13 found
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  1. The brain and somatic integration: Insights into the standard biological rationale for equating brain death with death.D. Alan Shewmon - 2001 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 26 (5):457 – 478.
    The mainstream rationale for equating brain death (BD) with death is that the brain confers integrative unity upon the body, transforming it from a mere collection of organs and tissues to an organism as a whole. In support of this conclusion, the impressive list of the brains myriad integrative functions is often cited. Upon closer examination, and after operational definition of terms, however, one discovers that most integrative functions of the brain are actually not somatically integrating, and, conversely, most integrative (...)
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  2.  21
    Statement in Support of Revising the Uniform Determination of Death Act and in Opposition to a Proposed Revision.D. Alan Shewmon - 2021 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 48 (5):453-477.
    Discrepancies between the Uniform Determination of Death Act (UDDA) and the adult and pediatric diagnostic guidelines for brain death (BD) (the “Guidelines”) have motivated proposals to revise the UDDA. A revision proposed by Lewis, Bonnie and Pope (the RUDDA), has received particular attention, the three novelties of which would be: (1) to specify the Guidelines as the legally recognized “medical standard,” (2) to exclude hypothalamic function from the category of “brain function,” and (3) to authorize physicians to conduct an apnea (...)
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  3.  93
    Brain Death: Can It Be Resuscitated?D. Alan Shewmon - 2009 - Hastings Center Report 39 (2):18-24.
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  4.  18
    The Case of Jahi McMath: A Neurologist's View.D. Alan Shewmon - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (S4):74-76.
    From the start, I followed the case of Jahi McMath with great interest. In December 2013, she clearly fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for brain death. As a neurologist with a special interest in chronic brain death, I was not surprised that, after she was flown to New Jersey, where she became statutorily resurrected and was treated as a comatose patient, Jahi's condition quickly improved. In 2014, her family reported that she sometimes responded to simple motor commands. I shared the general (...)
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  5.  25
    Brain Death: A Conclusion in Search of a Justification.D. Alan Shewmon - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (S4):22-25.
    At its inception, “brain death” was proposed not as a coherent concept but as a useful one. The 1968 Ad Hoc Committee of the Harvard Medical School to Examine the Definition of Brain Death gave no reason that “irreversible coma” should be death itself, but simply asserted that the time had come for it to be declared so. Subsequent writings by chairman Henry Beecher made clear that, to him at least, death was essentially a social construct, and society could define (...)
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  6. "The minimally conscious state: Definition and diagnostic criteria": Comments and reply.Diane Coleman, D. Alan Shewmon & J. T. Giacino - 2002 - Neurology 58 (3):506-507.
  7.  70
    The dead donor rule: Lessons from linguistics.D. Alan Shewmon - 2004 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 14 (3):277-300.
    : American society traditionally has assumed a univocal notion of "death," largely because we have only one word for it and, until recently, have not needed a more nuanced notion. The reality of death-processes does not preclude the reality of death events. Linguistically, "death" can be understood only as an event; there are other words for the process. Our death vocabulary should expand to reflect multiple events along the process from sickness to decomposition. Depending on context, some death-related events may (...)
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  8.  45
    The Extraordinary Case of Jahi McMath.D. Alan Shewmon & Noriko Salamon - 2021 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 64 (4):457-478.
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  9.  15
    Anencephaly: Selected Medical Aspects.D. Alan Shewmon - 1988 - Hastings Center Report 18 (5):11-19.
  10. Caution in the definition and diagnosis of infant brain death.D. Alan Shewmon - 1988 - In John F. Monagle & David C. Thomasma (eds.), Medical Ethics: A Guide for Health Professionals. Aspen Publishers. pp. 38--57.
     
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  11.  55
    D. Alan Shewmon replies.D. Alan Shewmon - 2009 - Hastings Center Report 39 (5):6-7.
  12.  51
    Ethics and Brain Death.D. Alan Shewmon - 1987 - New Scholasticism 61 (3):321-344.
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  13.  9
    D. Alan Shewmon replies.D. Alan Shewmon - 2009 - Hastings Center Report 39 (5):6-7.