18 found
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D. Gareth Jones [14]D. G. Jones [4]
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D. G. H. Jones
University of Waterloo
  1.  17
    Confucianism and Organ Donation: Moral Duties From Xiao (Filial Piety) to Ren.Jing-Bao Nie & D. Gareth Jones - 2019 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 22 (4):583-591.
    There exists a serious shortage of organs for transplantation in China, more so than in most Western countries. Confucianism has been commonly used as the cultural and ethical reason to explain the reluctance of Chinese and other East-Asian people to donate organs for medical purposes. It is asserted that the Confucian emphasis on xiao requires individuals to ensure body intactness at death. However, based on the original texts of classical Confucianism and other primary materials, we refute this popular view. We (...)
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  2.  25
    Enhancement: Are Ethicists Excessively Influenced by Baseless Speculations?D. G. Jones - 2006 - Medical Humanities 32 (2):77-81.
    Most commentators draw a sharp distinction between therapy and enhancement, applauding therapy and rejecting enhancement. Not only is this distinction unclear but enhancement is often seen in grandiose terms in which human beings are radically transformed. Such far-reaching visions are then used to reject current procedures such as pre-implantation genetic diagnosis. To overcome this highly problematic impasse, enhancement has been divided into three categories, ranging from the health-related enhancement of category 1, through the non-health-related enhancement of category 2, to the (...)
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  3.  2
    From Undergraduate to Postgraduate Uses of the Dead Human Body: Consequential Ethical Shift.D. Gareth Jones - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (7):474-475.
    The dependence of surgical training programmes on the supply of bodies by for-profit organisations places them at serious ethical risk. These risks, with their commodification of the bodies used in the programme, are outlined. It is concluded that this is not a satisfactory model for the trainees’ subsequent interaction with living patients and that a code of practice is required.
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  4.  24
    Stored Human Tissue: An Ethical Perspective on the Fate of Anonymous, Archival Material.D. G. Jones - 2003 - Journal of Medical Ethics 29 (6):343-347.
    The furore over the retention of organs at postmortem examination, without adequate consent, has led to a reassessment of the justification for, and circumstances surrounding, the retention of any human material after postmortem examinations and operations. This brings into focus the large amount of human material stored in various archives and museums, much of which is not identifiable and was accumulated many years ago, under unknown circumstances. Such anonymous archival material could be disposed of, used for teaching, used for research, (...)
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  5.  9
    Brain Birth and Personal Identity.D. G. Jones - 1989 - Journal of Medical Ethics 15 (4):173-185.
    The concept of brain birth has assumed a position of some significance in discussions on the status of the human embryo and on the point in embryonic development prior to which experimental procedures may be undertaken on human embryos. This paper reviews previous discussions of this concept, which have placed brain birth at various points between 12 days' and 20 weeks' gestation and which have emphasised the symmetry of brain birth and brain death. Major developmental features of brain development are (...)
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  6.  20
    Reorienting Bioethics by Releasing It From Any Religious Moorings.D. Gareth Jones & Maja Whitaker - 2012 - American Journal of Bioethics 12 (12):24-26.
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  7.  32
    I See Dead People: Insights From the Humanities Into the Nature of Plastinated Cadavers. [REVIEW]Mike R. King, Maja I. Whitaker & D. Gareth Jones - 2014 - Journal of Medical Humanities 35 (4):361-376.
    Accounts from the humanities which focus on describing the nature of whole body plastinates are examined. We argue that this literature shows that plastinates do not clearly occupy standard cultural binary categories of interior or exterior, real or fake, dead or alive, bodies or persons, self or other and argue that Noël Carroll’s structural framework for horrific monsters unites the various accounts of the contradictory or ambiguous nature of plastinates while also showing how plastinates differ from horrific fictional monsters. In (...)
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  8.  14
    Religious Traditions and Embryo Science.D. Gareth Jones & Maja Whitaker - 2009 - American Journal of Bioethics 9 (11):41-43.
  9.  10
    Guthrie Cards: Legal and Ethical Issues.Katie Elkin & D. Gareth Jones - 2000 - New Zealand Bioethics Journal 1 (2):22-26.
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  10.  13
    The Tenuous World of Plastinates.D. Gareth Jones & Maja I. Whitaker - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (4):27 – 29.
  11.  22
    Fetal Neural Transplantation: Placing the Ethical Debate Within the Context of Society's Use of Human Material.D. Gareth Jones - 1991 - Bioethics 5 (1):23–43.
  12.  37
    Finding a Context for Discussing Human Life-Extension.D. Gareth Jones & Maja Whitaker - 2009 - American Journal of Bioethics 9 (12):77-79.
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  13. Valuing People Human Value in a World of Medical Technology.D. Gareth Jones - 1999
     
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  14.  71
    The Problematic Symmetry Between Brain Birth and Brain Death.D. G. Jones - 1998 - Journal of Medical Ethics 24 (4):237-242.
    The possible symmetry between the concepts of brain death and brain birth (life) is explored. Since the symmetry argument has tended to overlook the most appropriate definition of brain death, the fundamental concepts of whole brain death and higher brain death are assessed. In this way, a context is provided for a discussion of brain birth. Different writers have placed brain birth at numerous points: 25-40 days, eight weeks, 22-24 weeks, and 32-36 weeks gestation. For others, the concept itself is (...)
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  15.  20
    The Contested Realm of Displaying Dead Bodies.D. Gareth Jones & Maja I. Whitaker - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (10):652-653.
    The Viewpoint article expressed the feelings of unease often encountered at the display of human corpses in museums, whether relating to prehistoric or recent times. The reasons frequently stem from what is seen as a lack of respect for the remains of another human being. In this instance, the underlying concerns are that the corpses are displayed naked, along with lack of consent from anyone with an interest in them. While these are legitimate queries, ethical interests extend further afield to (...)
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  16.  13
    Genetic Privacy and the Use of Archival Human Material in Genetic Studies – Current Perspectives.D. Gareth Jones - forthcoming - Medicolegal and Bioethics:43.
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  17.  11
    Is Multiple Authorship in Conceptual Bioethics Ethically Sustainable?D. Gareth Jones - 2011 - American Journal of Bioethics 11 (10):30 - 32.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 11, Issue 10, Page 30-32, October 2011.
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  18.  23
    Before I Was an Embryo, I Was a Pre-Embryo: Or Was I?D. Gareth Jones & Barbara Telfer - 1995 - Bioethics 9 (1):32–49.