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Daniel Cohen
Colby College
Daniel B Cohen
Charles Sturt University
  1. Decision theory for agents with incomplete preferences.Adam Bales, Daniel Cohen & Toby Handfield - 2014 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 92 (3):453-70.
    Orthodox decision theory gives no advice to agents who hold two goods to be incommensurate in value because such agents will have incomplete preferences. According to standard treatments, rationality requires complete preferences, so such agents are irrational. Experience shows, however, that incomplete preferences are ubiquitous in ordinary life. In this paper, we aim to do two things: (1) show that there is a good case for revising decision theory so as to allow it to apply non-vacuously to agents with incomplete (...)
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  2. Argument is War... And War is Hell: Philosophy, Education, and Metaphors for Argumentation.Daniel H. Cohen - 1995 - Informal Logic 17 (2):177-188.
    The claim that argumentation has no proper role in either philosophy or education, and especially not in philosophical education, flies in the face of both conventional wisdom and traditional pedagogy. There is, however, something to be said for it because it is really only provocative against a certain philosophical backdrop. Our understanding of the concept "argument" is both reflected by and molded by the specific metaphor that argument-is-war, something with winners and losers, offensive and defensive moments, and an essentially adversarial (...)
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  3.  55
    Angelic Devil’s Advocates and the Forms of Adversariality.Katharina Stevens & Daniel H. Cohen - 2020 - Topoi 40 (5):899-912.
    Is argumentation essentially adversarial? The concept of a devil's advocate—a cooperative arguer who assumes the role of an opponent for the sake of the argument—serves as a lens to bring into clearer focus the ways that adversarial arguers can be virtuous and adversariality itself can contribute to argumentation's goals. It also shows the different ways arguments can be adversarial and the different ways that argumentation can be said to be "essentially" adversarial.
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  4.  42
    The attraction of the ideal has no traction on the real: on adversariality and roles in argument.Katharina Stevens & Daniel Cohen - 2018 - Argumentation and Advocacy:forthcoming.
    If circumstances were always simple and all arguers were always exclusively concerned with cognitive improvement, arguments would probably always be cooperative. However, we have other goals and there are other arguers, so in practice the default seems to be adversarial argumentation. We naturally inhabit the heuristically helpful but cooperation-inhibiting roles of proponents and opponents. We can, however, opt for more cooperative roles. The resources of virtue argumentation theory are used to explain when proactive cooperation is permissible, advisable, and even mandatory (...)
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  5.  63
    Arguments that Backfire.Daniel H. Cohen - 2005 - In D. Hitchcock & D. Farr (eds.), The Uses of Argument. OSSA. pp. 58-65.
    One result of successful argumentation – able arguers presenting cogent arguments to competent audiences – is a transfer of credibility from premises to conclusions. From a purely logical perspective, neither dubious premises nor fallacious inference should lower the credibility of the target conclusion. Nevertheless, some arguments do backfire this way. Dialectical and rhetorical considerations come into play. Three inter-related conclusions emerge from a catalogue of hapless arguers and backfiring arguments. First, there are advantages to paying attention to arguers and their (...)
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  6.  52
    Virtue, In Context.Daniel H. Cohen - 2013 - Informal Logic 33 (4):471-485.
    Virtue argumentation theory provides the best framework for accommodating the notion of an argument that is “fully satisfying” in a robust and integrated sense. The process of explicating the notion of fully satisfying arguments requires expanding the concept of arguers to include all of an argument’s participants, including judges, juries, and interested spectators. And that, in turn, requires expanding the concept of an argument itself to include its entire context.
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  7. Finking Frankfurt.Daniel Cohen & Toby Handfield - 2007 - Philosophical Studies 135 (3):363--74.
    Michael Smith has resisted Harry Frankfurt's claim that moral responsibility does not require the ability to have done otherwise. He does this by claiming that, in Frankfurt cases, the ability to do otherwise is indeed present, but is a disposition that has been `finked' or masked by other factors. We suggest that, while Smith's account appears to work for some classic Frankfurt cases, it does not work for all. In particular, Smith cannot explain cases, such as the Willing Addict, where (...)
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  8.  59
    An Actualist Explanation of the Procreation Asymmetry.Daniel Cohen - 2020 - Utilitas 32 (1):70-89.
    While morality prohibits us from creating miserable children, it does not require us to create happy children. I offer an actualist explanation of this apparent asymmetry. Assume that for every possible world W, there is a distinct set of permissibility facts determined by the welfare of those who exist in W. Moral actualism says that actual-world permissibility facts should determine one's choice between worlds. But if one doesn't know which world is actual, one must aim for subjective rightness and maximize (...)
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  9.  37
    Arguments and Metaphors in Philosophy.Daniel Harry Cohen - 2004 - University Press of America.
    In this book, Daniel Cohen explores the connections between arguments and metaphors, most pronounced in philosophy because philosophical discourse is both thoroughly metaphorical and replete with argumentation. Cohen covers the nature of arguments, their modes and structures, and the principles of their evaluation, and addresses the nature of metaphors, their place in language and thought, and their connections to arguments, identifying and reconciling arguments' and metaphors' respective roles in philosophy.
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  10. Introduction: Virtues and Arguments.Andrew Aberdein & Daniel H. Cohen - 2016 - Topoi 35 (2):339-343.
    It has been a decade since the phrase virtue argumentation was introduced, and while it would be an exaggeration to say that it burst onto the scene, it would be just as much of an understatement to say that it has gone unnoticed. Trying to strike the virtuous mean between the extremes of hyperbole and litotes, then, we can fairly characterize it as a way of thinking about arguments and argumentation that has steadily attracted more and more attention from argumentation (...)
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  11. Rational Capacities, Resolve, and Weakness of Will.Daniel Cohen & Toby Handfield - 2010 - Mind 119 (476):907 - 932.
    In this paper we present an account of practical rationality and weakness of will in terms of rational capacities. We show how our account rectifies various shortcomings in Michael Smith's related theory. In particular, our account is capable of accommodating cases of weak-willed behaviour that are not `akratic', or otherwise contrary to the agent's better judgement. Our account differs from Smith's primarily by incorporating resolve: a third rational capacity for resolute maintenance of one's intentions. We discuss further two ways to (...)
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  12.  60
    What Virtue Argumentation Theory Misses: The Case of Compathetic Argumentation.Daniel H. Cohen & George Miller - 2016 - Topoi 35 (2):451-460.
    While deductive validity provides the limiting upper bound for evaluating the strength and quality of inferences, by itself it is an inadequate tool for evaluating arguments, arguing, and argumentation. Similar remarks can be made about rhetorical success and dialectical closure. Then what would count as ideal argumentation? In this paper we introduce the concept of cognitive compathy to point in the direction of one way to answer that question. It is a feature of our argumentation rather than my argument or (...)
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  13. The Virtuous Troll: Argumentative Virtues in the Age of (Technologically Enhanced) Argumentative Pluralism.Daniel H. Cohen - 2017 - Philosophy and Technology 30 (2):179-189.
    Technology has made argumentation rampant. We can argue whenever we want. With social media venues for every interest, we can also argue about whatever we want. To some extent, we can select our opponents and audiences to argue with whomever we want. And we can argue however we want, whether in carefully reasoned, article-length expositions, real-time exchanges, or 140-character polemics. The concepts of arguing, arguing well, and even being an arguer have evolved with this new multiplicity and diversity; theory needs (...)
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  14.  48
    Virtue Epistemology and Argumentation Theory.Daniel H. Cohen - 2007 - In David Hitchcock (ed.), Dissensus and the search for common ground. OSSA.
    Virtue epistemology was modeled on virtue ethics theories to transfer their ethical insights to epistemology. VE has had great success: broadening our perspective, providing new answers to traditional questions, and raising exciting new questions. I offer a new argument for VE based on the concept of cognitive achievements, a broader notion than purely epistemic achievements. The argument is then extended to cognitive transformations, especially the cognitive transformations brought about by argumentation.
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  15.  52
    The problem of counterpossibles.Daniel H. Cohen - 1987 - Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 29 (1):91-101.
  16.  68
    Evaluating arguments and making meta-arguments.Daniel H. Cohen - 2001 - Informal Logic 21 (2).
    This paper explores the outlines of a framework for evaluating arguments. Among the factors to take into account are the strength of the arguers' inferences, the level of their engagement with objections raised by other interlocutors, and their effectiveness in rationally persuading their target audiences. Some connections among these can be understood only in the context of meta-argumentation and meta-rationality. The Principle of Meta-Rationality (PMR)--that reasoning rationally includes reasoning about rationality-is used to explain why it can be rational to resist (...)
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  17.  36
    Are there methods of informal logic?Hans V. Hansen & Daniel H. Cohen - unknown
    This presentation seeks to understand informal logic as a set of methods for the logical evaluation of natural language arguments. Some of the methods identified are the fallacies method, deductivism, warrantism and argument schemes. A framework for comparing the adequacy of the methods is outlined consisting of the following categories: learner- and user-efficiency, subjective and objective reliability, and scope. Within this framework, it is also possible to compare informal and formal logic.
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  18.  50
    Argumentative Virtues as Conduits for Reason’s Causal Efficacy: Why the Practice of Giving Reasons Requires that We Practice Hearing Reasons.Daniel H. Cohen - 2019 - Topoi 38 (4):711-718.
    Psychological and neuroscientific data suggest that a great deal, perhaps even most, of our reasoning turns out to be rationalizing. The reasons we give for our positions are seldom either the real reasons or the effective causes of why we have those positions. We are not as rational as we like to think. A second, no less disheartening observation is that while we may be very effective when it comes to giving reasons, we are not that good at getting reasons. (...)
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  19.  17
    Argumentative Virtues as Conduits for Reason’s Causal Efficacy: Why the Practice of Giving Reasons Requires that We Practice Hearing Reasons.Daniel H. Cohen - 2019 - Topoi 38 (4):711-718.
    Psychological and neuroscientific data suggest that a great deal, perhaps even most, of our reasoning turns out to be rationalizing. The reasons we give for our positions are seldom either the real reasons or the effective causes of why we have those positions. We are not as rational as we like to think. A second, no less disheartening observation is that while we may be very effective when it comes to giving reasons, we are not that good at getting reasons. (...)
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  20.  21
    Argumentative Virtues as Conduits for Reason’s Causal Efficacy: Why the Practice of Giving Reasons Requires that We Practice Hearing Reasons.Daniel H. Cohen - 2019 - Topoi 38 (4):711-718.
    Psychological and neuroscientific data suggest that a great deal, perhaps even most, of our reasoning turns out to be rationalizing. The reasons we give for our positions are seldom either the real reasons or the effective causes of why we have those positions. We are not as rational as we like to think. A second, no less disheartening observation is that while we may be very effective when it comes to giving reasons, we are not that good at getting reasons. (...)
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  21.  30
    Essays on free will and moral responsibility.Nick Trakakis & Daniel Cohen (eds.) - 2008 - Newcastle: Cambridge Scholars Press.
    The problem of free will has fascinated philosophers since ancient times: Do we have free will, or at least the kind of free will that seems necessary for moral responsibility? Does determinism - the idea that everything that happens is necessitated to happen, given the past and the laws of nature - threaten the commonly held assumption that we are indeed free and morally responsible? Although these questions have been widely discussed in the past, the present volume offers a variety (...)
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  22.  11
    Evolution of the Parietal Lobe in the Formation of an Enhanced “Sense of Self”.Daniel Cohen & Brick Johnstone - 2024 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 24 (1-2):91-120.
    Recent neuropaleontological research suggests that the parietal lobe has increased in size as much as the frontal lobes in Homo Sapiens over the past 150,000 years, but has not provided a neuropsychological explanation for the evolution of human socialization or the development of religion. Drawing from several areas of research, (i.e., neurodevelopment, neuropsychology, paleoneurology, cognitive science, archeology, and anthropology), we argue that parietal evolution in Homo sapiens integrated sensations and mental processes into a more integrated subjective “sense of self”. This (...)
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  23.  24
    On What Cannot Be.Daniel Cohen - 1990 - In J. Dunn & A. Gupta (eds.), Truth or Consequences: Essays in Honor of Nuel Belnap. Boston, MA, USA: Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 123--132.
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  24.  70
    A Reply to Cahn.Daniel H. Cohen - 1988 - Analysis 48 (2):109 - 110.
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  25.  19
    Sincerity, Santa Claus Arguments and Dissensus in Coalitions.Daniel H. Cohen - 2009 - In Juho Ritola (ed.), Argument Cultures: Proceedings of the 9yj Internaional Conferrence of the Ontario Society for the Study of Argumentation. OSSA. pp. 1-8.
    It is a virtue of virtue theory approaches to argumentation that they integrate many of the different factors that make arguments good arguments. The insights of virtue argumentation are brought to bear on a variety of versions of the requirement that good arguments must have good premises, concluding that a sincerity condition serves better than truth or assertability conditions, despite apparently counterintuitive consequences for arguments involving heterogeneous coalitions.
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  26.  36
    Responsibility from the Margins, by David Shoemaker: New York: Oxford University Press, 2015, pp. xv + 262, US$50.Daniel Cohen - 2016 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 94 (4):840-841.
  27.  1
    Le monde est clos et le désir infini.Daniel Cohen - 2015 - Paris: Albin Michel.
    Pt. 1. Aux sources de la croissance -- L'espèce humaine -- L'exode -- Le 13 novembre 2026 -- Naissance de la monnaie -- Le vol de l'histoire -- Du monde clos à l'univers infini -- Pt. 2. L'avenir, l'avenir ! -- La singularité est proche -- Où va le travail humain 2 -- La croissance disparue -- Marx à Hollywood -- De collapsus novum -- Pt. 3. Repenser le progrès -- La (nouvelle) grande transformation -- L'autonomie et la survie -- (...)
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  28.  32
    Commentary on: Katharina von Radziewsky's "The virtuous arguer: One person, four characters".Daniel H. Cohen - 2014 - In Dima Mohammed & Marcin Lewinski (eds.), Virtues of argumentation: Proceedings of the 10th International Conference of the Ontario Society for the Study of Argumentation (OSSA), May 22–25, 2013. OSSA.
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  29.  29
    Just and Unjust Wars - and Just and Unjust Arguments.Daniel H. Cohen - 2003 - In IL@25: Proceedings of the 2003 Meetings of the Ontario Society for the Study of Argumentation.
    For all its problems, there is still much to be gleaned from the argument-is-war paradigm. Much of the conceptual vocabulary that we use to talk about wars is commonly applied to arguments. Other concepts in the war-cluster can also be readily adapted to arguments. Some parts, of course, do not seem to apply so easily, if at all. Of most interest here are those war-concepts that have not been deployed in thinking about arguments but really should be because of the (...)
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  30.  50
    A new axiomatization of Belnap's conditional assertion.Daniel H. Cohen - 1986 - Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 27 (1):124-132.
  31.  12
    You Cannot Judge an Argument by its Closure.Daniel H. Cohen - 2022 - Informal Logic 43 (4):669-684.
    he best arguments are distinguished by more than logical validity, successful rhetorical persuasion, or satisfactory dialectical closure. Argument appraisal has to look beyond the premises, inferences, and conclusions; it must consider more than just the objections and replies, and resolutions that satisfy the arguers might not satisfy outside critics. Arguers and their contexts can be important factors for assessing arguments. This conclusion is reached by considering several scenarios in which similar arguments—up to and including complete word-for-word identity—merit different critical responses.
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  32.  78
    Why a victim's age is irrelevant when assessing the wrongness of killing.Daniel Cohen & Morgan Luck - 2009 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 26 (4):396-401.
    abstract Intuitively, all killings are equally wrong, no matter how old one's victim. In this paper we defend this claim — The Equal Wrongness of Killings Thesis — against a challenge presented by Kasper Lippert-Rasmussen. Lippert-Rasmussen shows The Equal Wrongness of Killings Thesis to be incompatible with two further theses: The Unequal Wrongness of Renderings Unconscious Thesis and The Equivalence Thesis. Lippert-Rasmussen argues that, of the three, The Equal Wrongness of Killings Thesis is the least defensible. He suggests that the (...)
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  33.  11
    You Cannot Judge an Argument by its Closure.Daniel H. Cohen - 2022 - Informal Logic 43 (4):669-684.
    he best arguments are distinguished by more than logical validity, successful rhetorical persuasion, or satisfactory dialectical closure. Argument appraisal has to look beyond the premises, inferences, and conclusions; it must consider more than just the objections and replies, and resolutions that satisfy the arguers might not satisfy outside critics. Arguers and their contexts can be important factors for assessing arguments. This conclusion is reached by considering several scenarios in which similar arguments—up to and including complete word-for-word identity—merit different critical responses.
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  34.  6
    Assertion and Conditionals.Daniel Cohen - 1987 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 52 (4):1051-1052.
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  35.  6
    A filosofia do mito em Plotino e Proclo: um estudo comparativo.Daniel Cohen & Joachim Lacrosse - 2010 - Archai: Revista de Estudos Sobre as Origens Do Pensamento Ocidental 5:77-82.
    This contribution resumes the main conclusions of a common work of philosophical comparatism between the Neoplatonism of Plotinus and Proclus, which is based on the examination of their respective reception of the traditional metaphysical use of anciant myths. This article consists in the examination of two important “definitions” of myth collected in the Enneads of Plotinus and Proclus’ Commentary on the Republic. On the basis of these analyses, it is possible to assert that, for Plotinus as for Proclus, the muthos (...)
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  36.  5
    A filosofia do mito em Plotino e Proclo: um estudo comparativo.Daniel Cohen & Joachim Lacrosse - 2010 - Archai: Revista de Estudos Sobre as Origens Do Pensamento Ocidental 5:77-82.
    This contribution resumes the main conclusions of a common work of philosophical comparatism between the Neoplatonism of Plotinus and Proclus, which is based on the examination of their respective reception of the traditional metaphysical use of anciant myths. This article consists in the examination of two important “definitions” of myth collected in the Enneads of Plotinus and Proclus’ Commentary on the Republic. On the basis of these analyses, it is possible to assert that, for Plotinus as for Proclus, the muthos (...)
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  37.  20
    A Reply to Steven M Cahn on Divestiture.Daniel H. Cohen - 1988 - Analysis 48 (2):109-110.
    Steven m cahn, In the june 1987 issue of "analysis", Asks how a principled divesture of stocks is possible. Selling stock requires a buyer, So no net reduction of objectionable economic behavior results. Is divestiture merely self-Righteous cleansing of one's own hands? not necessarily. It is argued that divesture as a means to influence corporate behavior, And not just as a means to a clean portfolio, Can be justified.
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  38.  37
    Arguing With God.Daniel H. Cohen - 2001
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  39.  5
    Computability and logic.Daniel E. Cohen - 1987 - New York: Halsted Press.
  40.  20
    Commentary on Finocchiaro.Daniel H. Cohen - unknown
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  41.  14
    Commentary on Kagan.Daniel H. Cohen - unknown
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  42.  21
    Commentary on MIchael Yong-Set's ludological approach to argumentation.Daniel H. Cohen - unknown
    Although Michael Yong-Set's proposal to approach argumentation theory from a ludological perspective is not yet sufficiently developed to warrant adopting it, there is enough to warrant exploring it further – which is all the reception it needs at this point.
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  43.  13
    Commentary on Rose.Daniel H. Cohen - unknown
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  44.  43
    Conditionals, quantification, and strong mathematical induction.Daniel H. Cohen - 1991 - Journal of Philosophical Logic 20 (3):315 - 326.
  45.  24
    Degree problems for modular machines.Daniel E. Cohen - 1980 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 45 (3):510-528.
  46.  22
    Fogelin's Walking the Tightrope of Reason: The Precarious Life of a Rational Animal by Robert Fogelin.Daniel H. Cohen - 2003 - Informal Logic 23 (1).
  47.  57
    Informal Logic and the Surprise Exam.Daniel H. Cohen - 2002 - Informal Logic 22 (2).
  48. IL@25: Proceedings of the 2003 Meetings of the Ontario Society for the Study of Argumentation.Daniel H. Cohen - 2003
     
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  49.  4
    If, What-If, and So-What.Daniel H. Cohen - 1998 - The Paideia Archive: Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 17:20-28.
    With the possible exception of completely formal exercises in logic, philosophy is thoroughly metaphorical and largely conditional. Moreover, the purposes served by metaphors and conditionals in it are similar. Metaphors ask us to imagine the world in a new way, while conditionals may ask to imagine a new world. Yet some conditionals and metaphors are incompatible. There are limits to how metaphors can occur in conditionals, and how conditionals can themselves be metaphors. Specifically, only certain kinds of metaphors can be (...)
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  50.  7
    Le capitalisme est-il moral ?Daniel Cohen - 2011 - Revue Internationale de Philosophie 258 (4):33-36.
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