Results for 'Corporate responsibility'

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  1. Theorising corporate citizenship. Jeremy moon, Andrew Crane and Dirk Matten / corporate power and responsibility : A citizenship perspective; Christopher Cowton / governing the corporate citizen : Reflections on the role of professionals; Tatjana schönwälder-kuntze.Corporate Citizenship From A. View - 2008 - In Jesús Conill Sancho, Christoph Luetge & Tatjana Schó̈nwälder-Kuntze (eds.), Corporate Citizenship, Contractarianism and Ethical Theory: On Philosophical Foundations of Business Ethics. Ashgate Pub. Company.
     
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  2.  18
    Voluntary codes of conduct for multinational corporations: Promises and challenges.Socially Responsible Investing & Barbara Krumsiek - 2004 - Business and Society Review 109 (4):583-593.
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  3. Corporate Responsibility.Patricia Werhane & R. Edward Freeman - 2003 - In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), The Oxford handbook of practical ethics. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 514--536.
     
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  4. Corporate Responses to Shareholder Activists: Considering the Dialogue Alternative.Kathleen Rehbein, Jeanne M. Logsdon & Harry J. Van Buren - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 112 (1):137-154.
    This empirical study examines corporate responses to activist shareholder groups filing social-policy shareholder resolutions. Using resource dependency theory as our conceptual framing, we identify some of the drivers of corporate responses to shareholder activists. This study departs from previous studies by including a fourth possible corporate response, engaging in dialogue. Dialogue, an alternative to shareholder resolutions filed by activists, is a process in which corporations and activist shareholder groups mutually agree to engage in ongoing negotiations to deal (...)
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  5.  78
    Corporate Responsibility in Scandinavian Supply Chains.Robert Strand - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 85 (S1):179 - 185.
    This article examines corporate responsibility in the supply chains of four of the largest Scandinavian multinational corporations - IKEA, Nokia, Novo Nordisk, and StatoilHydro - and offers two key findings. First, these Scandinavian companies have all implemented responsible supply chain practices where suppliers in developing nations, and the communities of these suppliers, are engaged as key stakeholders and treated as partners. Second, these supply chain practices all share the common bond of having honesty and the establishment of trust-based (...)
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  6. Against Corporate Responsibility.Lars J. K. Moen - 2024 - Journal of Social Philosophy 55 (1):44–61.
    Can a group be morally responsible instead of, or in addition to, its members? An influential defense of corporate responsibility is based on results in social choice theory suggesting that a group can form and act on attitudes held by few, or even none, of its members. The members therefore cannot be (fully) responsible for the group’s behavior; the group itself, as a corporate agent, must be responsible. In this paper, I reject this view of corporate (...)
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  7.  63
    Corporate Responsibility for Economic, Social and Cultural Rights: Rights in Search of a Remedy?Justine Nolan & Luke Taylor - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 87 (2):433 - 451.
    It is no longer a revelation that companies have some responsibility to uphold human rights. However, delineating the boundaries of the relationship between business and human rights is more vexed. What is it that we are asking corporations to assume responsibility for and how far does that responsibility extend? This article focuses on the extent to which economic, social and cultural rights fall within a corporation's sphere of responsibility. It then analyses how corporations may be held (...)
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  8.  45
    Implementing Corporate Responsibility — The Chiquita Case.Marco Were - 2003 - Journal of Business Ethics 44 (2-3):247-260.
    This article gives a practice-based overview of the implementation aspects of Corporate Responsibility. After discussing the success factors for implementing Corporate Responsibility, the article describes a model for implementing Corporate Responsibility. Special attention is given to the success factors in the subsequent phases of implementation (sensitivity to the organizational environment, awareness of core values and clear leadership), to ensure that the most optimal results attainable for the organization can be reached. The implementation-model is clarified (...)
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  9.  92
    Implementing corporate responsibility – the chiquita case.Marco Were - 2003 - Journal of Business Ethics 44 (2-3):247 - 260.
    This article gives a practice-based overview of the implementation aspects of Corporate Responsibility. After discussing the success factors for implementing Corporate Responsibility, the article describes a model for implementing Corporate Responsibility. Special attention is given to the success factors in the subsequent phases of implementation (sensitivity to the organizational environment, awareness of core values and clear leadership), to ensure that the most optimal results attainable for the organization can be reached. The implementation-model is clarified (...)
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  10.  62
    Corporate Responsibilities for Access to Medicines.Klaus M. Leisinger - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 85 (S1):3 - 23.
    Today there is a growing wave of demands being placed upon the pharmaceutical industry to contribute to improved access to medicines for poor patients in the developing countries. 1 This article aims to contribute to the development of a systematic approach and broad consensus about shared benchmarks for good corporate practices in this area. A consensus corridor on what constitutes an appropriate portfolio of corporate responsibilities for access to medicines -especially under conditions of 'failing states' and 'market failure' (...)
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  11.  72
    Undivided Corporate Responsibility: Towards a Theory of Corporate Integrity.Thomas Maak - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 82 (2):353-368.
    In the years since Enron corporate social responsibility, or “CSR,” has become a ubiquitous phenomenon in both research and business practice. CSR is used as an umbrella term to describe much of what is done in terms of ethics-related activities in firms around the globe to such an extent that some consider it a “tortured concept” (Godfrey and Hatch 2007, Journal of Business Ethics 70, 87–98). Addressing this skepticism, I argue in this article that the focus on CSR (...)
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  12. Is Corporate Responsibility Converging? A Comparison of Corporate Responsibility Reporting in the USA, UK, Australia, and Germany.Stephen Chen & Petra Bouvain - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 87 (1):299 - 317.
    Corporate social reporting, while not mandatory in most countries, has been adopted by many large companies around the world and there are now a variety of competing global standards for non-financial reporting, such as the Global Reporting Initiative and the UN Global Compact. However, while some companies (e. g., Henkel, BHP, Johnson and Johnson) have a long standing tradition in reporting non-financial information, other companies provide only limited information, or in some cases, no information at all. Previous studies have (...)
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  13.  12
    Corporate Responsibility in the Global Village: The British Role Model and the American Laggard.Susan Ariel Aaronson - 2003 - Business and Society Review 108 (3):309-338.
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  14.  43
    Corporate Responsibility Standards: Current Implications and Future Possibilities for Peace Through Commerce.Charles P. Koerber - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 89 (S4):461 - 480.
    Calls for greater corporate responsibility have resulted in the creation of various extralegal mechanisms to shape corporate behavior. The number and popularity of corporate responsibility standards has grown tremendously in the last three decades. Current estimates suggest there may be over 300 standards that address various aspects of corporate behavior and responsibility (e. g., working conditions, human rights, protection of the natural environment, transparency, bribery). However, little is known about how these standards relate (...)
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  15.  24
    Synthesising Corporate Responsibility on Organisational and Societal Levels of Analysis: An Integrative Perspective.Pasi Heikkurinen & Jukka Mäkinen - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 149 (3):589-607.
    This article develops an integrative perspective on corporate responsibility by synthesising competing perspectives on the responsibility of the corporation at the organisational and societal levels of analysis. We review three major corporate responsibility perspectives, which we refer to as economic, critical, and politico-ethical. We analyse the major potential uses and pitfalls of the perspectives, and integrate the debate on these two levels. Our synthesis concludes that when a society has a robust division of moral labour (...)
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  16. Corporate responsibility and judgment aggregation.Frank Hindriks - 2009 - Economics and Philosophy 25 (2):161-177.
    Paradoxical results concerning judgment aggregation have recently been invoked to defend the thesis that a corporate agent can be morally responsible for a decision without any of its individual members bearing such responsibility. I contend that the arguments offered for this irreducibility thesis are inconclusive. They do not pay enough attention to how we evaluate individual moral responsibility, in particular not to the role that a flawed assessment of the normative reasons that bear on the issue to (...)
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  17.  26
    Corporate responsibility for the termination of digital friends.Nick Munn & Dan Weijers - 2023 - AI and Society 38 (4):1501-1502.
  18.  40
    Corporate responsibility perceptions in change: Finnish managers' views on stakeholder issues from 1994 to 2004.Johanna Kujala - 2009 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 19 (1):14-34.
    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the changes in Finnish managers' corporate responsibility perceptions from 1994 to 2004. Following earlier research, the concept of corporate responsibility is operationalised using the stakeholder approach. Empirically, we ask how managers' views on stakeholder issues have changed during the 10-year research period, and how managers' stakeholder orientation compares with their economic orientation. The data were collected using a survey research instrument in the years 1994, 1999 and 2004. The (...)
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  19.  16
    Corporate responsibility perceptions in change: Finnish managers' views on stakeholder issues from 1994 to 2004.Johanna Kujala - 2009 - Business Ethics: A European Review 19 (1):14-34.
    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the changes in Finnish managers' corporate responsibility perceptions from 1994 to 2004. Following earlier research, the concept of corporate responsibility is operationalised using the stakeholder approach. Empirically, we ask how managers' views on stakeholder issues have changed during the 10‐year research period, and how managers' stakeholder orientation compares with their economic orientation. The data were collected using a survey research instrument in the years 1994, 1999 and 2004. The (...)
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  20. Real Corporate Responsibility.Eric Palmer - 2004 - In John Hooker & Peter Madsen (eds.), International Corporate Responsibility Series. Carnegie Mellon University Press. pp. 69-84.
    The Call for Papers for this conference suggests the topic, “international codes of business conduct.” This paper is intended to present a shift from a discussion of codes, or constraints to be placed upon business, to an entirely different topic: to responsibility, which yields duty, and the reciprocal concept, right. Beyond the framework of external regulation and codes of conduct, voluntary or otherwise, lies another possible accounting system: one of real corporate responsibility, which arises out of the (...)
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  21. Corporate responsibility and corporate personhood.Rita C. Manning - 1984 - Journal of Business Ethics 3 (1):77 - 84.
    In this paper, I consider the claim that a corporation cannot be held to be morally responsible unless it is a person. First, I argue that this claim is ambigious. Person flags three different but related notions: metaphysical person, moral agent, moral person. I argue that, though one can make the claim that corporates are metaphysical persons, this claim is only marginally relevant to the question of corporate moral responsibility. The central question which must be answered in discussions (...)
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  22.  59
    Sustainable Bonuses: Sign of Corporate Responsibility or Window Dressing?Ans Kolk & Paolo Perego - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 119 (1):1-15.
    Despite a strong plea for integrating sustainability goals into traditional corporate bonus schemes, a comprehensive implementation of these systems has been lacking until recently. This article explores four illustrative cases from the Netherlands, where several multinationals started to pioneer with sustainable bonuses in the past few years. The article examines the setups and the different elements of bonus programmes used, in terms of performance criteria (focusing in particular on external vs. internal benchmarking), their link to specific stakeholders, type and (...)
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  23.  28
    Corporate Responsibility in the Collective Age: Toward a Conception of Collaborative Responsibility.Florian Wettstein - 2012 - Business and Society Review 117 (2):155-184.
    In this article, I will argue that it is time to rethink and reconfigure some of the established assumptions underlying our conception of moral responsibility. Specifically, there is a mismatch between the individualism of our common sense morality and the imperative for collaborative responses to global problems in what I will call the “collective age.” This must have an impact also on the way we think about the responsibility of corporations. I will argue that most plausibly we ought (...)
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  24.  58
    Corporate Responsibilities in Internet-Enabled Social Networks.Stephen Chen - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 90 (S4):523 - 536.
    As demonstrated by the popularity of social networking sites such as Facebook and Twitter, Internet-based social networks have become an important part of daily life, and many businesses are now involved in such networks either as service providers or as participants. Furthermore, inter-organizational networks are becoming an increasingly common feature of many industries, not only on the Internet. However, despite the growing importance of networks for businesses, there is little theoretical study on the social responsibilities of businesses in such networks, (...)
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  25.  26
    Corporate responsibility and the plurality of market aims.Jeffery Smith - 2019 - Business and Society Review 124 (2):183-199.
    A number of recent authors, most notably Joseph Heath, have persausively defended a market‐centered account of corporate responsibility that grounds standards of business conduct upon the normative presuppositions of the market. They have us focus on two important items: first, the value of welfare, or Pareto efficient outcomes, which underwrites the legitimacy of market arrangements; and second, the behavioral requirements needed to assure that corporations conduct business in a manner consistent with this value. This article critically examines the (...)
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  26. Beyond Corporate Responsibility: Implications for Management Development.Sandra Waddock & Malcolm Mcintosh - 2009 - Business and Society Review 114 (3):295-325.
    Since the mid‐1990s we have witnessed the rise of numerous constructive and positive activities aimed at developing or enhancing corporate responsibility and corporate citizenship as well as anti‐globalization and anticorporate activism. And, of course, in 2008, we witnessed the meltdown of financial markets and numerous financial institutions as well as some major companies teetering on the brink of collapse. What is actually needed to create the world that many people want to live in may in fact be (...)
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  27. Corporate responsibility and its constituents.Kenneth E. Goodpaster - 2010 - In George G. Brenkert & Tom L. Beauchamp (eds.), The Oxford handbook of business ethics. New York: Oxford University Press.
     
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  28.  10
    Corporate Responsibility.R. Edward Freeman & Patricia H. Werhane - 2005 - In R. G. Frey & Christopher Heath Wellman (eds.), A Companion to Applied Ethics. Oxford, UK: Blackwell. pp. 552–569.
    This chapter contains sections titled: A Brief History of Corporate Responsibility The Nature of Corporate Obligations and the Scope of Corporate Responsibility Some Promising Approaches to the Study of Corporate Responsibility Corporate Responsibility and the Limits of Minimalism.
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  29.  57
    Corporate Responsibility Revisited.Philip Pettit - 2009 - Netherlands Journal of Legal Philosophy 38 (2):159-176.
    This paper responds to four commentaries on “Responsibility Incorporated”, restating, revising, and expanding on existing work. In particular, it looks again at a set of issues related primarily to responsibility at the individual level; it reconsiders responsibility at the corporate level; it examines the connection of this discussion to issues of responsibility in law and politics.
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  30.  3
    Corporate Responsibility and Repair for Anti-Black Racism.Tabitha Celeste Mustafa - forthcoming - Business Ethics Quarterly:1-32.
    In an era when the public and shareholders increasingly demand greater accountability from institutions for racial injustice and slavery, scholarship on corporate reparations is more and more essential. This article argues that corporations have played a significant role in the cultural dehumanization of Blackness and therefore have a particular responsibility to make repair. Cultural dehumanization refers to embedding anti-Blackness into US culture in service of capitalist profit accumulation, which has resulted in status and material inequalities between Blacks and (...)
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  31.  10
    Promoting Corporate Responsibility in Private Banking: Necessary and Sufficient Conditions for Joining the Wolfsberg Initiative Against Money Laundering.Martino Maggetti - 2014 - Business and Society 53 (6):787-819.
    In recent years, the fight against money laundering has emerged as a key issue of financial regulation. The Wolfsberg Group is an important multistakeholder agreement establishing corporate responsibility principles against money laundering in a domain where international coordination remains otherwise difficult. The fact that 10 out of the 25 top private banking institutions joined this initiative opens up an interesting puzzle concerning the conditions for the participation of key industry players in the Wolfsberg Group. The article presents a (...)
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  32.  24
    Historic Corporate Responsibility.Judith Schrempf & Guido Palazzo - 2012 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 23:26-37.
    During the last years, historic injustices have been on top of the public agenda revolving around the question of how to deal with difficult pasts. This applies togovernments but also to corporations. We aim at addressing this trend of historic corporate responsibility. We examine corporations as intergenerational moral agents, introduce the problem of historic complicity, and propose a concept of historic corporate responsibility.
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    Corporate Responsibility and Corporate Reputation: Two Separate Concepts or Two Sides of the Same Coin?Carola Hillenbrand & Kevin Money - 2007 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 18:157-161.
    In response to the IABS conference theme to “advise practitioners,” this paper is framed in terms of two questions that have been found to be critical to practitioners. These are “what is Corporate Responsibility and how to do it” and “what is the value of Corporate Responsibility.” The paper uses theories from within the academic literature to develop a model to answer these two practitioner-based questions. An empirical framework based upon the model is developed and tested (...)
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  34.  15
    Assuming corporate responsibilities in lawless situations: case study of a news media organization.Sushanta Kumar Mishra & Kunal Kamal Kumar - 2016 - Asian Journal of Business Ethics 5 (1 - 2):81-95.
    Corporate responsibility is considered the “epitome of corporate ethics.” In “the balanced concept of the firm,” a corporation is seen as a moral agent that has a balanced approach to managing three interrelated and equally important responsibilities viz. economic, social, and environmental. The case study aims to advance our understating of the “triple bottom line approach to CSR” by showing how a news media organization committed itself to dispensing its corporate responsibilities despite facing lawless situations. Through (...)
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  35. Corporate Responsibility and Freedom.Eric Palmer - 2007 - International Corporate Responsibility Series 3:25-33.
    Milton Friedman’s famous comment on Corporate Social Responsibility is that “there is one and only one social responsibility of business—to use its resources and engage in activities to increase its profits so long as it stays within the rules of the game.” I reply to Friedman, Michael Jensen, and others, in argument that accepts their implicit premise—that business can be a virtuous mechanism of free society—but that denies their delimitation of responsibility. The reply hinges upon precisely (...)
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  36.  24
    Corporate response to an ethical incident: the case of an energy company in New Zealand.Gabriel Eweje & Minyu Wu - 2010 - Business Ethics 19 (4):379-392.
    The ethical behaviour and social responsibility of private companies, and in particular large corporations, is an important area of enquiry in contemporary social, economic and political thinking. In the past, a company's behaviour would be considered responsible as long as it stayed within the law of the society in which it operated or existed. Although this may be necessary, it is no longer sufficient. In this paper, we examine an energy company's response to an ethical incident in New Zealand (...)
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  37.  48
    Corporate Responsibility Revisited.John Forge - 2002 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 16 (1):13-32.
    The fact that corporate responsibility supervenes on human action implies that there are two possible kinds of account of the former, namely reductive accounts in which the responsibility of the corporation devolves down without remainder to its officers, and those in which it does not. Two versions of the latter are discussed here. The first, due to Peter French, tries to satisfy the supervenience requirement by defining corporate action in terms of human action. It is argued (...)
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  38.  80
    A Holistic Corporate Responsibility Model: Integrating Values, Discourses and Actions.Tarja Ketola - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 80 (3):419-435.
    The corporate responsibility (CR) discussion has so far been rather fragmented as academics tackle it from their own areas of expertise, which guarantees in-depth analyses, but leaves room for broader syntheses. This research is a synthetic, interdisciplinary exercise: it integrates philosophical, psychological and managerial perspectives of corporate responsibility into a more holistic CR-model for the benefit of academics, companies and their interest groups. CR usually comprises three areas: environmental, social and economic responsibilities. In all these areas (...)
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  39.  10
    Putting Corporate Responsibility into Practice: Examining the Gap Between Strategic Plans and Operational Actions.Johanna Kujala, Paula Merikari & Jenni Enroth - 2007 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 18:192-196.
    The purpose of this paper is to analyse the gap between the strategic and operational levels of corporate responsibility. The strategic level of corporateresponsibility refers to the strategic plans concerning corporate responsibility which are examined by looking at the corporate responsibility documents. The operational level stands for the everyday actions of retailers which are analysed through interviews of nine retailers. The gap between the strategic plans and operational actions is described and analysed to understand (...)
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  40.  84
    Corporate Responsibility, Democracy, and Climate Change.Denis G. Arnold - 2016 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 40 (1):252-261.
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  41.  41
    Corporate response to an ethical incident: the case of an energy company in New Zealand.Gabriel Eweje & Minyu Wu - 2010 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 19 (4):379-392.
    The ethical behaviour and social responsibility of private companies, and in particular large corporations, is an important area of enquiry in contemporary social, economic and political thinking. In the past, a company's behaviour would be considered responsible as long as it stayed within the law of the society in which it operated or existed. Although this may be necessary, it is no longer sufficient. In this paper, we examine an energy company's response to an ethical incident in New Zealand (...)
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  42.  28
    Making Corporations Responsible: The Parallel Tracks of the B Corp Movement and the Business and Human Rights Movement.Joanne Bauer & Elizabeth Umlas - 2017 - Business and Society Review 122 (3):285-325.
    The business and human rights movement shares several goals with the Benefit Corporation movement: corporations respecting human rights; maintaining a “wide aperture” so that all impacts of a company on people and communities are addressed; and creating rigorous standards of conduct and means of accountability. This paper argues that nonetheless the movements are traveling along parallel tracks and thus missing an opportunity for mutual learning that can improve their effectiveness. The BHR movement can look to B Corps for concrete examples (...)
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  43.  14
    Corporate Responses to Intimate Partner Violence.Layla Branicki, Senia Kalfa, Alison Pullen & Stephen Brammer - 2023 - Journal of Business Ethics 187 (4):657-677.
    Intimate partner violence (IPV) is among society’s most pernicious and impactful social issues, causing substantial harm to health and wellbeing, and impacting women’s employability, work performance, and career opportunity. Organizations play a vital role in addressing IPV, yet, in contrast to other employee- and gender-related social issues, very little is known regarding corporate responses to IPV. IPV responsiveness is a specific demonstration of corporate social responsibility and is central to advancing gender equity in organizations. In this paper, (...)
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  44.  4
    Corporate Responsibility and the Morality of the Market.Wim Dubbink & Willem van der Deijl - 2023 - In Wim Dubbink & Willem van der Deijl (eds.), Business Ethics: A Philosophical Introduction. Springer Nature Switzerland. pp. 87-110.
    This chapter deals with the question to what extent market participants can have moral responsibilities. It starts with a discussion on the nature of responsibility, and then raises the question whether organizations, such as companies can bear responsibility (at all). While some philosophers have been skeptical, we list some reasons to think that companies can be moral agents. Subsequently, we discuss whether companies actually should assume moral responsibilities. There are a number of commonly heard arguments about why companies (...)
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    Corporate Responsibility in Adverse Pecuniary Externalities.Albino Barrera - 2005 - International Corporate Responsibility Series 2:145-156.
    The United States, Europe and Japan provide farm subsidies at a rate of one billion USD per day. The bulk of this is captured by large corporate entities. Damage to less developed countries is extensive and deep. Besides the farmers who are harmed because of the resulting lower agricultural prices, these negative effects ripple through the rest of the economy, due to the central importance of the agricultural sector for developing nations. Besides being direct beneficiaries of these subsidies, farming (...)
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  46.  23
    Corporate Responsibility and Compliance with the Law: A Case Study of Land, Dispossession, and Aftermath at Newmont's Ahafo Project in Ghana 1.Radu Mares - 2012 - Business and Society Review 117 (2):233-280.
    An important part of responsible business practices is compliance with the law. This article details what actually happens when the laws of the host country fail to ensure adequate protection. The focus here is on land dispossession and loss of livelihood in relation to a gold mine project in central Ghana. How is it that a well‐known international company—Newmont—with its own corporate social responsibility (CSR) statements sets up a project in the year 2003 that displaces subsistence farmers from (...)
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  47.  26
    Corporate Responsibility as an Arena for Partnered Governance: From the Business to the Public Policy Case.Atle Midttun - 2007 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 18:222-227.
    By highlighting the specific characteristics of corporate-responsibility(CR)-oriented public governance and juxtaposing them with more traditional regulatoryapproaches, this paper will highlight some of the issues, challenges and policy tools associated with this regulatory orientation. Through stylized examples the paper also illustrates how CR-oriented public governance, interfacing with CR-oriented business strategies may play itself out in the global economy.
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  48.  23
    Corporate Responses to HIV/AIDS: Experience and Leadership from South Africa.Pamela L. Bolton - 2008 - Business and Society Review 113 (2):277-300.
    ABSTRACTHIV/AIDS harms the viability and competitiveness of African businesses. As a consequence, companies increasingly subscribe to the view that taking a proactive role to combat HIV/AIDS is not simply a question of compassion and good corporate citizenship. Rather, these firms see assertive action against HIV as critical to their long‐term profitability, and some have concluded that it is cost effective even in the short term. The article discusses how South African companies are taking action against HIV in ways that (...)
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  49.  36
    Corporate Responsibility as a Strategic Element in the Systemic Approach to Sustainable Community Health Care.Betty Dee Makani-lim & Felix Chan Lim - 2007 - International Corporate Responsibility Series 3:145-172.
    This paper presents the critical role of corporate responsibility in the sustainability of health care programs in lower income communities mostly located in the rural areas. The Leaders for Health Program (LHP)—a tri-partite partnership between the Philippine Department of Health, the Health Unit of the Ateneo de Manila University Graduate School of Business, and Pfizer Philippines, Inc.—is an innovative approach focusing on health promotion and education as the cornerstone for community development. LHP adopts a systemic and comprehensive approach (...)
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  50.  36
    International Corporate Responsibility in the Context of Development: The Case of the Mining Sector in Zambia with Special Reference to Indian and Chinese Investments.Venkatesh Seshamani - 2009 - International Corporate Responsibility Series 4:337-348.
    Development is a process of achieving a right balance between economic growth and psychic income growth. A foreign investor’s manner of conducting business in a country could result in any of four scenarios in which economic/psychic income is low/inadequate, high/inadequate, low/adequate, or high/adequate. Foreign investment will contribute to development only if it reflects the fourth scenario. A responsible corporation can contribute to money income and more importantly to psychic income of a company’s workers. This paper examines the corporate (...) performance of Indian and Chinese investments in Zambia’s mining sector. The paper finds that while Chinese companies seem to be operating close to the first scenario, Indian companies are operatingbetween the first and fourth. Thus, neither of them is contributing to true development. (shrink)
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