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  1.  88
    Reclaiming “Science as a Vocation”: Learning as Self-Destruction; Teaching as Self-Restraint.D. M. Yeager - 1998 - Tradition and Discovery 25 (2):30-41.
    Working from an integration of Michael Polanyi‘s image of learning as self-destruction and Max Weber’s analysis of the ethics of scholarship, the author explores the implications of Polanyi’s argument concerning “the depth to which the... person is involved even in... an elementary heuristic effort”. In the process, the author raises questions about current expectations concerning faculty “performance” and current methods of assessing faculty success in the classroom.
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  2.  84
    From Biology to Social Experience to Morality: Reflections on the Naturalization of Morality.D. M. Yeager - 2003 - Tradition and Discovery 30 (3):31-39.
    Placing Goodenough and Deacon’s “From Biology to Consciousness to Morality” against the background of the ethical naturalism of seventeenth- and eighteenth-century British moral theory, Yeager highlights the contribution the authors make to the moral sense tradition as well as indicating the limitations of such accounts of moral agency, judgment, and conduct. Yeager also identifies two strands of the essay that seem to open toward a more comprehensive account than the authors actually give. The first concerns the “interplay between self-interest and (...)
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  3.  71
    Confronting the Minotaur: Moral Inversion and Polanyi’s Moral Philosophy.D. M. Yeager - 2002 - Tradition and Discovery 29 (1):22-48.
    Moral inversion, the fusion of skepticism and utopianism, is a preoccupying theme in Polanyi’s work from 1946 onward. In part 1, the author analyzes Polanyi’s complex account of the intellectual developments that are implicated in a cascade of inversions in which the good is lost through complicated, misguided, and unrealistic dedication to the good. Parts 2 and 3 then address two of the most basic of the objections to Polanyi’s theory voiced by Zdzislaw Najder. To Najder’s complaint that Polanyi is (...)
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  4.  43
    Salto Mortale.D. M. Yeager - 2008 - Tradition and Discovery 35 (2):31-38.
    Ranging himself against philosophical and theological traditions that he considered “bankrupt,” William H. Poteat sought to set philosophy back on its feet by exemplifying the way one might reason philosophically from a different set of assumptions. His project can, in this respect, be usefully compared to that of F. H. Jacobi two centuries earlier. Poteat and Michael Polanyi offered attuned critiques of philosophical presuppositions and practices. Constructively, both were committed to bringing home the agent and knower who had been evacuated (...)
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  5.  8
    Heterosexism in Contemporary World Religion: Problem and Prospect; Out of the Shadows, Into the Light: Christianity and Homosexuality; Reasoning Together: A Conversation on Homosexuality.D. M. Yeager - 2011 - Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics 31 (2):190-194.
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  6.  16
    “Art for Humanity's Sake” the Social Novel as a Mode of Moral Discourse.D. M. Yeager - 2005 - Journal of Religious Ethics 33 (3):445-485.
    The social novel ought not to be confused with didacticism in literature and ought not to be expected to provide prescriptions for the cure of social ills. Neither should it necessarily be viewed as ephemeral. After examining justifications of the social novel offered by William Dean Howells (in the 1880s) and Jonathan Franzen (in the 1990s), the author explores the way in which social novels alter perceptions and responses at levels of sensibility that are not usually susceptible to rational argument, (...)
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  7.  7
    “Suspended in Wonderment”: Beauty, Religious Affections, and Ecological Ethics.D. M. Yeager - 2015 - Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics 35 (1):121-145.
    Three figures in the American Reformed tradition—the novelist Marilynne Robinson, the theocentric ethicist James Gustafson, and the biocentric poet Robinson Jeffers—treat the perception of beauty as the framework of moral discernment in ways that seem particularly significant for ecological ethics. Their work makes vividly concrete dimensions of Calvin's theology of creation that have been the subject of increasing theological attention over the past twenty-five years. By focusing on receptivity to natural beauty, their approach suggests a reorientation of the Christian ecological (...)
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  8.  35
    Polanyi's Finalism.John F. Haught & D. M. Yeager - 1997 - Zygon 32 (4):543-566.
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  9.  5
    Love and Mirth in The Horse's Mouth.D. M. Yeager - 1981 - Renascence 33 (3):131-142.
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  10.  2
    A Quality of Wonder.D. M. Yeager - 2019 - Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics 39 (2):213-235.
    What place has poetry in the teaching or reflection of ethicists? Even poetry that has no obvious political edge can play an important role in refining a poetics of the will, where will is understood at once as the motive power of action and as the seat of both our freedom and our bondage. Poems by W. H. Auden, Anthony Hecht, Galway Kinnell, William Carols Williams, and others are examined against a background provided by the work of Erazim Kohák, H. (...)
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  11.  1
    The View From Somewhere.D. M. Yeager - 2003 - Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics 23 (1):101-120.
    Accepting James Gustafson's recent argument that right reading and valid criticism of H. R. Niebuhr's Christ and Culture must begin with an informed understanding of Niebuhr's utilization of the ideal-typical method, the author reviews characteristics of Weberian typologies and discusses the levels of criticism to which typologies are legitimately subject. Right appreciation of the text's genre exposes many criticisms of Christ and Culture to be misguided, but it also throws into relief those features of the text that cannot be accounted (...)
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  12.  58
    Of Eagles and Crows, Lions and Oxen: Blake and the Disruption of Ethics: Focus on William Blake.D. M. Yeager - 2009 - Journal of Religious Ethics 37 (1):1-31.
    Why focus on the work of William Blake in a journal dedicated to religious ethics? The question is neither trivial nor rhetorical. Blake 's work is certainly not in anyone's canon of significant texts for the study of Christian or, more broadly, religious ethics. Yet Blake, however subversive his views, sought to lay out a Christian vision of the good, alternated between prophetic denunciations of the world's folly and harrowing laments over the wreck of the world's promise, and wrote poetry (...)
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