12 found
Order:
  1.  63
    Saintly Sacrifice: The Traditional Transmission of Moral Elevation.Craig T. Palmer, Ryan O. Begley & Kathryn Coe - 2013 - Zygon 48 (1):107-127.
    This paper combines the social psychology concept of moral elevation with the evolutionary concept of traditions as descendant-leaving strategies to produce a new explanation of the role of saints in Christianity. Moral elevation refers to the ability of prosocial acts to inspire people to engage in their own acts of charity and kindness. When morally elevating stories and visual depictions become traditional by being passed from one generation to the next, they can produce prosocial behavior advantageous to survival and reproduction (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  2.  68
    Totemism, Metaphor and Tradition: Incorporating Cultural Traditions Into Evolutionary Psychology Explanations of Religion.Craig T. Palmer, Lyle B. Steadman, Chris Cassidy & Kathryn Coe - 2008 - Zygon 43 (3):719-735.
    Totemism, a topic that fascinated and then was summarily dismissed by anthropologists, has been resurrected by evolutionary psychologists' recent attempts to explain religion. New approaches to religion are all based on the assumption that religious behavior is the result of evolved psychological mechanisms. We focus on two aspects of Totemism that may present challenges to this view. First, if religious behavior is simply the result of evolved psychological mechanisms, would it not spring forth anew each generation from an individual's psychological (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  49
    The Importance of Magic to Social Relationships.Craig T. Palmer, Lyle B. Steadman, Chris Cassidy & Kathryn Coe - 2010 - Zygon 45 (2):317-337.
    Many anthropological explanations of magical practices are based on the assumption that the immediate cause of performing an act of magic is the belief that the magic will work as claimed. Such explanations typically attempt to show why people come to believe that magical acts work as claimed when such acts do not identifiably have such effects. We suggest an alternative approach to the explanation of magic that views magic as a form of religious behavior, a form of communication that (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  41
    When to Bear False Witness: An Evolutionary Approach to the Social Context of Honesty and Deceit Among Commercial Fishers.Craig T. Palmer - 1993 - Zygon 28 (4):455-468.
  5.  23
    Yes, but It Was Never Just About the Science.Craig T. Palmer - 2002 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (4):523-524.
    Andrews et al. present a clear discussion of the various criteria needed to identify adaptations. However, they also imply a history of the debate between adaptationists and their critics that is incomplete. The history implied is one of only genuine scientific disagreement. This neglects the role of nonscientific motives and strawman arguments on behalf of the critics of adaptationists.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  52
    Myths as Instructions From Ancestors: The Example of Oedipus.Lyle B. Steadman & Craig T. Palmer - 1997 - Zygon 32 (3):341-350.
  7.  11
    Applying Signaling Theory to Traditional Cultural Rituals.Craig T. Palmer & Christina Nicole Pomianek - 2007 - Human Nature 18 (4):295-312.
    The branch of evolutionary theory known as signaling theory attempts to explain various forms of communication. Social scientists have explained many traditional rituals as forms of communication that promote cooperative social relationships among participants. Both evolutionists and social scientists have realized the importance of trust for the formation and maintenance of cooperative social relationships. These factors have led to attempts to apply signaling theory to traditional cultural rituals in various ways. This paper uses the traditional ritual of mumming in small (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  5
    Individuals, Traditions, and the Righteous.Craig T. Palmer & Kyle J. Clark - 2018 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 41.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  17
    More Women (and Men) That Never Evolved.R. Elisabeth Cornwell, Craig T. Palmer & Hasker P. Davis - 2000 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (4):598-599.
    We are not convinced by Gangestad & Simpson that differential mating strategies within each sex would be greater than such strategies between sexes. The target article does not provide actual evidence of human males who do not desire mating with multiple females, or evidence that the benefits for females of short-term matings with multiple males have ever outweighed the associated costs.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  49
    Visiting Dead Ancestors: Shamans as Interpreters of Religious Traditions.Lyle B. Steadman & Craig T. Palmer - 1994 - Zygon 29 (2):173-189.
  11.  11
    Psychological Mechanisms Versus Behavior: Does the Difference Really Make a Difference?Craig T. Palmer - 1992 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (2):398-399.
  12.  6
    Group Selection or Categorical Perception?Craig T. Palmer, B. Eric Fredrickson & Christopher F. Tilley - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):780-780.
    Humans appear to be possible candidates for group selection because they are often said to live in bands, clans, and tribes. These terms, however, are only names for conceptual categories of people. They do not designate enduring bounded gatherings of people that might be “vehicles of selection.” Hence, group selection has probably not been a major force in human evolution.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation