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  1. Developing the Duty to Treat: HIV, SARS, and the Next Epidemic.J. Dwyer & D. F.-C. Tsai - 2008 - Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (1):7-10.
    SARS, like HIV, placed healthcare workers at risk and raised issues about the duty to treat. But philosophical accounts of the duty to treat that were developed in the context of HIV did not adequately address some of the ethical issues raised by SARS. Since the next epidemic may be more like SARS than HIV, it is important to illuminate these issues. In this paper, we sketch a general account of the duty to treat that arose in response to HIV. (...)
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    The Bioethical Principles and Confucius' Moral Philosophy.D. F.-C. Tsai - 2005 - Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (3):159-163.
    This paper examines whether the modern bioethical principles of respect for autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence, and justice proposed by Beauchamp and Childress are existent in, compatible with, or acceptable to the leading Chinese moral philosophy—the ethics of Confucius. The author concludes that the moral values which the four prima facie principles uphold are expressly identifiable in Confucius’ teachings. However, Confucius’ emphasis on the filial piety, family values, the “love of gradation”, altruism of people, and the “role specified relation oriented ethics” will (...)
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    Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research Debates: A Confucian Argument.D. F.-C. Tsai - 2005 - Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (11):635-640.
    Human embryonic stem cell research can bring about major biomedical breakthroughs and thus contribute enormously to human welfare, yet it raises serious moral problems because it involves using human embryos for experiment. The “moral status of the human embryo” remains the core of such debates. Three different positions regarding the moral status of the human embryo can be categorised: the “all” position, the “none” position, and the “gradualist” position.The author proposes that the “gradualist” position is more plausible than the other (...)
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    The WMA Medical Ethics Manual.D. F.-C. Tsai - 2006 - Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (3):163-163.
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    The Morality of Inclusion: A Response to Duffy.D. F.-C. Tsai - 2004 - Journal of Medical Ethics 30 (5):504-504.
    In July 2002, I had the honour to be invited to give a 15 minute presentation on behalf of my country, Taiwan, on the topic of “Current system of national guidance on human subject protection in medical research” in a panel discussion of the Forum for Ethical Review Committees in Asia and the Western Pacific , World Health Organization international conference held in Chin-Mai, Thailand. In that conference, four delegates from Taiwan had a rare and therefore very precious opportunity to (...)
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