Results for 'D. C. J.'

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  13
    Rationality and the Wish to Die--a Response to Clarke.D. C. J. Ryan - 2000 - Journal of Medical Ethics 26 (3):217-217.
    sirIn a scholarly and thought-provoking paper, Clarke sets out to debunk the concept ofrational suicideas nonsensical.1 His motivation in this is to undermine any (...) support that the notion of rational suicide might give to acategorical right to suicide”. If his enterprise were successful, however, it would go far beyond therights issueand would have a profound impact on all arguments raised in support of euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide.Clarke's major thrust might be termed the argument from posthumous ignorance. He begins with a claim that the process of making a rational decision involves the process ofgaining all possible facts and `imagining' all possible consequences”. He goes on to say that making a rational decisionin the consideration of life or death . . . would seem to be impossible”. It isimpossible” …. (shrink)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  27
    What is the Relationship Between Aphantasia, Synaesthesia and Autism?C. J. Dance, M. Jaquiery, D. M. Eagleman, D. Porteous, A. Zeman & J. Simner - 2021 - Consciousness and Cognition 89:103087.
  3.  16
    Zur Sache des Denkens[REVIEW]D. C. J. - 1970 - Review of Metaphysics 23 (4):743-743.
    This volume, which contains the 1962 lecture "Zeit und Sein," is the most important publication by Heidegger since Unterwegs zur Sprache appeared in 1959. Bearing the same (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  4.  53
    One or Two Types of Death? Attitudes of Health Professionals Towards Brain Death and Donation After Circulatory Death in Three Countries.D. Rodríguez-Arias, J. C. Tortosa, C. J. Burant, P. Aubert, M. P. Aulisio & S. J. Youngner - 2013 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (3):457-467.
    This study examined health professionals’ (HPs) experience, beliefs and attitudes towards brain death (BD) and two types of donation after circulatory death (DCD)—controlled and uncontrolled DCD. (...)Five hundred and eighty-seven HPs likely to be involved in the process of organ procurement were interviewed in 14 hospitals with transplant programs in France, Spain and the US. Three potential donation scenariosBD, uncontrolled DCD and controlled DCDwere presented to study subjects during individual face-to-face interviews. Our study has two main findings: (1) In the context of organ procurement, HPs believe that BD is a more reliable standard for determining death than circulatory death, and (2) While the vast majority of HPs consider it morally acceptable to retrieve organs from brain-dead donors, retrieving organs from DCD patients is much more controversial. We offer the following possible explanations. DCD introduces new conditions that deviate from standard medical practice, allow procurement of organs when donorsloss of circulatory function could be reversed, and raises questions aboutdeathas a unified concept. Our results suggest that, for many HPs, these concerns seem related in part to the fact that a rigorous brain examination is neither clinically performed nor legally required in DCD. Their discomfort could also come from a belief that irreversible loss of circulatory function has not been adequately demonstrated. If DCD protocols are to achieve their full potential for increasing organ supply, the sources of HPsdiscomfort must be further identified and addressed. (shrink)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  5.  8
    Phänomenologie Und Theologie[REVIEW]D. C. J. - 1971 - Review of Metaphysics 25 (2):353-354.
    This volume, dedicated to Rudolph Bultmann, contains the text of a lecture held in 1927 and that of a letter addressed to the participants in a colloquium (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  6.  37
    Gender Equality in the Work of Local Research Ethics Committees in Europe: a Study of Practice in Five Countries.C. J. Moerman, J. A. Haafkens, M. Soderstrom, E. Rasky, P. Maguire, U. Maschewsky-Schneider, M. Norstedt, D. Hahn, H. Reinerth & N. McKevitt - 2007 - Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (2):107-112.
    Background: Funding organisations and research ethics committees should play a part in strengthening attention to gender equality in clinical research. In the research policy of European Union (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  7. Neuroscience and Philosophy: Brain, Mind, and Language.M. Bennett, D. C. Dennett, P. M. S. Hacker & J. R. & Searle (eds.) - 2007 - Columbia University Press.
    "Neuroscience and Philosophy" begins with an excerpt from "Philosophical Foundations of Neuroscience," in which Maxwell Bennett and Peter Hacker question the ...
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  8.  16
    AEsthetic Judgment.C. J. Ducasse & D. W. Prall - 1930 - Philosophical Review 39 (3):311.
    Direct download (4 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  9.  19
    Kant's Moral Religion[REVIEW]D. C. J. - 1971 - Review of Metaphysics 24 (4):760-760.
    Wood's book argues for the integral place of the "moral arguments"--the arguments for freedom, immortality, and the existence of God--in Kant's total philosophical work. (...)These arguments have always been the object of some suspicion not only as regards their internal plausibility but also because it has been maintained that they constitute a surreptitious reintroduction of the speculative way of arguing clearly banned by the first Critique. This suspicion was reinforced by Adickes' edition of the Opus Postumum in which the editor contended that Kant had therein repudiated the moral arguments in favor of a personal experience of God through the Categorical Imperative. Wood's argument to the contrary is vigorous and extremely interesting. He holds that Kant's notion of "rational faith" is a profound religious insight, one whose importance Wood does not hesitate to say is directly proportionate to that of the critical theory itself.--J. D. C. (shrink)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  10.  6
    Direct Observation of Magnetic Domains by Scanning Electron Microscopy.D. C. Joy & J. P. Jakubovics - 1968 - Philosophical Magazine 17 (145):61-69.
  11.  9
    A Three-Dimensional Dislocation Field Crystal Plasticity Approach Applied to Miniaturized Structures.C. J. Bayley¶, W. A. M. Brekelmans & M. G. D. Geers - 2007 - Philosophical Magazine 87 (8-9):1361-1378.
  12.  2
    Religion, Philosophy, and Psychical Research.C. J. Ducasse & C. D. Broad - 1954 - Philosophical Review 63 (2):256.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  13.  18
    In Situanalysis of the Tensile Deformation Mechanisms in Extruded Mg1Mn1Nd.C. J. Boehlert, Z. Chen, A. Chakkedath, I. Gutiérrez-Urrutia, J. Llorca, J. Bohlen, S. Yi, D. Letzig & M. T. Pérez-Prado - 2013 - Philosophical Magazine 93 (6):598-617.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  14.  23
    Ethical Decision-Making About Older Adults and Moral Intensity: an International Study of Physicians.D. C. Malloy, J. Williams, T. Hadjistavropoulos, B. Krishnan, M. Jeyaraj, E. F. McCarthy, M. Murakami, S. Paholpak, J. Mafukidze & B. Hillis - 2008 - Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (4):285-296.
    Through discourse with international groups of physicians, we conducted a cross-cultural analysis of the types of ethical dilemmas physicians face. Qualitative analysis was used to categorise (...)the dilemmas into seven themes, which we compared among the physicians by country of practice. These themes were a-theoretically-driven and grounded heavily within the text. We then subjected the dilemmas to an analysis of moral intensity, which represents an important theoretical perspective of ethical decision making. These constructs represent salient determinants of ethical behaviour and our cross-cultural sample afforded us the opportunity to consider both the pragmatic aspects of culture, as they are perceived by physicians, as well as the theory-driven concept of moral intensity. By examining both culture and moral intensity, we hope to better elucidate the complexities of ethical decision-making determinants among physicians in their daily practice. Doing so may potentially have practical implications for ethics training of medical students and foreign physicians. (shrink)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  15.  32
    D.C.Pozzi, J.M. Wickersham (Edd.): Myth and the Polis. (Myth and Poetics) Ithaca, London: Cornell University Press, 1991[REVIEW]C. Sourvinou-Inwood - 1996 - The Classical Review 46 (1):81-83.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. The Psychology of Self-Deception as Illustrated in Literary Characters.C. J. Frost, Michael Arfken & D. Brock - 2001 - Janus Head: Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies in Literature, Continental Philosophy, Phenomenological Psychology, and the Arts 4 (2):331-354.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  17.  15
    A New Case for the Liberal Arts.D. G. Winter, D. C. Mcclelland & A. J. Stewart - 1983 - British Journal of Educational Studies 31 (2):167-168.
  18.  4
    Irradiation Damage in Molybdenum After Energetic H+and He++Ion Bombardment.C. J. Beevers & D. J. Mazey - 1962 - Philosophical Magazine 7 (78):1061-1064.
  19.  5
    Lectures on Psychical Research, Incorporating the Perrott Lectures Given in Cambridge University in 1959 and 1960.C. J. Ducasse & C. D. Broad - 1964 - Philosophical Review 73 (3):412.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  20.  64
    Greek Burial Customs[REVIEW]John Pollard, D. C. Kurtz & J. Boardman - 1973 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 93 (4):250-251.
  21.  16
    ReligieusHistorische Studie over Herodotus. By G.C.J. Daniëls. Pp. 202. Antwerp: Standaard-Boekhandel, 1946.E. D. Phillips & G. C. J. Daniels - 1949 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 69:107-108.
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22.  33
    Greek Vases: Lectures by J. D. Beazley[REVIEW]Lucilla Burn, J. D. Beazley & D. C. Kurtz - 1991 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 111:248-249.
  23.  34
    HAADF-STEM Study Ofβ′-Type Precipitates in an Over-Aged AlMgSiAg Alloy.C. D. Marioara, J. Nakamura, K. Matsuda, S. J. Andersen, R. Holmestad, T. Sato, T. Kawabata & S. Ikeno - 2012 - Philosophical Magazine 92 (9):1149-1158.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  24.  12
    Homeric Researches. By J. Th. Kakridis. Pp. Viii + 168. Lund: C. W. K. Gleerup, 1949. 15 Kr.R. D. Williams & J. Th Kakridis - 1951 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 71:268-269.
  25. On Time and Being[REVIEW]D. C. J. - 1973 - Review of Metaphysics 26 (4):757-757.
    The importance of this book, which appeared in the original German in 1969 under the title Zur Sache des Denkens, 743), is attested to by the rapidity (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26. On the Way to Language[REVIEW]D. C. J. - 1971 - Review of Metaphysics 25 (2):353-353.
    Heidegger's Unterwegs zur Sprache is one of his most important books and this English translation is a timely addition to the English edition of his "Works." (...)No other single topic is of more interest to the current commentators on Heidegger than that of language. There is a growing sense of a kinship between Heidegger and Wittgenstein and an increasing number of efforts to link continental and Anglo-American thought more closely together--all of which should be stimulated by the appearance of this translation. The work is also interesting from another perspective. The central document in the attempt to relate Heidegger to the East is found in this work in the opening dialogue between Heidegger and Professor Tezuka of the Imperial University of Tokyo about the nature of the experience of language in the East and in Western "metaphysical" Europe. The other essays, particularly "The Way to Language," offer an excellent presentation of the later Heidegger's general view of language. Original language itself, according to Heidegger, is Being and it is this which stirs man into speaking. Human utterance is the revelation or expression of Being rather than, as in the traditional view, a representation or "picture" of "objects" symbolized by sounds or words. If man is "open" to Being then Being will find in language its "house"--implying thereby that the dimensions of the house are the limits of the revealability [[sic]] of Being. Human utterance is "closed off" from "original language" insofar as "Logos" is reduced to "logistics," that is, insofar as all other talk than the mathematico-logical talk of the age of Technik is dismissed as belonging to "unreason." The translation itself is well-done. The Editors of the "Works," in consultation with Heidegger, have chosen to omit the first essay in the 1959 German original in order to publish it in another volume yet to appear. The translators have supplied us with no index, only a few footnotes, explaining their decisions, no "Introduction," no bibliography--all of which can only be regretted.--J. D. C. (shrink)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27.  5
    The End of Philosophy[REVIEW]D. C. J. - 1974 - Review of Metaphysics 27 (4):796-796.
    This volume is a translation of the last three essays of Nietzsche, Vol. II and of the essay "Overcoming Metaphysics" from Vorträge and Aufsätze. There is a (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28.  23
    A Commentary on Heidegger's "Being and Time.". [REVIEW]D. C. J. - 1971 - Review of Metaphysics 24 (4):746-746.
    As Gelven points out in his Preface, this is the only section-by-section commentary on the full text of Being and Time. Being and Time is divided (...) not only into two "divisions" of six chapters each but also into eighty-three numbered "sections". As such it provides an efficient and useful handbook for those who try to make their way through the rugged terrain of Heidegger's text, especially for the beginner. Gelven's prose is crisp and clean and uncluttered by Germanicisms. He often uses uncomplicated and helpful illustrations. The interpretation stresses the importance of the analysis of "understanding" taking § 31 as "the key to Being and Time". In fact, Gelven groups §§ 25-38 as a whole under the single heading "Understanding". Such an emphasis seems entirely legitimate. He treats the historical sources of Being and Time but often leaves them undeveloped. He is content, for example, to devote a single paragraph to Dilthey whose influence upon Heidegger is so decisive, with the comment that not much is ever said about Dilthey in English philosophical literature. One also finds it a bit hard to swallow the author's argument that "Dasein" means literally "to be here" and, in sentence form: "Here I am, open to possibilities". In all, however, Gelven's work is a distinctive contribution and not a mere reworking of already familiar themes.--J. D. C. (shrink)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29.  25
    Aspects of Jaspers' Philosophy[REVIEW]D. C. J. - 1972 - Review of Metaphysics 25 (3):560-561.
    This is the second edition of a somewhat unusual account of the philosophy of Jaspers. The "Introduction" contains an historical survey of Existentialism which is rather out (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30. Philosophy[REVIEW]D. C. J. - 1972 - Review of Metaphysics 26 (1):161-161.
    This second of the three volumes of Philosophy is entitled "Existential Elucidation". Existential man is characterized by two features, historicity and freedom. Like Heidegger, Jaspers stresses that (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31.  6
    Being, Man and Death: A Key to Heidegger[REVIEW]D. C. J. - 1971 - Review of Metaphysics 24 (3):540-540.
    Fr. James Demske first published this book in 1963 in Germany under the title: Sein, Mensch und Tod: Das Todesproblem bei Martin Heidegger. Except for minor revisions-- (...)such as changing the numeration and headings of the chapters and the occasional expansion of paragraphs--this is substantially the same book. The author follows the development of the problem of death in Heidegger through the famous discussion in Being and Time and into the later works. The fact of the continuing importance of "death" in Heidegger's work is easily overlooked. But while the phrase "Being-unto-death" disappears after Being and Time the same phenomenon of Dasein's mortality reappears in the later accounts of the "Quadrate" : the heavens and earth, gods, and mortals. Chapter six of Demske's book is one of the few and clearest accounts of this central theme in Heidegger's thought. The book as a whole, apart from its thematization of the problem of death, presents a sound appraisal and a clear overview of the development of Heidegger's "path of thought" and is, on that account too, a welcome addition to the literature.--J. D. C. (shrink)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32.  13
    Berdyaev's Philosophy: The Existential Paradox of Freedom and Necessity[REVIEW]D. C. J. - 1967 - Review of Metaphysics 20 (4):727-727.
    Dr. Fuad Nucho, a native Jordanian and presently a pastor in Yeadon, Pa., provides us with a lucid and illuminating account of the central problem of freedom (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33.  10
    Existence, Existenz and Transcendence: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Karl Jaspers[REVIEW]D. C. J. - 1972 - Review of Metaphysics 25 (4):767-767.
    Along with Charles Walraff's The Philosophy of Karl Jaspers, Schrag's work is the second book-length study of Jaspers' thought in as many years. As such (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34.  7
    Einführung in Ein Künftiges Denken: Über Marx Und Heidegger[REVIEW]D. C. J. - 1971 - Review of Metaphysics 25 (2):349-349.
    Kostos Axelos, Greek-born Professor of Philosophy at the Sorbonne and author of a trilogy in French, Le Déploiement de l'errance, and of several French translations of (...) Lucás and Heidegger, attempts an important confrontation of the two thinkers whom many regard as the major thinkers in European thought today: Marx and Heidegger. To some this is a confrontation of the left and the right, but Axelos moves in an entirely different range altogether. Heidegger himself remarks that a confrontation with Marx must be made in terms of the problem of history. Both Heidegger and Marx--to some extent as the heirs of Hegel--are philosophers of the future. Axelos' book is written from the Heideggerian standpoint, centering on Heidegger's interpretation of the present age in terms of Technik, which is itself a movement in the mission of Being. The movements of the Geschick, as Heidegger says in Der Satz vom Grund and as Axelos emphasizes, are a world-play. The task of a thinking concerned with the future is to play along with the play. The future in Marxist and Heideggerian terms is a "planetary" age, beyond all nationalism, ruled by a global or planetary technology. Thinking must decide whether and how such technology will be an instrument of liberation or of oppression. Axelos' confrontation raises many central and interesting questions: what is the relationship between Heidegger's Gelassenheit and Marx's praxis? What hope is there for a future governed by a play? etc. The book can be recommended as both original and provocative.--J. D. C. (shrink)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35.  29
    Formalism in Ethics and Non-Formal Ethics of Value[REVIEW]D. C. J. - 1974 - Review of Metaphysics 27 (4):813-814.
    One can only look with favor upon the appearance of the English translation of this tremendously important work in the history of ethical theory in twentieth century (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36.  9
    Fichte's Science of Knowledge : With First and Second Introductions[REVIEW]D. C. J. - 1971 - Review of Metaphysics 24 (3):542-542.
    One of the scandals of Anglo-American philosophical scholarship is its neglect of the German Idealist tradition. Even in the case of Hegel himself, many important works (...)are either untranslated or have received only inadequate or outdated renderings and suffer from a lack of first-rate, full-length commentaries. The situation is much worse, when one turns to Schelling and Fichte. Lachs and Heath have rendered a real service in providing us with a new translation, available in a well-bound papercover edition, of Fichte's major work, the Wissenschaftslehre of 1794, to supplant the very objectionable Kroeger translation which is, in any case, long since out of print. This is an essential work for comprehending the development of European philosophy in the short but extraordinarily productive period from 1781 to 1807. Along with Schelling's System des transzendentalen Idealismus, Fichte's Wissenschaftslehre constitutes the bridge between Kant's three Critique's and Hegel's Phenomenology. Both of the famous "Introductions" are translated in the current edition. Despite their torturous text, their renderings are clearer than one might expect. There is an extremely helpful introduction by Lachs (who also translated the "First Introduction of 1797," a German-English glossary, and a detailed index. The translators also supply the standard marginal pagination from the Gesamtausgabe of 1834-1846. In all, the work is professionally done, a permanent and much needed contribution of the study of Fichte for English-reading students.--J. D. C. (shrink)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37.  20
    Freiheit Und Tod[REVIEW]D. C. J. - 1973 - Review of Metaphysics 27 (1):147-148.
    Arnold Metzger is one of Germanys leading philosophers. He served as an assistant to Husserl at Freiburg from 1919 to 1924 and published his first major (...)bookDer Gegendstand der Erkenntnisin Husserls Jarhbuch. [[sic]] The present title is a second unchanged edition of the work which appeared in 1955, and which received a warm reception in Germany. Metzgers philosophy is concerned with working out the implications which lie in the concept of Being. There are two "mythologies" about Being which Metzger hopes to dispel. The one hypostasizes Being as something transcendent and permanent, while the other is a reductionism which hypostasizes the factual. The problem of freedom and death must be understood within the context of the question of Being so formulated. Metzgers approach is in the broad sense "existential," but it is developed out of a constant dialogue with Socrates, Plato and Kant. His German is highly readable and unencumbered. His book which is a cross section of the major themes of twentieth century German philosophy, is a thoughtful meditative study of one of the major themes in contemporary thought.—J. D. C. (shrink)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38.  46
    Heidegger-Bibliographie[REVIEW]D. C. J. - 1969 - Review of Metaphysics 23 (1):139-139.
    This work is an invaluable aid to Heidegger scholars. It brings the bibliography of Heidegger to completion through 1967. The work begins with a presentation of the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39.  19
    Heidegger[REVIEW]D. C. J. - 1970 - Review of Metaphysics 24 (1):145-146.
    Otto Pöggeler is among the most distinguished living German scholars. He is the coeditor of the new critical edition of the works of Hegel published by the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40.  21
    Heraklit[REVIEW]D. C. J. - 1971 - Review of Metaphysics 25 (1):126-127.
    This volume contains the minutes of a seminar which was held on Heraclitus in the University of Freiburg under the joint direction of Heidegger and Fink. The (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41.  21
    Heidegger and the Path of Thinking[REVIEW]D. C. J. - 1970 - Review of Metaphysics 24 (2):350-350.
    John Sallis of Duquesne University has edited this fine collection of essays on Heidegger as a tribute to the latter on the occasion of his eightieth birthday. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42.  20
    Heidegger and the Tradition[REVIEW]D. C. J. - 1971 - Review of Metaphysics 25 (2):359-360.
    With the publication of this translation the quality of Heidegger literature available in English takes a quantum leap forward. No book--save perhaps Otto Poeggeler's--can match (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43.  29
    Heidegger Et Kant[REVIEW]D. C. J. - 1972 - Review of Metaphysics 25 (3):552-552.
    This is a lengthy study which, appearing as it does contemporaneously with Sherover's Heidegger, Kant and Time, underlines the importance not only of Kant's influence on (...) Heidegger but also of Heidegger's unorthodox but intriguing interpretation of the Critique of Pure Reason. In his Introduction Declève discusses at some length Heidegger's involvement with the National Socialists, pointing out in particular Heidegger's tendency at that time to fuse the technical language of philosophy with the jargon of the Nazi ideology. It is of some importance, Declève holds, that Heidegger saw for a time the historical and political consequences of his thought in the Nazi's, whereas the political applications of Kant's thought are considerably more praiseworthy. Where Heidegger approves of Hitler's decision to withdraw--from the League of Nations, for example, Kant's thought lays the theoretical foundations of a world society. Accordingly Declève sees a radical shortcoming in Heidegger's whole approach to Kant: if it is true that Kant is laying the foundations of metaphysics, this must be understood to include the foundations of the metaphysics of morals. Heidegger ignores the second Critique. Nonetheless, Declève's treatment of his topic is, on the whole, sympathetic to Heidegger's approach to Kant, and he regards the confrontation of Heidegger and Kant as a dialogue of the greatest importance between philosophical geniuses of the highest order. The book is richly documented and very carefully executed. It is certain to become standard fare for anyone interested in Heidegger's challenging "retrieve" of Kant.--J. D. C. (shrink)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44.  20
    Heidegger, Humanism and Ethics: An Introduction to the Letter on Humanism[REVIEW]D. C. J. - 1973 - Review of Metaphysics 27 (2):377-378.
    After Being and Time itself, A Letter on Humanism is perhaps Heideggers most important work. It is a comparatively clear statement of the "later Heidegger" which (...)focuses on the possibility of a "humanism" and the meaning of "ethics" for the thinking-committed-to-being. It is also Heideggers own retrieval of Being and Time twenty years later, giving a decisive self-interpretation of the main lines of this so-called "early work." Cousineau aims at providing the reader with a "handy, scholarly tool" for interpreting the Letter. He does this in three ways. 1) He provides a running commentary on selected but important passages from the Letter, with a generous use of the original German followed by a translation or paraphrase. 2) He takes a great deal of pain with Heideggers German and does not hesitate to call the only currently available translation of the Letter in English "deplorable", a judgment this translation frequently merits. 3) Finally, he presents us with an extensive annotated bibliography of works in seven languages which has the unusual feature of being coded by the letters A, B, and C which he defines as follows: anti-humanism, i.e., the interpretation of the relation between Being and Dasein advanced by the author sees Heidegger as devaluing mans essence; metahumanism, the relationship is seen as unrealistic and mythical, and mans essence is absent; authentic humanism, the interpretor [[sic]] sees in Heideggers view a representation of mans true possibility for being human. Cousineau wisely reserves a category "D" for those whose position does not accommodate itself to these classifications. There are 95 entries in this bibliography which ranges over most of the important literature.—J.D.C. (shrink)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45.  5
    Heidegger on the Divine: The Thinker, the Poet and God[REVIEW]D. C. J. - 1975 - Review of Metaphysics 29 (2):353-354.
    This book attempts to collect Heideggers scattered and often very puzzling observations about the holy, divinity, God, and the gods in order to make them a (...)coherent statement. The first three chapters present clearly and soundly the by now familiar material of Heideggers attempt, first, to lay the foundation of metaphysics, then, to overcome metaphysics altogether. Chapter 4 draws the conclusion that Heidegger stands in opposition to any metaphysical account of God and that theology, if it is possible at all, must be nonmetaphysical. Chapter 5 argues that Heideggers approach to God, centered primarily in the account of the Geviert, is mythical rather than metaphysical, though it does not recommend that we in the twentieth century simply adopt the Homeric or Hesiodic myths. The heart of the book is Chapter 6, in which Perotti analyzes the Hölderlin commentaries. On this basis he claims that, for Heidegger, any word about Gods comingfor we live after the flight of the gods-must come from the poets. Thinking dwells in subordination to poetry, and its role is to cultivate and preserve the poets words. On the question of God for Heidegger, according to Perotti, there is nothing to do but waitfor the poets to speak. Perottis text is quite brief and, in the opening chapters, covers familiar ground. He makes no use of Phaenomenologie und Theologie. Unfortunately, he often quotes the Lohner translation of the Letter on Humanism, although he always supplies the German. On p. 27, 1934 is mentioned where 1943 is intended. There is ample footnoting, a bibliography, and an index.—J.D.C. (shrink)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46.  10
    Hermeneutic Phenomenology: The Philosophy of Paul Ricoeur[REVIEW]D. C. J. - 1973 - Review of Metaphysics 27 (2):392-392.
    As Ihde points out, he has undertaken the perilous task of writing a book about a philosopher who is still actively at work and developing his thought. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47.  14
    Identity and Difference[REVIEW]D. C. J. - 1970 - Review of Metaphysics 23 (4):742-743.
    Miss Stambaugh's new translation of Identität und Differenz is a welcome addition to the growing body of English translations of Heidegger. The special merit of Miss (...)Stambaugh's work is that the translator was a student of Heidegger's and was able to prepare this translation in consultation with him. Her work should be particularly well received in view of the very poor quality of the previous translation of the same work, published for some reason under the title Essays in Metaphysics. The "Introduction" is well done but regrettably short as the work stands in need of further explication. There certainly is room for an expanded introduction, as the lectures--even in both languages--barely fill their 146 pages. Miss Stambaugh's linguistic decisions are usually sound. For example, faced with the Heideggerian ambiguity of "Er-eignis," she simply combines the dual meanings into "the event of appropriation," which is as much as one can do with this critically important word in Heidegger's vocabulary.--J. D. C. (shrink)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48.  9
    In Praise of Play: Toward a Psychology of Religion[REVIEW]D. C. J. - 1970 - Review of Metaphysics 24 (1):141-141.
    The author, a professor of psychiatry and religion at Union Theological Seminary in New York, is interested in developing a religious consciousness which is in many ways (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49.  10
    Jacob Boehme: His Life and Thought[REVIEW]D. C. J. - 1969 - Review of Metaphysics 23 (2):356-356.
    Originally published in 1957 under the title Sunrise to Eternity, this Seabury edition performs the welcome service of presenting again the outstanding English exposition of Boehme's (...)mystico-philosophical thought. The book is extremely sober and scholarly, systematically demythologizing the standard account of Boehme's life and work. Many expositions of Boehme are cluttered with unlikely and distracting accounts of his personal sanctity and numerous revelations. Stoudt, however, gives a tightly argued, well-documented account of Boehme's biography, alternating chapters on Boehme's life with chapters on the works of the same period. This is extremely helpful, for it exhibits Boehme's development quite clearly. Stoudt makes it very plain that Boehme's early thought is couched in the language of alchemy but that it outgrows that strange vocabulary to become by the end of his life a mature spirituality, steeped in the earlier German mystical tradition and with a speculative depth which anticipates the main lines of German idealism. Boehme is not, then, as the standard hagiographers would have him, an unlettered shoemaker, sprung untainted from the breast of God and untaught by any mortal predecessor. Stoudt is not always as clear as we would hope, but, considering Boehme's notorious obscurity he is clearer than most. While Stoudt points out Boehme's origin in the German tradition that precedes him, he underplays the dependence of Boehme on Meister Eckhardt, or at least leaves that whole problem insufficiently analyzed. There is a brief preface by Paul Tillich.--J. D. C. (shrink)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50.  80
    Kierkegaard[REVIEW]D. C. J. - 1974 - Review of Metaphysics 27 (4):816-816.
    Josiah Thompson, who has authored a previous work on Kierkegaard in 1967 and just recently edited Kierkegaard: A Collection of Critical Essays, has, with the present title, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 1000