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  1.  10
    ‘The Body Says It’: The Difficulty of Measuring and Communicating Sensations of Breathlessness.Alice Malpass, Coreen Mcguire & Jane Macnaughton - 2022 - Medical Humanities 48 (1):63-75.
    Breathlessness is a sensation affecting those living with chronic respiratory disease, obesity, heart disease and anxiety disorders. The Multidimensional Dyspnoea Profile is a respiratory questionnaire which attempts to measure the incommunicable different sensory qualities of breathlessness. Drawing on sensorial anthropology we take as our object of study the process of turning sensations into symptoms. We consider how shared cultural templates of ‘what counts as a symptom’ evolve, mediate and feed into the process of bodily sensations becoming a symptom. Our contribution (...)
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    ‘X-Rays Don't Tell Lies’: The Medical Research Council and the Measurement of Respiratory Disability, 1936–1945.Coreen Mcguire - 2019 - British Journal for the History of Science 52 (3):447-465.
    During the first half of the twentieth century, the mining industry in Britain was subject to recurrent disputes about the risk to miners’ lungs from coal dust, moderated by governmental, industrial, medical and mining bodies. In this environment, precise measurements offered a way to present uncontested objective knowledge. By accessing primary source material from the National Archives, the South Wales Miners Library and the University of Bristol's Special Collections, I demonstrate the importance that the British Medical Research Council attached to (...)
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    Phyllis M. Tookey Kerridge and the Science of Audiometric Standardization in Britain.Jaipreet Virdi & Coreen Mcguire - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Science 51 (1):123-146.
    The provision of standardized hearing aids is now considered to be a crucial part of the UK National Health Service. Yet this is only explicable through reference to the career of a woman who has, until now, been entirely forgotten. Dr Phyllis Margaret Tookey Kerridge was an authoritative figure in a variety of fields: medicine, physiology, otology and the construction of scientific apparatus. The astounding breadth of her professional qualifications allowed her to combine features of these fields and, later in (...)
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