Results for 'Craig Carely'

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  1.  68
    Palliative Care, Public Health and Justice: Setting Priorities in Resource Poor Countries.Craig Blinderman - 2009 - Developing World Bioethics 9 (3):105-110.
    Many countries have not considered palliative care a public health problem. With limited resources, disease-oriented therapies and prevention measures take priority. In this paper, I intend to describe the moral framework for considering palliative care as a public health priority in resource-poor countries. A distributive theory of justice for health care should consider integrative palliative care as morally required as it contributes to improving normal functioning and preserving opportunities for the individual. For patients requiring terminal care , we are guided (...)
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  2.  90
    Health Care, Social Justice and the Common Good.Craig Paterson - manuscript
    This paper is essentially concerned with defending the idea of a universal right to adequate health care coverage. It will argue for the existence of a human right grounded in Catholic social thought. At the outset, a statement of clarification is needed. This paper does not pretend to offer the panacea for all ills relating to health care provision. Rather, it is an inquiry into the kinds of value that should inform decision making relating to health policy. A universal right (...)
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  3. Be Careful What You Wish For: A Reply to Craig.L. Nathan Oaklander - 2008 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 76 (1):156-163.
  4. Does Father Care Mean Fathers Share?: A Comparison of How Mothers and Fathers in Intact Families Spend Time with Children.Lyn Craig - 2006 - Gender and Society 20 (2):259-281.
    This article uses diary data from the most recent Australian Bureau of Statistics Time Use Survey to compare by gender total child care time calculated in the measurements of main activity, main or secondary activity, and total time spent in the company of children. It also offers an innovative gender comparison of relative time spent in the activities that constitute child care, child care as double activity, and time with children in sole charge. These measures give a fuller picture of (...)
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  5.  28
    Klugman, Craig M. And Pamela M. Dalinis, Eds. 2008 Ethical Issues in Rural Health Care.Robert Macauley - 2009 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 6 (4):511-512.
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  6.  3
    The Need for an Ethics of Care in the Contingency Response to Public Health Emergencies.Craig M. Klugman & Cheryl J. Erwin - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics 21 (8):40-42.
    In 2005, President George Bush read John Barry’s The Great Influenza: The Story of the Deadliest Pandemic in History. After his experiences of 9/11 and Hurricane Katrina, Bush began the first White...
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  7.  27
    Who Cares About American Workers?Craig Cox - 1992 - Business Ethics 6 (2):20-23.
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  8.  16
    Canon Law, Civil Law, and the Health Care Apostolate.Craig Paterson - 2000 - Catholic Social Science Review 5:267-281.
    This paper provides an overview of the application of canon law to the administration of Catholic heahh care in the United States. It is divided into four sections. The first section provides a context for the role of canon law in the life of the Church. The second section considers the fundamental question of juridic personality in the Church. The third section delineates the predominant forms of organization that have hitherto been the main Church related institutions providing health care. The (...)
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  9.  10
    Who Cares About American Workers?Craig Cox - 1992 - Business Ethics: The Magazine of Corporate Responsibility 6 (2):20-23.
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  10.  1
    Caring: An Expression of Being Rather Than Doing.Brian K. Burton & Craig P. Dunn - 1998 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 9:59-70.
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  11.  35
    Religious Health Care as Community Benefit: Social Contract, Covenant, or Common Good?David M. Craig - 2008 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 18 (4):pp. 301-330.
    The public responsibilities of nonprofit hospitals have been contested since the advent of the 1969 community benefit standard. The distance between the standard's legal language and its implementation has grown so large that the Internal Revenue Service issued a new reporting form for 2008 that is modeled on the Catholic Health Association's guidelines for its member hospitals. This article analyzes the appearance of an emerging moral consensus about community benefits to argue against a strict charity care mandate and in favor (...)
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  12.  31
    Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia: A Natural Law Ethics Approach.Craig Paterson - 2008 - Abingdon: Routledge.
    As medical technology advances and severely injured or ill people can be kept alive and functioning long beyond what was previously medically possible, the debate surrounding the ethics of end-of-life care and quality-of-life issues has grown more urgent. In this lucid and vigorous book, Craig Paterson discusses assisted suicide and euthanasia from a fully fledged but non-dogmatic secular natural law perspective. He rehabilitates and revitalises the natural law approach to moral reasoning by developing a pluralistic account of just why (...)
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  13.  24
    Resource Allocation in Health Care: Health Economics and Beyond.Craig Mitton & Cam Donaldson - 2003 - Health Care Analysis 11 (3):245-257.
    As resources in health care are scarce, managers and clinicians must make difficult choices about what to fund and what not to fund. At the level of a regional health authority, limited approaches to aid decision makers in shifting resources across major service portfolios exist. A participatory action research project was conducted in the Calgary Health Region. Through five phases of action, including observation of senior management meetings, as well as two sets of one-on-one interviews and two focus groups, an (...)
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  14. Everyone at the Table: Religious Activism and Health Care Reform in Massachusetts.David M. Craig - 2012 - Journal of Religious Ethics 40 (2):335-358.
    Using interviews with activists and Lisa Sowle Cahill's concept of participatory discourse, this article examines how the Greater Boston Interfaith Organization (GBIO) built solidarity for the 2006 Massachusetts health care reform law. The analysis explores the morally formative connections between GBIO's activist strategies and its public liturgy for reform. The solidarity generated through this interfaith coalition's activities and religious arguments contrasts with two standard types of policy discourse, economics and liberalism. Arguments for health care reform based on economic efficiency or (...)
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  15.  43
    The Ethics of Smart Pills and Self-Acting Devices: Autonomy, Truth-Telling, and Trust at the Dawn of Digital Medicine.Craig M. Klugman, Laura B. Dunn, Jack Schwartz & I. Glenn Cohen - 2018 - American Journal of Bioethics 18 (9):38-47.
    Digital medicine is a medical treatment that combines technology with drug delivery. The promises of this combination are continuous and remote monitoring, better disease management, self-tracking, self-management of diseases, and improved treatment adherence. These devices pose ethical challenges for patients, providers, and the social practice of medicine. For patients, having both informed consent and a user agreement raises questions of understanding for autonomy and informed consent, therapeutic misconception, external influences on decision making, confidentiality and privacy, and device dependability. For providers, (...)
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  16. God and Abstract Objects: The Coherence of Theism: Aseity.William Lane Craig - 2017 - Springer.
    This book is an exploration and defense of the coherence of classical theism’s doctrine of divine aseity in the face of the challenge posed by Platonism with respect to abstract objects. A synoptic work in analytic philosophy of religion, the book engages discussions in philosophy of mathematics, philosophy of language, metaphysics, and metaontology. It addresses absolute creationism, non-Platonic realism, fictionalism, neutralism, and alternative logics and semantics, among other topics. The book offers a helpful taxonomy of the wide range of options (...)
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  17.  1
    M. Therese Lysaught and Michael McCarthy : Catholic Bioethics and Social Justice: The Praxis of US Health Care in a Globalized World: Liturgical Press, Collegeville, MN, 2018. [REVIEW]David M. Craig - 2019 - Monash Bioethics Review 37 (3-4):136-138.
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  18.  24
    Agape As an Ethic of Care for Journalism.David Craig & John Ferré - 2006 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 21 (2-3):123-140.
    Although recent scholarship in diverse professional areas shows an ongoing interest in the application of agape - the New Testament's term for the highest order of self-giving love - no published work has made an in-depth exploration of agape in relation to journalism. This article explores what agape can contribute to media theory and practice. After explaining what distinguishes agape from other concepts of altruism and how agape can complement other approaches to compassion or minimizing harm, the analysis turns to (...)
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  19. Unpaid Work and Care During COVID-19: Subjective Experiences of Same-Sex Couples and Single Mothers in Australia.Brendan Churchill & Lyn Craig - 2021 - Gender and Society 35 (2):233-243.
    This paper draws on data from Work and Care During COVID-19, an online survey of Australians during pandemic lockdown in May 2020. It focuses on how subsamples of lesbian, gay, and bisexual mothers and fathers in couples and single mothers subjectively experienced unpaid work and care during lockdown compared with heterosexual mothers and fathers in couples, and with partnered mothers, respectively. During the pandemic, nonheterosexual fathers’ subjective reports were less negative than those of their heterosexual counterparts, but differences between heterosexual (...)
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  20.  8
    Religious Values in the Health Care Market.David M. Craig - 2008 - Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics 28 (2):223-243.
    USING QUALITATIVE INTERVIEWS AT CATHOLIC AND JEWISH HOSPITAL organizations, this essay contrasts the market-driven reforms of consumer-directed health care and physician entrepreneurship with the mission-driven structures of religious nonprofits. A structural analysis of values in health care makes a convoluted system more transparent. It also demonstrates the limitations of market reforms to the extent that they erode organizational structures of solidarity, which are needed to pool risks, shift costs, and maintain safety nets in a complex and expensive health economy.
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  21.  95
    The Impact of Economic Information on Medical Decision Making in Primary Care.Olivia Wu, Robin Knill-Jones, Philip Wilson & Neil Craig - 2004 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 10 (3):407-411.
  22.  47
    Information Structure: Afterword.Craige Roberts - 2012 - Semantics and Pragmatics 5 (7):1-19.
    As a graduate student in Linguistics at UMass/Amherst in the 1980s, I was fortunate to be exposed to a number of new developments bearing on the relationship between formal semantics and pragmatics. In the 1970s under the influence of Cresswell, Lewis, Montague, and Partee, enormous progress in semantics was made possible by narrowing the focus of the field mainly to the consideration of the conventional, truth conditional content of an indicative utterance, calculated compositionally as a function of the semantic contributions (...)
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  23. Feminist Ethics as Moral Grounding for Stakeholder Theory.Craig P. Dunn - 1996 - Business Ethics Quarterly 6 (2):133-147.
    Stakeholder theory, as a method of management based on morals and behavior, must be grounded by a theory of ethics. However, traditional ethics of justice and rights cannot completely ground the theory. Following and expanding on the work of Wicks, Gilbert, and Freeman (1994), we believe that feminist ethics, invoking principles of caring, provides the missing element that allows moral theory to ground the stakeholder approach to management. Examples are given to support the suggested general principle for making business decisions (...)
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  24. Thirst and Hydration in Palliative Care.G. Craig - 1996 - Journal of Medical Ethics 22 (6):361-361.
  25.  49
    Attitudes Toward Physician-Assisted Suicide Among Physicians in Vermont.A. Craig, B. Cronin, W. Eward, J. Metz, L. Murray, G. Rose, E. Suess & M. E. Vergara - 2007 - Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (7):400-403.
    Background: Legislation on physician-assisted suicide is being considered in a number of states since the passage of the Oregon Death With Dignity Act in 1994. Opinion assessment surveys have historically assessed particular subsets of physicians.Objective: To determine variables predictive of physicians’ opinions on PAS in a rural state, Vermont, USA.Design: Cross-sectional mailing survey.Participants: 1052 physicians licensed by the state of Vermont.Results: Of the respondents, 38.2% believed PAS should be legalised, 16.0% believed it should be prohibited and 26.0% believed it should (...)
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  26. Being Sympathetic to Bad-History Wrongdoers.Craig K. Agule - 2021 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly.
    For many philosophers, bad-history wrongdoers are primarily interesting because of what their cases might tell us about the interaction of moral responsibility and history. However, philosophers focusing on blameworthiness have overlooked important questions about blame itself. These bad-history cases are complicated because blame and sympathy are both fitting. When we are careful to consider the rich natures of those two reactions, we see that they conflict in several important ways. We should see bad-history cases as cases about whether and how (...)
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  27.  5
    Groups or Teams in Health Care: Finding the Best Fit.Deborah C. Saltman, Natalie A. O'Dea, Jane Farmer, Craig Veitch, Gaye Rosen & Michael R. Kidd - 2007 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 13 (1):55-60.
  28.  15
    Moral Distress Among Health System Managers: Exploratory Research in Two British Columbia Health Authorities. [REVIEW]Craig Mitton, Stuart Peacock, Jan Storch, Neale Smith & Evelyn Cornelissen - 2011 - Health Care Analysis 19 (2):107-121.
    Moral distress is a concept used to date in clinical literature to describe the experience of staff in circumstances in which they are prevented from delivering the kind of bedside care they believe is expected of them, professionally and ethically. Our research objective was to determine if this concept has relevance in terms of key health care managerial functions, such as priority setting and resource allocation. We conducted interviews and focus groups with mid- and senior-level managers in two British Columbia (...)
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  29.  23
    How Health Humanities Will Save the Life of the Humanities.Craig M. Klugman - 2017 - Journal of Medical Humanities 38 (4):419-430.
    In the last decade, the humanities have been shrinking in number of students, percent of faculty, and in number of degrees awarded. Humanities students also earn lower salaries than their STEM-prepared peers. At the same time, the health humanities have been in ascendance over the last fifteen years. The number of majors, minors and certificates has increased 266% in that time frame, attracting large numbers of students and preparing future patients, lay caregivers, and health care providers to interact with a (...)
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  30. Review of Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia: A Natural Law Ethics Approach. [REVIEW]Craig Paterson - 2010 - Ethics and Medicine 26 (1):23-4.
    As medical technology advances and severely injured or ill people can be kept alive and functioning long beyond what was previously medically possible, the debate surrounding the ethics of end-of-life care and quality-of-life issues has grown more urgent. In this lucid and vigorous book, Craig Paterson discusses assisted suicide and euthanasia from a fully fledged but non-dogmatic secular natural law perspective. He rehabilitates and revitalises the natural law approach to moral reasoning by developing a pluralistic account of just why (...)
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  31.  78
    Is Time Handed in a Quantum World?Craig Callender - 2000 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 100 (1):247-269.
    This paper considers the possibility that nonrelativistic quantum mechanics tells us that Nature cares about time reversal. In a classical world we have a fundamentally reversible world that appears irreversible at higher levels, e.g., the thermodynamic level. But in a quantum world we see, if I am correct, a fundamentally irreversible world that appears reversible at higher levels, e.g., the level of classical mechanics. I consider two related symmetries, time reversal invariance and what I call ‘Wigner reversal invariance.’ Violation of (...)
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  32. Review of the Logic of Conventional Implicatures by Chris Potts. [REVIEW]Patricia Amaral, Craige Roberts & E. Allyn Smith - 2007 - Linguistics and Philosophy 30 (6):707-749.
    We review Potts' influential book on the semantics of conventional implicature , offering an explication of his technical apparatus and drawing out the proposal's implications, focusing on the class of CIs he calls supplements. While we applaud many facets of this work, we argue that careful considerations of the pragmatics of CIs will be required in order to yield an empirically and explanatorily adequate account.
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  33. The Costs and Benefits of Kin.Craig Hadley - 2004 - Human Nature 15 (4):377-395.
    In this paper data from a Tanzanian horticultural population are used to assess whether mother’s kin network size predicts several measures of children’s health and well-being, and whether any kin effects are modified by household socioeconomic status. This hypothesis is further tested with a questionnaire on maternal attitudes towards kin. Results show small associations between measures of maternal kin network size and child mortality and children’s growth performance. Together these results suggest that kin positively influence child health, but the effects (...)
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  34.  12
    Data Collection, EHRs, and Poverty Determinations.Craig Konnoth - 2018 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 46 (3):622-628.
    Collecting and deploying poverty-related data is an important starting point for leveraging data regarding social determinants of health in precision medicine. However, we must rethink how we collect and deploy such data. Current modes of collection yield imprecise data that is unsuited for research. Better data can be collected by cross-referencing other sources such as employers and public benefit programs, and by incentivizing and encouraging patients and providers to provide more accurate information. Data thus collected can be used to provide (...)
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  35.  42
    The Practice of Psychology in Rural Communities: Potential Ethical Dilemmas.Craig M. Helbok - 2003 - Ethics and Behavior 13 (4):367-384.
    The practice of psychology in rural areas offers unique challenges for psychologists as they try to provide optimal care, often with a minimum of resources. Psychologists are frequently required to be creative and flexible in order to provide effective services to a wide range of clients. However, these unique challenges often confront psychologists with ethical dilemmas and problems for which their urban-based training has not prepared them. The author examines how certain characteristics of rural communities may lead to specific ethical (...)
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  36.  9
    The Trial of Joseph Dotterweich: The Origins of the “Responsible Corporate Officer” Doctrine.Craig S. Lerner - 2018 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 12 (3):493-512.
    This article analyzes the origins of the “responsible corporate officer” doctrine: the trial of Joseph Dotterweich. That doctrine holds that an officer may be personally liable for the criminal act of a subordinate if the officer was, in some indefinite way, able to prevent the violation. Applying this doctrine, the prosecution of Dotterweich entailed strict liability for a strict liability offense. The underlying offenses—the interstate sale of one misbranded and adulterated drug and one misbranded drug—were said to be strict liability (...)
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  37.  6
    Holy Terror: Confronting Our Fears and Loving Our Movie Monsters.Craig Detweiler - 2020 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 74 (2):171-182.
    While the natural world may scare us, more frightening beasts arise when we neglect our calling to care for creation and “play god” via technology. From King Kong, Frankenstein, and Godzilla to recent films like The Babadook, The Shape of Water and Us, the most enduring monsters provoke humility, evoke empathy, and prompt us to love rather than fear. These holy terrors can offer an encounter with what Rudolf Otto famously called the mysterium tremendum.
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  38.  15
    Militarism, Human Welfare, and the Apa Ethical Principles of Psychologists.Craig Summers - 1992 - Ethics and Behavior 2 (4):287 – 310.
    A case study is presented of the American Psychological Association (APA), as a health care organization that promotes human welfare. APA includes policies on human welfare in its Ethical Principles of Psychologists and even lists the advancement of psychology "as a means of promoting human welfare" on its letterhead. Nevertheless, APA has other policies and activities based on military and weapons work that appear to conflict with its promotion of human welfare. Although military work in and of itself may not (...)
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  39. Genetic Technologies and Women: The Importance of Context Inmaculada de Melo-Martín St. Mary’s University.Craig Hanks - 2001 - Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society 21 (5):354-360.
    Bioethicists, like many other academics, have a tendency to try to make things general and simpler by eliminating context. Particulars, such as race, economic class, and gender, often seem to be lost in this ocean of generality and abstraction. But in losing them, we are neglecting the analysis of serious moral problems and, with it, the possibility of offering some kind of solution to such problems. This article argues that particulars do matter very much. We will focus ourattention here on (...)
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  40.  52
    Evaluating the Outcomes of Ethics Consultation.J. M. Craig & Thomas May - 2005 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 17 (2):168-180.
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  41.  18
    Using Chinese Medicine to Understand Medicinal Herb Quality: An Alternative to Biomedical Approaches? [REVIEW]Craig A. Hassel, Christopher J. Hafner, Renne Soberg, Jeff Adelmann & Rose Haywood - 2002 - Agriculture and Human Values 19 (4):337-347.
    Chinese medicine (CM) is one ofseveral ancient systems of medical care basedupon a different worldview than the prevailingbiomedical model; it employs its own language,systems of logic, and criteria forunderstanding health and diagnosing illness.Medicinal herbs play a central role in the CMsystem of practice and knowledgeable CMpractitioners have extensive clinicalexperience using them. However, the establishedscientific and regulatory organizations thatrely upon biomedical understandings ofpathology do not accept the definitions formedicinal herb quality used by CMpractitioners. Furthermore, local medicinalherb growers within the upper Midwest (...)
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  42.  43
    Understanding the Relational Aspects of Learning with, From, and About the Other.Richard Hovey & Robert Craig - 2011 - Nursing Philosophy 12 (4):262-270.
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  43.  49
    Rejoinder to William Lane Craig.David B. Myers - 2003 - Religious Studies 39 (4):427-430.
    While I may have misunderstood certain points in Craig's Molinist theodicy, a careful reading of my article will show that Craig is incorrect in his claim that I have failed to evaluate his proposal on the basis of its asserted standard: plausibility. The heart of my argument is that Craig's theodicy is implausible because it fails to provide a credible explanation of the culpability of all non-believers. In this rejoinder I try to show (1) why an evidentialist (...)
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  44. Reflections on the Readings of Sundays and Feasts: September - November.Barry M. Craig - 2015 - The Australasian Catholic Record 92 (3):363.
    Craig, Barry M The combination of 'the eyes of the blind shall be opened' in Isaiah 35:5 and the psalm's 'the Lord gives sight to the blind' seems to be preparing the way for an account of the restoration of sight in the gospel, but its focus is instead on restoring hearing and speech. In this story, which is shared with Matthew, as with the raising of the young girl told also by Matthew and Luke, Mark alone reports the (...)
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  45.  41
    Palliative Opioid Use, Palliative Sedation and Euthanasia: Reaffirming the Distinction.Guy Schofield, Idris Baker, Rachel Bullock, Hannah Clare, Paul Clark, Derek Willis, Craig Gannon & Rob George - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (1):48-50.
    We read with interest the extended essay published from Riisfeldt and are encouraged by an empirical ethics article which attempts to ground theory and its claims in the real world. However, such attempts also have real-world consequences. We are concerned to read the paper’s conclusion that clinical evidence weakens the distinction between euthanasia and normal palliative care prescribing. This is important. Globally, the most significant barrier to adequate symptom control in people with life-limiting illness is poor access to opioid analgesia. (...)
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  46.  69
    Patient Decision-Making: Medical Ethics and Mediation.Y. J. Craig - 1996 - Journal of Medical Ethics 22 (3):164-167.
    A review of medical ethics literature relating to the importance of the participation of patients in decision-making introduces the role of rights-based mediation as a voluntary process now being developed innovatively in America. This is discussed in relation to the theory of communicative ethics and moral personhood. References are then made to the work of medical ethics committees and the role of mediation within these. Finally it is suggested that mediation is part of an eirenic ethic already being used informally (...)
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  47.  3
    Reconsidering Empathy: An Interpersonal Approach and Participatory Arts in the Medical Humanities.Erica L. Cao, Craig D. Blinderman & Ian Cross - 2021 - Journal of Medical Humanities 42 (4):627-640.
    The decline of empathy among health professional students, highlighted in the literature on health education, is a concern for medical educators. The evidence suggests that empathy decline is likely to stem more from structural problems in the healthcare system rather than from individual deficits of empathy. In this paper, we argue that a focus on direct empathy development is not effective and possibly detrimental to justice-oriented aims. Drawing on critical and narrative theory, we propose an interpersonal approach to enhance empathic (...)
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  48.  65
    Elements of an Engaged Clinical Ethics: A Qualitative Analysis of Hospice Clinical Ethics Committee Discussions.Geoffrey Hunt, Craig Gannon & Ann Gallagher - 2012 - Clinical Ethics 7 (4):175-182.
    Social, legal and health-care changes have created an increasing need for ethical review within end-of-life care. Multiprofessional clinical ethics committees (CECs) are increasingly supporting decision-making in hospitals and hospices. This paper reports findings from an analysis of formal summaries from CEC meetings, of one UK hospice, spanning four years. Using qualitative content analysis, five themes were identified: timeliness of decision-making, holistic care, contextual openness, values diversity and consensual understanding. The elements of an engaged clinical ethics in a hospice context is (...)
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  49.  20
    The Ethical Problems of the Open Label Extension Study.Kenneth Craig Micetich - 1996 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 5 (3):410.
    The institutional review board Is charged with assessing the risks and benefits of research projects Involving human subjects. Ethical considerations and federal regulations require that an IRB, in part, must find that the potential risks of participation are proportional to the potential benefits and to the Importance of the knowledge that may be learned before the IRB can approve the voluntary assumption of risk by a research participant. Adequate assessment of the risks and benefits requires careful scrutiny of the study (...)
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  50. Consistent Histories in Quantum Cosmology.David Craig & Parampreet Singh - 2011 - Foundations of Physics 41 (3):371-379.
    We illustrate the crucial role played by decoherence (consistency of quantum histories) in extracting consistent quantum probabilities for alternative histories in quantum cosmology. Specifically, within a Wheeler-DeWitt quantization of a flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmological model sourced with a free massless scalar field, we calculate the probability that the universe is singular in the sense that it assumes zero volume. Classical solutions of this model are a disjoint set of expanding and contracting singular branches. A naive assessment of the behavior of quantum (...)
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