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  1.  24
    A History of Christian Missions. [REVIEW]J. B. D. - 1966 - Review of Metaphysics 19 (3):595-595.
    Neil offers a comprehensive but highly readable account of the world expansion and missionary efforts of Christianity—in its Catholic, Protestant, and Orthodox varieties. What emerges rather clearly is the close connection between post-Renaissance European political expansion and Christian missionary activities: the former appears to have been the condition of the latter with a rather detrimental tendency to over-identify a paternalistic Western culture with Christian religious belief and practice. Neil writes with equanimity but points out that present ecumenical thinking was foreign (...)
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  2. A History of Greek Philosophy, Volume II: The Presocratic Tradition from Parmenides to Democritus. [REVIEW]J. B. D. - 1966 - Review of Metaphysics 19 (4):811-811.
    This volume continues the grouping of natural philosophers with cosmological interests and moral philosophers. With the natural philosophers, the contrast is between those who deny that true being can be found in the sensible world and those atomists who react to this monism in favour of the multiplicity of the sensible world. Since the exactly opposite conclusion has been recently maintained, Guthrie's assertion that Parmenides distinguished the concept of eternity from the concept of everlastingness is of particular interest. Of course, (...)
     
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  3.  18
    A Humane Society. [REVIEW]J. B. D. - 1966 - Review of Metaphysics 19 (4):823-823.
    A collection of addresses given by men of various backgrounds at the First Institute of Ethics arranged by Beth Tzedec Congregation, Toronto.—D. J. B.
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  4.  13
    Alcibiades I. [REVIEW]J. B. D. - 1966 - Review of Metaphysics 19 (4):817-817.
    The Platonic School regarded the Alcibiades I as the most suitable introduction to Plato. Proclus' wideranging discussion includes later Neoplatonism as well as questions of Aristotelian logic. O'Neill's translation is always readable and his commentary helpful without being fussy.—D. J. B.
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  5.  25
    An Introduction to Parapsychology. [REVIEW]J. B. D. - 1966 - Review of Metaphysics 19 (3):591-591.
    For anyone intrigued by the possibility of the so-called "psi phenomena", this is a rather interesting, even entertaining book to ponder. Kahn describes an entire gamut of unusual or weird happenings and gives the biographies of a number of persons supposedly possessing occult powers. Philosophers would probably be more cautious in their interpretations than Kahn who has a tendency to claim that every important thinker has had a vital fascination with psi phenomena.—D. J. B.
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  6.  9
    Aspects of Christian Social Ethics: Some Basic Questions. [REVIEW]J. B. D. - 1966 - Review of Metaphysics 19 (4):812-812.
    Arguing from a sort of reasonable Protestant ethic, Henry offers a worthwhile and sometimes quite practical analysis of a Christian social ideal. In Henry's approach, no "prattling about love" can take the place of justice when the latter is what is needed.—D. J. B.
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  7. Christ's Church: Evangelical, Catholic, and Reformed. [REVIEW]J. B. D. - 1965 - Review of Metaphysics 19 (2):386-386.
    In explicating the terms "Evangelical," "Catholic," and "Reformed," Vassady outlines what he thinks are the essential characteristics of any new Church communion. His analysis generally develops along classical or Neo-Orthodox Protestant lines, as is most obvious in his treatment of the apostolic succession of the episcopacy. The new Church will have a functional episcopacy but "without declaring any particular doctrine of the episcopacy." Given Vassady's theological leanings and conception of the Church, it is somewhat anomalous that he thinks organic unity (...)
     
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  8.  2
    Four Dialectical Theories of Poetry: An Aspect of English Neoclassical Criticism. [REVIEW]J. B. D. - 1966 - Review of Metaphysics 19 (4):815-815.
    Marsh borrows Richard McKeon's methodological notion of the "problematic" approach to intellectual history. Concentrating on their dialectical character, English criticism from 1650-1800 is explored in the writings of the third Earl of Shaftesbury, Mark Akenside, David Hartley, and James Harris.—D. J. B.
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  9.  16
    From Jesus to Christianity. [REVIEW]J. B. D. - 1965 - Review of Metaphysics 19 (1):151-151.
    The thesis is that any connection between Jesus and Christianity is accidental at best. Jesus was a vibrant personality capable of stirring crowds to eschatological hopes. Later followers, notably Paul, invest the simple Galilean with all the features of a Hellenic cult savior, even attributing to him a "magically reanimated corpse." Anyone interested in an adequate discussion of the development of the Biblical kerygma will not find it in this book.—D. J. B.
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  10.  18
    Five Philosophers. [REVIEW]J. B. D. - 1966 - Review of Metaphysics 19 (4):822-822.
    This is a standard selection of readings taken from Aristotle, Descartes, Hume, Kant, and James. The introduction and commentary are not sufficient to distinguish this anthology from similar introductions—D. J. B.
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  11.  28
    Ghazali's Unique Unknowable God. [REVIEW]J. B. D. - 1966 - Review of Metaphysics 19 (3):600-601.
    Using rather standard techniques of linguistic philosophy, the author develops an historical and critical analysis of Ghazali's doctrine of God as utterly unique and unknowable. Divine uniqueness and unknowability are logically implied by the statement "There is one god, Allah" and are therefore not "self-refuting" but are simply analytic statements of honorific and not descriptive value. The important historical question arises then as to how Ghazali can logically talk about God "revealing" himself. Shehadi attempts to rescue Ghazali from this logical (...)
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  12.  19
    Introduction to Comparative Philosophy. [REVIEW]J. B. D. - 1965 - Review of Metaphysics 19 (2):382-382.
    Raju offers a comprehensive interpretation of Western, Chinese, and Indian philosophy, using the two central concepts of "inwardness" and "outwardness" to delineate the essential tendencies of each tradition. Western Philosophy has overemphasized "outwardness", Indian Philosophy "inwardness", while Chinese Philosophy, being mostly concerned with man as social animal, reached a golden mean but failed to produce deep metaphysical speculation. Raju contends that the various traditions should be evaluated in terms of how much each one has contributed to a "full and complete (...)
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  13. Jesus: The Man, the Mission, and the Message. [REVIEW]J. B. D. - 1965 - Review of Metaphysics 19 (1):150-150.
    This is an exceptionally good introduction to a critical life of Jesus. The first chapters are filled with useful information about Hebrew life, culture, and legend. Connick is aware of the results of Form Criticism but adopts the more moderate position of Bornkamm. Numerous factors controlled the authenticity of the early traditions and prevented them from running rampant. In the discussion of miracles, the Virgin Birth, and the Resurrection, Connick attempts to deal with the multitude of objections which have been (...)
     
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  14.  8
    Love, Knowledge, and Discourse in Plato. [REVIEW]J. B. D. - 1967 - Review of Metaphysics 20 (4):732-732.
    Starting from Plato's statement in the Seventh Letter that Plato never intended to write down his philosophy in systematic form, Sinaiko conceives of the dialogues as attempts to combine the power of the spoken word with the written word while avoiding the limitations of either. Dramatic form and philosophic content are interdependent. The three dialogues are interrogated for statements about dialectic, and each dialogue's account of dialectic is taken to be complete in itself. It is not simply a dialectical method (...)
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  15.  26
    Metaphysics. [REVIEW]J. B. D. - 1966 - Review of Metaphysics 19 (3):585-585.
    Father Dougherty's textbook is relatively indistinguishable from a host of similar Thomistic manuals. There are the invariable definitions of being, substances, causality, etc., followed by the usual refutations of alien philosophies plus the inevitable series of pedagogical questions at the end of each chapter. It is curious that despite the continual fulminations of certain neo-Thomists against textbook Thomism, there appears a new harvest of such textbooks every year.—D. J. B.
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  16. Parmenides: A Text with Translation, Commentary, and Critical Essays by Leonardo Taran. [REVIEW]J. B. D. - 1965 - Review of Metaphysics 19 (2):385-385.
     
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  17. Parmenides: A Text with Translation, Commentary, and Critical Essays. [REVIEW]J. B. D. - 1965 - Review of Metaphysics 19 (2):385-385.
    Along with a line by line translation and interpretation of the fragments, are four essays: "Parmenides' Concept of Being," "Aletheia and Doxa," "The World of Appearance Described in the Doxa," and "Parmenides in the Ancient Philosophical Tradition." Parmenides did not understand the logical connection between time and process: undifferentiated Being is without process but, curiously enough, possesses temporal duration. The philosophical tradition wrongly interpreted the Doxa as Parmenides' cosmogony. In short, this important book is a splendid example of painstaking scholarship. (...)
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  18.  14
    Paradise on Earth: Some Thoughts on European Images of Non-European Man. [REVIEW]J. B. D. - 1966 - Review of Metaphysics 19 (4):804-804.
    Interpreting European reactions to the outside world from the beginning of European history to the end of the nineteenth century, Baudet discusses Utopian literature, the idea of the "noble savage," and the search for the temporal and geographical location of paradise. Baudet argues that the more historically oriented and self-satisfied cultures were less inclined toward a nostalgic paradise. All in all, this is a fascinating little essay in social history.—D. J. B.
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  19.  13
    Philosophical Thinking. [REVIEW]J. B. D. - 1967 - Review of Metaphysics 20 (4):712-712.
    Beardsley and Beardsley are to be congratulated for providing a definitively "non-run-of-the-mill" introductory text which is entirely intelligible for the beginner and yet genuinely philosophical in content and presentation. Twelve very well written chapters, each with a bibliography, cover most of the important problems in metaphysics, epistemology, and ethics. The authors even try to convey that philosophy has human and moral relevance beyond game activity. A significant feature of the book is its intelligent and prolonged discussion of religious beliefs. The (...)
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  20.  22
    Religious Philosophies of the West. [REVIEW]J. B. D. - 1965 - Review of Metaphysics 19 (2):385-385.
    Thomas surveys most of the major philosophers attempting to analyze each figure as a representative of different religious philosophies. While the expositions are competent, much of the material has been well-worked by similar studies. It is unfortunate that the author did not develop his own, often very pertinent, critical remarks usually argued from the standpoint of some form of modified theism. The book, however, is useful as an introductory text or for review purposes.—D. J. B.
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  21.  22
    Science, Culture and Man. [REVIEW]J. B. D. - 1965 - Review of Metaphysics 19 (2):390-390.
    A series of amorphous essays, including one by S. Radhakrishnan, so general in content as to be of dubious value. For those who have a developed sense of whimsey, there are a few striking aphorisms to be garnered here and there in the volume.—D. J. B.
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  22.  14
    Studies in Nineteenth-Century Jewish Intellectual History. [REVIEW]J. B. D. - 1967 - Review of Metaphysics 20 (4):745-745.
    As indicated by the title, this book contains seven very scholarly essays on Jewish life and thought in the 19th century. Of particular interest to philosophers is Prof. Emil L. Fackenheim's essay, "Samuel Hirsch and Hegel: A Study of Hirsch's Religionsphilosophie der Juden." In this essay, Fackenheim's masterful knowledge of Hegel is clearly visible. The thirty page essay contains a profound awareness of the theological problems inherent in Hegel's philosophy of religion as well as an awareness of how these problems (...)
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  23.  9
    Socrates to Sartre: A History of Philosophy. [REVIEW]J. B. D. - 1966 - Review of Metaphysics 19 (4):818-818.
    This book gives the beginning student one more passable text to chose for an introductory survey of the history of Western philosophy. Surveys of this sort usually contain some questionable assertions—e.g., referring to Aquinas' proof of God from motion, Stumpf states: "Potentiality means the absence of something and is therefore nothing...". But Stumpf writes clearly enough and includes a useful bibliography.—D. J. B.
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  24.  6
    The Composition and Order of the Fourth Gospel. [REVIEW]J. B. D. - 1966 - Review of Metaphysics 19 (3):601-601.
    This is a splendid study for anyone interested in the minutiae of the authorship and sources of John's Gospel. Bultmann argued for five sources: 1) revelation discourses used in the prologue and elsewhere; 2) a semeia or sign source for the miracle stories; 3) a source underlying the Johannine passion narrative but also incorporating elements of the resurrection tradition; 4) the ecclesiastical redactor who added material and gave the gospel its traditional order; 5) the work of the evangelist himself. Smith (...)
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  25.  53
    The Case for Calvinism. [REVIEW]J. B. D. - 1966 - Review of Metaphysics 19 (4):819-819.
    Van Til attempts to slay the beast of liberal Protestantism as it rears its ugly head in the writings of three American professors of theology. Van Til's position, though a minority one, is important enough but somehow his major arguments suffer from a certain lack of penetration into the issues.—D. J. B.
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  26.  17
    Teilhard de Chardin and the Mystery of Christ. [REVIEW]J. B. D. - 1967 - Review of Metaphysics 20 (4):725-725.
    Concentrating on Teilhard's Christological interests, this book, written by a fellow Jesuit, is eminently successful in showing the essentially theological character and motivation behind Teilhard's speculations. Christology permeates the supposedly scientific theory of evolution. In Teilhard's universe, Christ is the physical center for mankind and for the material world. This vision of Teilhard's, almost Pauline in scope, is the fascination and the consternation of both theologians and scientists. A concluding chapter treats of some of the theological "risks" implicit in Teilhard's (...)
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  27.  19
    Theological Dictionary of the New Testament. [REVIEW]J. B. D. - 1965 - Review of Metaphysics 19 (1):165-165.
    This, the second volume in the English translation of the famous Theologisches Wörterbuch zum Neuen Testament, covers the Greek words in the delta to eta section of the lexicon. An indispensable exegetical aid, the entire volume is a treasury of information, but of particular interest is the discussion of dike, one of those key New Testament concepts at the heart of subsequent theological speculation.—D. J. B.
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  28.  45
    The Dead Sea Scrolls. [REVIEW]J. B. D. - 1965 - Review of Metaphysics 19 (1):156-156.
    This is the first in a series of college texts dealing with biblical archaeology. Written in outline form, the book gives a clear account of the discovery and significance of the Dead Sea Scrolls. A careful analysis is offered for the content of each set of scrolls. Chapter XIX is a comparison of the Qumran sect and early Christianity. Numerous parallels in faith and rite can be drawn between the two groups: e.g., Messianic and eschatological beliefs as well as similar (...)
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  29.  27
    The Framework of the New Testament Stories. [REVIEW]J. B. D. - 1965 - Review of Metaphysics 19 (2):371-371.
    Though the individual chapters appeared as essays in various journals, their cogency and urbane scholarship make them particularly noteworthy in book form. In the chapter "Social Problems in the Early Church" Ehrhardt suggests an important methodological principle: the history of theological development cannot ignore the social conditions of the little people who accepted the Christian message. The most demanding chapter of the book, "Creatio ex Nihilo," is also the most unsatisfactory. Ehrhardt has command of the historical sources, but his treatment (...)
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  30.  14
    The Gospel According to John. [REVIEW]J. B. D. - 1966 - Review of Metaphysics 19 (3):603-603.
    This is Volume IV in the Evangelical Commentary on the Bible. As one might expect, the authors avoid novelty—which does not detract from the value of their work. A lengthy introduction provides a lucid summary of contemporary scholarship on the influence, distinctive features, background, problems, and text of the Fourth Gospel. The authors incline to the view that the Gospel is at least the "witness" of the Apostle John though the actual writing may have been done by a later "John (...)
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  31.  10
    The Giants of Pre-Sophistic Greek Philosophy: An Attempt to Reconstruct their Thoughts. [REVIEW]J. B. D. - 1966 - Review of Metaphysics 19 (4):807-807.
    Using the principles and sometimes the conclusions of his teacher Adolf Stöhr, Cleve insists that he is giving a philosophical interpretation and not simply a philological reconstruction of these Pre-Socratics. The philosophers have been divided into 1) "Religious Reformers", 2) "Philosophers of Nature", 3) "Champions of Culture Politics"—"The Glossomorphics". There will certainly be disagreement on some of Cleve's interpretations but it must be said that Cleve carries through his philosophical reconstruction with admirable lucidity and consistency though, occasionally, some of his (...)
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  32.  20
    Tout Homme Est Mon Prochain. [REVIEW]J. B. D. - 1966 - Review of Metaphysics 19 (3):584-584.
    This is a collection of Professor De Koninck's incidental writings, treating of such topics as "Contre l'antisémitisme," "Pie IX sur l'ignorance invincible de la vraie religion," "Ce qui est à César," et al. Whatever the intrinsic merits of these essays, they will be of interest to anyone who has followed the late Professor De Koninck's career as a scholar, teacher, and dedicated Catholic layman.—D. J. B.
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  33.  23
    The Philosophy of Nietzsche. [REVIEW]J. B. D. - 1966 - Review of Metaphysics 19 (3):609-609.
    This is a well-chosen anthology selected from the Levy translation but topically arranged according to Karl Schlechta's German edition. Professor Clive's rather elegant introduction, despite occasional lapses into apparent rhetoric, is penetrating. Clive interprets Nietzsche "dialectically," in terms of Nietzsche's "love-hate relationship to himself." Nietzsche's contributions to philosophy, philology, artistic criticism, and to the literature of stunning aphorisms are all duly noted. But Nietzsche emerges as typically modern in that his own irony, at his best moments, was itself subject to (...)
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  34.  17
    The Reformation. [REVIEW]J. B. D. - 1966 - Review of Metaphysics 19 (3):582-583.
    This, the third volume in The Pelican History of the Church, offers an extremely perspicacious view of the entire period. While there were nationalistic, economic, and political interests responsible for the Reformation and while there was no one, simple religious motivation, underlying all of these causes was a profound dissatisfaction with the moral and religious tone of late medieval society. However haltingly and destructively the Reformation proceeded, it is evident that the result was a general strengthening of authentic religious life (...)
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  35.  20
    Thomas Stapleton and the Counter Reformation. [REVIEW]J. B. D. - 1966 - Review of Metaphysics 19 (4):816-816.
    Writing in Elizabethan English and Renaissance Latin, Stapleton was one of the leading controversialists in the Catholic Counter Reformation of the sixteenth century. Two areas of specific disagreement were the problem of justification and church government but Stapleton could indulge in the usual bitter polemics of the period by emphasizing Protestant abuses and minimizing similar conditions on the Catholic side. Father O'Connell writes well and is in control of the sources.—D. J. B.
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  36.  31
    Utopia. [REVIEW]J. B. D. - 1966 - Review of Metaphysics 19 (3):594-595.
    This beautifully definitive edition of More's Utopia, the fourth volume in the Yale Edition of the complete works, appears on the four hundred and fiftieth anniversary of the original composition. The latin text used is the one of March 1518 ; but included is a complete list of variant readings from the 1516, 1517, and November 1518 editions. Using a lucid revision of G. C. Richards' translation, Hexter and Surtz provide a wealth of helpful details about the textual, linguistic, historical, (...)
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  37.  25
    Who Do Men Say That I Am? [REVIEW]J. B. D. - 1965 - Review of Metaphysics 19 (1):153-153.
    This book is a sort of junior search for the historical Jesus. The authoress throws in a dash of dialectic by interlarding the cursory text with questions for the reader. The presentation of complex exegetical and theological problems is so oversimplified that this book should prove equally embarrassing for both the liberals and the orthodox.—D. J. B.
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  38.  37
    What Is Art? [REVIEW]J. B. D. - 1966 - Review of Metaphysics 19 (3):612-612.
    The selections in this anthology range from Plato to Tolstoy, concentrating mainly on the Greeks, Kant, and representative figures from eighteenth-century Britain. All of the standard authors are included and speak for themselves. Sesonske has contributed a short but insightful introduction suggesting that a myriad of questions really underlie the seemingly simple question "What is art?" and showing that in each historical period of aesthetic theory there is a shift of terminology and interest. Professor Sesonske has also drawn up an (...)
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  39.  27
    Who is Man? [REVIEW]J. B. D. - 1966 - Review of Metaphysics 19 (4):813-813.
    Hardly a systematic anthropology, Heschel's book, which has at times an almost devotional flavor, contains enough insights, aphorisms, moral intuitions, and wise asides to be worth reading.—D. J. B.
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  40. Who Do Men Say That I Am? [REVIEW]J. B. D. - 1965 - Review of Metaphysics 19 (1):153-153.
    This book is a sort of junior search for the historical Jesus. The authoress throws in a dash of dialectic by interlarding the cursory text with questions for the reader. The presentation of complex exegetical and theological problems is so oversimplified that this book should prove equally embarrassing for both the liberals and the orthodox.—D. J. B.
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  41. Utopia. [REVIEW]J. B. D. - 1966 - Review of Metaphysics 19 (3):594-594.
    This beautifully definitive edition of More's Utopia, the fourth volume in the Yale Edition of the complete works, appears on the four hundred and fiftieth anniversary of the original composition. The latin text used is the one of March 1518 ; but included is a complete list of variant readings from the 1516, 1517, and November 1518 editions. Using a lucid revision of G. C. Richards' translation, Hexter and Surtz provide a wealth of helpful details about the textual, linguistic, historical, (...)
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