as the medicalization and pathologization of fat, the Western and especially American tendency to emphasize individual culpability (...)
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  31.  2
    Integrating Public Health Ethics into Public Health Policymaking: Being in the Room Where It Happens.Jalayne J. Arias & Daniel S. Goldberg - 2024 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 52 (1):183-187.
    This commentary takes up a challenge posed by Franklin Miller in a 2022 essay in Bioethics Forum. Dr. Miller queried whether bioethicists could be useful in public health policy contexts and while he refrained from issuing an ultimate opinion, did identify several challenges to such utility. The current piece responds to the challenges Dr. Miller identifies and argues that with appropriate training, public health ethicists can be of service in virtually any context in which public health policies are deliberated and (...)
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  32.  26
    Shifting Values, Student Educational Preferences, and Ethics in the Business Curriculum.Robert A. Giacalone, Mark D. Promislo, Daniel E. Goldberg & Elizabeth A. Giacalone - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics Education 11:41-68.
    In the past 40 years, a global shift has taken place towards a constellation of values known as “expansive values”, which de-emphasize pursuits of money, possessions, and status, and instead focus on quality of life and humanistic goals. This study investigated what students holding expansive values desired in business school course content and student quality of life, and how these preferences differed from students holding materialistic values. Results revealed a number of different factors that were associated only with expansive values, (...)
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  33.  6
    Against the Medicalization of Public Health.Daniel S. Goldberg - 2021 - Public Health Ethics 14 (2):117-119.
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  34.  39
    Justice, health literacy and social epidemiology.Daniel S. Goldberg - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (11):18 – 20.
    Commentary on Angelo E. Volandes & Michael K. Paasche-Orlow, Health Literacy, Health Inequality and a Just Healthcare System.
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  35.  31
    Spirituality: Respect but don't reveal.Daniel S. Goldberg & Howard Brody - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (7):21 – 22.
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  36.  13
    The enigmatic oxygen‐avid hemoglobin of Ascaris.Daniel E. Goldberg - 1995 - Bioessays 17 (2):177-182.
    The parasitic nematode Ascaris lives in the low‐oxygen intestinal folds of over one billion people world‐wwide. The worm has an octameric hemoglobin that binds oxygen four orders of magnitude more tightly than does human hemogobin. Our studies have focused on elucidating the molecular mechanism of oxygen avidity, the basis of multimerization and the function of this remarkable molecule. We now believe that we understand a fair amount about the molecular interactions that result in enhanced avidity, have some preliminary ideas on (...)
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  37.  17
    Allies, not authorities: Historical and bioethical considerations for a post‐ Roe world.Lauren MacIvor Thompson, Daniel S. Goldberg & Kelly O'Donnell - 2022 - Bioethics 36 (8):819-820.
    Bioethics, Volume 36, Issue 8, Page 819-820, October 2022.
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  38. Concussions, Professional Sports, and Conflicts of Interest: Why the National Football League’s Current Policies are Bad for Its Health. [REVIEW]Daniel S. Goldberg - 2008 - HEC Forum 20 (4):337-355.
  39.  35
    The Transformative Power of X-Rays in U.S. Scientific & Medical Litigation: Mechanical Objectivity in Smith v. Grant (1896). [REVIEW]Daniel S. Goldberg - 2013 - Perspectives on Science 21 (1):23-57.
    On or about June 5, 1895, in Denver, Colorado, a 23-year-old law clerk named James Smith fell off a ladder and injured his left thigh near the hip. Three days later, on June 8, 1895, Smith consulted a physician named George Gibson. Gibson saw Smith twice.1 After several weeks of continued pain, on June 24, 1895 Grant consulted a different physician named W. W. Grant. Grant was already a well-known railway surgeon in the local medical community, and would go on (...)
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  40.  32
    Book Review: Karla FC Holloway, Private Bodies, Public Texts: Durham: Duke University Press, 2011. [REVIEW]Daniel S. Goldberg - 2012 - Journal of Medical Humanities 33 (2):137-139.
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  41.  37
    Exilic Effects of Illness and Pain in Solzhenitsyn’s Cancer Ward: How Sharpening the Moral Imagination Can Facilitate Repatriation. [REVIEW]Daniel S. Goldberg - 2009 - Journal of Medical Humanities 30 (1):29-42.
    This essay uses Solzhenitsyn’s Cancer Ward to explore the exilic effects of illness and pain. The novel is uniquely suited for such an analysis given the theme of exile that predominates both in the narrative and in the composition of multiple characters within that narrative. I argue that illness, and in particular pain, is a liminal state, an existential hinterlands. The ethical approach to literature and medicine may suggest, as a response to these exilic effects, the need to cultivate connection (...)
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  42.  17
    Review of Adam Kolber, Neuroethics & Law Blog. [REVIEW]Daniel S. Goldberg - 2009 - American Journal of Bioethics 9 (5):53-54.
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