12 found
Order:
Disambiguations
Cynthia D. Coe [15]Cynthia Diane Coe [1]
  1.  10
    Punishment Theory, Mass Incarceration, and the Overdetermination of Racialized Justice.Matthew C. Altman & Cynthia D. Coe - forthcoming - Criminal Law and Philosophy:1-19.
    In recent years, scholars have documented the racial disparities of mass incarceration. In this paper we argue that, although retributivism and deterrence theory appear to be race-neutral, in the contemporary U.S. context these seemingly contrary theories function jointly to rationalize racial inequities in the criminal justice system. When people of color are culturally associated with criminality, they are perceived as both irresponsible and hyperresponsible, a paradox that reflects their status as what Charles Mills calls subpersons. Following from this paradox, criminality (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  55
    The Self as Creature and Creator: Fichte and Freud Against the Enlightenment.Matthew C. Altman & Cynthia D. Coe - 2007 - Idealistic Studies 37 (3):179-202.
    The conception of subjectivity that dominates the Western philosophical tradition, particularly during the Enlightenment, sets up a simple dichotomy: either the subject is ultimately autonomous or it is merely a causally determined thing. Fichte and Freud challenge this model by formulating theories of subjectivity thattranscend this opposition. Fichte conceives of the subject as based in absolute activity, but that activity is qualified by a check for which it is not ultimately responsible. Freud explains the behavior of the self in terms (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  18
    The Sobering Up of Oedipus Levinas and the Trauma of Responsibility.Cynthia D. Coe - 2013 - Angelaki 18 (4):5-21.
    Levinas's work persistently challenges the claim that the sovereignty of the ego is the foundation for ethics, a claim he attributes to the Greek philosophical tradition. This claim emerges in dominant accounts of responsibility, in which the agent's intentions define his or her culpability. However, in Oedipus Tyrannos Sophocles also attempts to undermine this strict pairing of responsibility and deliberate choice. Oedipus undergoes a fundamentally Levinasian narrative arc by moving from self-assured sovereignty, based on his ability to comprehend the world, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  47
    Mandatory Ultrasound Laws and the Coercive Use of Informed Consent.Cynthia D. Coe & Matthew C. Altman - 2012 - Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology 16 (1):16-30.
    Requiring that a woman who is seeking an abortion be given the opportunity to view an ultrasound of her fetus has spread from anti-abortion “pregnancy resource centers” to state laws. Proponents of these laws claim that having access to the ultrasound image is necessary for a woman to make a medically informed decision. In this paper, we argue that ultrasound examinations frame fetuses visually and linguistically as persons and interpellate pregnant women as mothers, with all of the cultural meaning invested (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Emmanuel Levinas, Entre Nous: Thinking-of-the-Other. [REVIEW]Cynthia D. Coe - 2001 - Philosophy in Review 21 (2):132-134.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  36
    Linda Martín Alcoff, Visible Identities: Race, Gender, and the Self. [REVIEW]Cynthia D. Coe - 2009 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 23 (3):pp. 264-266.
  7.  27
    Willful History: Nietzsche, Nihilism, and the Possibility of Freedom.Matthew C. Altman & Cynthia D. Coe - 2004 - International Studies in Philosophy 36 (3):5-13.
  8.  21
    Contesting the Human: Levinas, the Body, and Racism.Cynthia D. Coe - 2006 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 11 (1):257-273.
    In his 1934 essay “Some Thoughts on the Philosophy of Hitlerism,”Levinas identified two major movements within contemporary culture:liberalism and Hitlerism. At one level, these two movements are in strictopposition, but Levinas’s later work explores the way in which liberalismis implicated in the “hatred of the other” that pervades Hitlerism. In thispaper, I argue that Cartesian dualism underlies two sorts of anxieties, bothof which are expressed as racism. Levinas’s reconception of the body as ethicallysignificant overcomes this dualism, and thus seems to (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  13
    The Paradoxes of Convalescent History.Cynthia D. Coe & Matthew C. Altman - 2005 - New Nietzsche Studies 6 (3/4/1/2):116-128.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  18
    Strangers and Natives: Gadamer, Colonial Discourse and the Politics of Understanding.Cynthia D. Coe - 2009 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 35 (8):921-933.
    I claim that the hermeneutic circle both describes and undermines the colonialist impulse, by mapping how our prejudices are projected out into reality but thus make themselves vulnerable to critical scrutiny. Gadamer’s attention to the way in which our prejudices should be challenged, his emphasis on the construction of the tradition that has such an influence on our understanding (and our tendency to ignore that malleability), and his resistance to the Enlightenment ideal of transcending the historical and natural given give (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  7
    James Hatley, Suffering Witness: The Quandary of Responsibility After the Irreparable. [REVIEW]Cynthia D. Coe - 2003 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 17 (1):68-70.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12.  71
    Scaffolded Writing as a Tool for Critical Thinking: Teaching Beginning Students How to Write Arguments.Cynthia D. Coe - 2011 - Teaching Philosophy 34 (1):33-50.
    In this paper I argue for the efficacy of scaffolded writing assignments in teaching critical thinking and writing in lower-division philosophy courses. Scaffolding involves converting the skills one expects students to display on a culminating assignment into a progressive series of smaller assignments, moving from papers that use relatively simple skills, such as summarizing small pieces of text, to much more complex skills, such as evaluating others’ positions, constructing their own judgments about an issue, and defending those claims. I use (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations