Results for 'Control, Robotics, Mechatronics'

988 found
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  1.  8
    Adaptable robots, ethics, and trust: a qualitative and philosophical exploration of the individual experience of trustworthy AI.Stephanie Sheir, Arianna Manzini, Helen Smith & Jonathan Ives - forthcoming - AI and Society:1-14.
    Much has been written about the need for trustworthy artificial intelligence (AI), but the underlying meaning of trust and trustworthiness can vary or be used in confusing ways. It is not always clear whether individuals are speaking of a technology’s trustworthiness, a developer’s trustworthiness, or simply of gaining the trust of users by any means. In sociotechnical circles, trustworthiness is often used as a proxy for ‘the good’, illustrating the moral heights to which technologies and developers ought to aspire, at (...)
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  2.  68
    Social robots and the risks to reciprocity.Aimee van Wynsberghe - 2022 - AI and Society 37 (2):479-485.
    A growing body of research can be found in which roboticists are designing for reciprocity as a key construct for successful human–robot interaction (HRI). Given the centrality of reciprocity as a component for our moral lives (for moral development and maintaining the just society), this paper confronts the possibility of what things would look like if the benchmark to achieve perceived reciprocity were accomplished. Through an analysis of the value of reciprocity from the care ethics tradition the richness of reciprocity (...)
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  3.  32
    Robot, let us pray! Can and should robots have religious functions? An ethical exploration of religious robots.Anna Puzio - forthcoming - AI and Society 1:1-17.
    Considerable progress is being made in robotics, with robots being developed for many different areas of life: there are service robots, industrial robots, transport robots, medical robots, household robots, sex robots, exploration robots, military robots, and many more. As robot development advances, an intriguing question arises: should robots also encompass religious functions? Religious robots could be used in religious practices, education, discussions, and ceremonies within religious buildings. This article delves into two pivotal questions, combining perspectives from philosophy and religious studies: (...)
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  4.  15
    Robot and ukiyo-e: implications to cultural varieties in human–robot relationships.Osamu Sakura - 2022 - AI and Society 37 (4):1563-1573.
    The social and cultural causes behind the widespread use and acceptance of robots in Japan are not yet completely understood. This study compares humans and robots in images gathered through Google searches in Japanese and in English. Numerous pictures obtained by the search in Japanese were found to have a human and a robot looking together at something else (“third item”), whereas many of the images acquired by search in English show a human and a robot facing each other. This (...)
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  5.  47
    Can we wrong a robot?Nancy S. Jecker - 2023 - AI and Society 38 (1):259-268.
    With the development of increasingly sophisticated sociable robots, robot-human relationships are being transformed. Not only can sociable robots furnish emotional support and companionship for humans, humans can also form relationships with robots that they value highly. It is natural to ask, do robots that stand in close relationships with us have any moral standing over and above their purely instrumental value as means to human ends. We might ask our question this way, ‘Are there ways we can act towards robots (...)
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  6.  36
    God-like robots: the semantic overlap between representation of divine and artificial entities.Nicolas Spatola & Karolina Urbanska - 2020 - AI and Society 35 (2):329-341.
    Artificial intelligence and robots may progressively take a more and more prominent place in our daily environment. Interestingly, in the study of how humans perceive these artificial entities, science has mainly taken an anthropocentric perspective (i.e., how distant from humans are these agents). Considering people’s fears and expectations from robots and artificial intelligence, they tend to be simultaneously afraid and allured to them, much as they would be to the conceptualisations related to the divine entities (e.g., gods). In two experiments, (...)
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  7.  35
    A critique of robotics in health care.Arne Maibaum, Andreas Bischof, Jannis Hergesell & Benjamin Lipp - 2022 - AI and Society 37 (2):467-477.
    When the social relevance of robotic applications is addressed today, the use of assistive technology in care settings is almost always the first example. So-called care robots are presented as a solution to the nursing crisis, despite doubts about their technological readiness and the lack of concrete usage scenarios in everyday nursing practice. We inquire into this interconnection of social robotics and care. We show how both are made available for each other in three arenas: innovation policy, care organization, and (...)
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  8.  19
    Robots as moral environments.Tomislav Furlanis, Takayuki Kanda & Dražen Brščić - forthcoming - AI and Society:1-19.
    In this philosophical exploration, we investigate the concept of robotic moral environment interaction. The common view understands moral interaction to occur between agents endowed with ethical and interactive capacities. However, recent developments in moral philosophy argue that moral interaction also occurs in relation to the environment. Here conditions and situations of the environment contribute to human moral cognition and the formation of our moral experiences. Based on this philosophical position, we imagine robots interacting as moral environments—a novel conceptualization of human–robot (...)
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  9.  6
    Innovation, risk and control: The true trend is ‘from tool to purpose’—A discussion on the standardization of AI.Oriana Chaves - forthcoming - AI and Society:1-12.
    In this text, our question is what is the current regulatory trend in countries that are not considered central in the development of artificial intelligence, such as Brazil: a preventive approach, or an experimental approach? We will analyze the bills (PL) that are being processed in legislative houses at the state level, and at the federal level, highlighting some elements, such as: Delimitation of the object (conceptualization), fundamental principles, ethical guidelines, relationship with human work, human supervision, and guidelines for public (...)
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  10.  14
    Social robots as partners?Paul Healy - forthcoming - AI and Society:1-8.
    Although social robots are achieving increasing prominence as companions and carers, their status as partners in an interactive relationship with humans remains unclear. The present paper explores this issue, first, by considering why social robots cannot truly qualify as “Thous”, that is, as surrogate human partners, as they are often assumed to be, and then by briefly considering why it will not do to construe them as mere machines, slaves, or pets, as others have contended. Having concluded that none of (...)
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  11.  47
    Learning robots interacting with humans: from epistemic risk to responsibility. [REVIEW]Matteo Santoro, Dante Marino & Guglielmo Tamburrini - 2008 - AI and Society 22 (3):301-314.
    The import of computational learning theories and techniques on the ethics of human-robot interaction is explored in the context of recent developments of personal robotics. An epistemological reflection enables one to isolate a variety of background hypotheses that are needed to achieve successful learning from experience in autonomous personal robots. The conjectural character of these background hypotheses brings out theoretical and practical limitations in our ability to predict and control the behaviour of learning robots in their interactions with humans. Responsibility (...)
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  12.  33
    The mediator role of robot anxiety on the relationship between social anxiety and the attitude toward interaction with robots.Serkan Erebak & Tülay Turgut - 2020 - AI and Society 35 (4):1047-1053.
    Robots that can communicate with people are one of the goals reached by the technology developed for automation in work life. Experts aim to improve the communication skills of these robots further in the near future. Besides, various studies emphasize that people may interact with robots in a similar way as they interact with other people. In line of this idea, this study examines the possible causal chain in which the social anxiety affects the robot anxiety which in turn affects (...)
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  13.  24
    Redefining culture in cultural robotics.Mark L. Ornelas, Gary B. Smith & Masoumeh Mansouri - 2023 - AI and Society 38 (2):777-788.
    Cultural influences are pervasive throughout human behaviour, and as human–robot interactions become more common, roboticists are increasingly focusing attention on how to build robots that are culturally competent and culturally sustainable. The current treatment of culture in robotics, however, is largely limited to the definition of culture as national culture. This is problematic for three reasons: it ignores subcultures, it loses specificity and hides the nuances in cultures, and it excludes refugees and stateless persons. We propose to shift the focus (...)
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  14.  28
    Intelligent service robots for elderly or disabled people and human dignity: legal point of view.Katarzyna Pfeifer-Chomiczewska - 2023 - AI and Society 38 (2):789-800.
    This article aims to present the problem of the impact of artificial intelligence on respect for human dignity in the sphere of care for people who, for various reasons, are described as particularly vulnerable, especially seniors and people with various disabilities. In recent years, various initiatives and works have been undertaken on the European scene to define the directions in which the development and use of artificial intelligence should go. According to the human-centric approach, artificial intelligence should be developed, used (...)
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  15.  47
    Do robots dream of escaping? Narrativity and ethics in Alex Garland’s Ex-Machina and Luke Scott’s Morgan.Inbar Kaminsky - 2021 - AI and Society 36 (1):349-359.
    Ex-Machina and Morgan, two recent science-fiction films that deal with the creation of humanoids, also explored the relationship between artificial intelligence, spatiality and the lingering question mark regarding artificial consciousness. In both narratives, the creators of the humanoids have tried to mimic human consciousness as closely as possible, which has resulted in the imprisonment of the humanoids due to proprietary concerns in Ex-Machina and due to the violent behavior of the humanoid in Morgan. This article addresses the dilemma of whether (...)
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  16.  39
    Could you hate a robot? And does it matter if you could?Helen Ryland - 2021 - AI and Society 36 (2):637-649.
    This article defends two claims. First, humans could be in relationships characterised by hate with some robots. Second, it matters that humans could hate robots, as this hate could wrong the robots (by leaving them at risk of mistreatment, exploitation, etc.). In defending this second claim, I will thus be accepting that morally considerable robots either currently exist, or will exist in the near future, and so it can matter (morally speaking) how we treat these robots. The arguments presented in (...)
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  17.  4
    Integration of a social robot and gamification in adult learning and effects on motivation, engagement and performance.Anna Riedmann, Philipp Schaper & Birgit Lugrin - forthcoming - AI and Society:1-20.
    Learning is a central component of human life and essential for personal development. Therefore, utilizing new technologies in the learning context and exploring their combined potential are considered essential to support self-directed learning in a digital age. A learning environment can be expanded by various technical and content-related aspects. Gamification in the form of elements from video games offers a potential concept to support the learning process. This can be supplemented by technology-supported learning. While the use of tablets is already (...)
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  18.  5
    Robots among us: ordinary but significant human–robot interactions in the city.Jeffrey Kok Hui Chan & Yixiao Wang - forthcoming - AI and Society:1-2.
  19.  43
    Generative AI and human–robot interaction: implications and future agenda for business, society and ethics.Bojan Obrenovic, Xiao Gu, Guoyu Wang, Danijela Godinic & Ilimdorjon Jakhongirov - forthcoming - AI and Society:1-14.
    The revolution of artificial intelligence (AI), particularly generative AI, and its implications for human–robot interaction (HRI) opened up the debate on crucial regulatory, business, societal, and ethical considerations. This paper explores essential issues from the anthropomorphic perspective, examining the complex interplay between humans and AI models in societal and corporate contexts. We provided a comprehensive review of existing literature on HRI, with a special emphasis on the impact of generative models such as ChatGPT. The scientometric study posits that due to (...)
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  20. Ethical robots: the future can heed us. [REVIEW]Selmer Bringsjord - 2008 - AI and Society 22 (4):539-550.
    Bill Joy’s deep pessimism is now famous. Why the Future Doesn’t Need Us, his defense of that pessimism, has been read by, it seems, everyone—and many of these readers, apparently, have been converted to the dark side, or rather more accurately, to the future-is-dark side. Fortunately (for us; unfortunately for Joy), the defense, at least the part of it that pertains to AI and robotics, fails. Ours may be a dark future, but we cannot know that on the basis of (...)
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  21.  59
    Moral control and ownership in AI systems.Raul Gonzalez Fabre, Javier Camacho Ibáñez & Pedro Tejedor Escobar - 2021 - AI and Society 36 (1):289-303.
    AI systems are bringing an augmentation of human capabilities to shape the world. They may also drag a replacement of human conscience in large chunks of life. AI systems can be designed to leave moral control in human hands, to obstruct or diminish that moral control, or even to prevent it, replacing human morality with pre-packaged or developed ‘solutions’ by the ‘intelligent’ machine itself. Artificial Intelligent systems (AIS) are increasingly being used in multiple applications and receiving more attention from the (...)
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  22.  25
    Safety by simulation: theorizing the future of robot regulation.Mika Viljanen - 2024 - AI and Society 39 (1):139-154.
    Mobility robots may soon be among us, triggering a need for safety regulation. Robot safety regulation, however, remains underexplored, with only a few articles analyzing what regulatory approaches could be feasible. This article offers an account of the available regulatory strategies and attempts to theorize the effects of simulation-based safety regulation. The article first discusses the distinctive features of mobility robots as regulatory targets and argues that emergent behavior constitutes the key regulatory concern in designing robot safety regulation regimes. In (...)
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  23.  45
    Empathic responses and moral status for social robots: an argument in favor of robot patienthood based on K. E. Løgstrup.Simon N. Balle - 2022 - AI and Society 37 (2):535-548.
    Empirical research on human–robot interaction has demonstrated how humans tend to react to social robots with empathic responses and moral behavior. How should we ethically evaluate such responses to robots? Are people wrong to treat non-sentient artefacts as moral patients since this rests on anthropomorphism and ‘over-identification’ —or correct since spontaneous moral intuition and behavior toward nonhumans is indicative for moral patienthood, such that social robots become our ‘Others’?. In this research paper, I weave extant HRI studies that demonstrate empathic (...)
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  24.  17
    Attitudes toward the use of humanoid robots in healthcare—a cross-sectional study.Malin Andtfolk, Linda Nyholm, Hilde Eide, Auvo Rauhala & Lisbeth Fagerström - 2022 - AI and Society 37 (4):1739-1748.
    The use of robotic technology in healthcare is increasing. The aim was to explore attitudes toward the use of humanoid robots in healthcare among patients, relatives, care professionals, school actors and other relevant actors in healthcare and to analyze the associations between participants’ background variables and attitudes. The data were collected through a cross-sectional survey (N = 264) in 2018 where participants met a humanoid robot. The survey was comprised of background variables and items from a modified Robot Attitude Scale. (...)
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  25.  14
    Dancing with robots: acceptability of humanoid companions to reduce loneliness during COVID-19 (and beyond).Guy Moshe Ross - forthcoming - AI and Society:1-12.
    The purpose of this research is to explore the acceptance of social robots as companions. Understanding what affects the acceptance of humanoid companions may give society tools that will help people overcome loneliness throughout pandemics, such as COVID-19 and beyond. Based on regulatory focus theory, it is proposed that there is a relationship between goal-directed motivation and acceptance of robots as companions. The theory of regulatory focus posits that goal-directed behavior is regulated by two motivational systems—promotion and prevention. People with (...)
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  26.  34
    Disengagement with ethics in robotics as a tacit form of dehumanisation.Karolina Zawieska - 2020 - AI and Society 35 (4):869-883.
    Over the past two decades, ethical challenges related to robotics technologies have gained increasing interest among different research and non-academic communities, in particular through the field of roboethics. While the reasons to address roboethics are clear, why not to engage with ethics needs to be better understood. This paper focuses on a limited or lacking engagement with ethics that takes place within some parts of the robotics community and its implications for the conceptualisation of the human being. The underlying assumption (...)
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  27. The role of robotics and AI in technologically mediated human evolution: a constructive proposal.Jeffrey White - 2020 - AI and Society 35 (1):177-185.
    This paper proposes that existing computational modeling research programs may be combined into platforms for the information of public policy. The main idea is that computational models at select levels of organization may be integrated in natural terms describing biological cognition, thereby normalizing a platform for predictive simulations able to account for both human and environmental costs associated with different action plans and institutional arrangements over short and long time spans while minimizing computational requirements. Building from established research programs, the (...)
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  28. On the moral status of social robots: considering the consciousness criterion.Kestutis Mosakas - 2021 - AI and Society 36 (2):429-443.
    While philosophers have been debating for decades on whether different entities—including severely disabled human beings, embryos, animals, objects of nature, and even works of art—can legitimately be considered as having moral status, this question has gained a new dimension in the wake of artificial intelligence (AI). One of the more imminent concerns in the context of AI is that of the moral rights and status of social robots, such as robotic caregivers and artificial companions, that are built to interact with (...)
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  29.  15
    How to dance, robot?Eric Mullis - forthcoming - AI and Society:1-8.
    Informed by scholarship in dance studies, this essay examines the popular phenomenon of the dancing robot. It begins with an analysis of social robotics experiments that use techniques of contemporary experimental theater to frame human–robot interactions. With elements of theater history in mind, it becomes evident that such experimental designs fruitfully destabilize common understandings of social robots, theatrical performance, and dance movement. This sets up a discussion of a co-creative approach to developing robot choreography which utilizes compositional techniques from experimental (...)
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  30.  15
    Recipient design in human–robot interaction: the emergent assessment of a robot’s competence.Sylvaine Tuncer, Christian Licoppe, Paul Luff & Christian Heath - forthcoming - AI and Society:1-16.
    People meeting a robot for the first time do not know what it is capable of and therefore how to interact with it—what actions to produce, and how to produce them. Despite social robotics’ long-standing interest in the effects of robots’ appearance and conduct on users, and efforts to identify factors likely to improve human–robot interaction, little attention has been paid to how participants evaluate their robotic partner in the unfolding of actual interactions. This paper draws from qualitative analyses of (...)
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  31.  39
    “I Am Not Your Robot:” the metaphysical challenge of humanity’s AIS ownership.Tyler L. Jaynes - 2021 - AI and Society 37 (4):1689-1702.
    Despite the reality that self-learning artificial intelligence systems (SLAIS) are gaining in sophistication, humanity’s focus regarding SLAIS-human interactions are unnervingly centred upon transnational commercial sectors and, most generally, around issues of intellectual property law. But as SLAIS gain greater environmental interaction capabilities in digital spaces, or the ability to self-author code to drive their development as algorithmic models, a concern arises as to whether a system that displays a “deceptive” level of human-like engagement with users in our physical world ought (...)
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  32.  7
    Trust and robotics: a multi-staged decision-making approach to robots in community.Wenxi Zhang, Willow Wong & Mark Findlay - forthcoming - AI and Society:1-16.
    With the desired outcome of social good within the wider robotics ecosystem, trust is identified as the central adhesive of the human–robot interaction (HRI) interface. However, building trust between humans and robots involves more than improving the machine’s technical reliability or trustworthiness in function. This paper presents a holistic, community-based approach to trust-building, where trust is understood as a multifaceted and multi-staged looped relation that depends heavily on context and human perceptions. Building on past literature that identifies dispositional and learned (...)
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  33.  27
    Moving beyond the mirror: relational and performative meaning making in human–robot communication.Petra Gemeinboeck & Rob Saunders - 2022 - AI and Society 37 (2):549-563.
    Current research in human–robot interaction often focuses on rendering communication between humans and robots more ‘natural’ by designing machines that appear and behave humanlike. Communication, in this human-centric approach, is often understood as a process of successfully transmitting information in the form of predefined messages and gestures. This article introduces an alternative arts-led, movement-centric approach, which embraces the differences of machinelike robotic artefacts and, instead, investigates how meaning is dynamically enacted in the encounter of humans and machines. Our design approach (...)
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  34.  18
    Caring in the in-between: a proposal to introduce responsible AI and robotics to healthcare.Núria Vallès-Peris & Miquel Domènech - 2023 - AI and Society 38 (4):1685-1695.
    In the scenario of growing polarization of promises and dangers that surround artificial intelligence (AI), how to introduce responsible AI and robotics in healthcare? In this paper, we develop an ethical–political approach to introduce democratic mechanisms to technological development, what we call “Caring in the In-Between”. Focusing on the multiple possibilities for action that emerge in the realm of uncertainty, we propose an ethical and responsible framework focused on care actions in between fears and hopes. Using the theoretical perspective of (...)
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  35.  25
    Rules for privately owned robots in public spaces.Seng W. Loke - forthcoming - AI and Society:1-2.
  36.  31
    Caring in the in-between: a proposal to introduce responsible AI and robotics to healthcare.Núria Vallès-Peris & Miquel Domènech - 2021 - AI and Society:1-11.
    In the scenario of growing polarization of promises and dangers that surround artificial intelligence (AI), how to introduce responsible AI and robotics in healthcare? In this paper, we develop an ethical–political approach to introduce democratic mechanisms to technological development, what we call “Caring in the In-Between”. Focusing on the multiple possibilities for action that emerge in the realm of uncertainty, we propose an ethical and responsible framework focused on care actions in between fears and hopes. Using the theoretical perspective of (...)
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  37.  24
    On the moral permissibility of robot apologies.Makoto Kureha - forthcoming - AI and Society:1-11.
    Robots that incorporate the function of apologizing have emerged in recent years. This paper examines the moral permissibility of making robots apologize. First, I characterize the nature of apology based on analyses conducted in multiple scholarly domains. Next, I present a prima facie argument that robot apologies are not permissible because they may harm human societies by inducing the misattribution of responsibility. Subsequently, I respond to a possible response to the prima facie objection based on the interpretation that attributing responsibility (...)
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  38.  33
    Collaborative route map and navigation of the guide dog robot based on optimum energy consumption.Bin Hong, Yihang Guo, Meimei Chen, Yahui Nie, Changyuan Feng & Fugeng Li - forthcoming - AI and Society:1-7.
    The guide dog robot (GDR) is a low-speed companion robot that serves visually impaired people and is used to guide blind people to walk steadily, carrying a variety of intelligent technologies and needing to have the ability to guide with optimal energy consumption in specific scenarios. This paper proposes an innovative technique for virtual-real collaborative path planning and navigation of the GDR specific indoor scenarios, and designs an experimental method for virtual-real collaborative path planning of the GDR specific scenarios. The (...)
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  39.  11
    Correction to: Robots as moral environments.Tomislav Furlanis, Takayuki Kanda & Dražen Brščić - forthcoming - AI and Society:1-1.
  40.  36
    Tying the knot with a robot: legal and philosophical foundations for human–artificial intelligence matrimony.Greg Yanke - 2021 - AI and Society 36 (2):417-427.
    Technological progress may eventually produce sophisticated robots with human-like traits that result in humans forming meaningful relationships with them. Such relationships would likely lead to a demand for human–artificial intelligence matrimony. U.S. Supreme Court decisions that expanded the definition of marriage to include interracial and same-sex couples, as well as those that have not extended marriage to polygamous relationships, provide guidance regarding the criteria that human–AI would have to meet to successfully assert a right to marry. Ultimately, robots will have (...)
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  41.  18
    When stigmatization does not work: over-securitization in efforts of the Campaign to Stop Killer Robots.Anzhelika Solovyeva & Nik Hynek - 2023 - AI and Society 38 (6):2547-2569.
    This article reflects on securitization efforts with respect to ‘killer robots’, known more impartially as autonomous weapons systems (AWS). Our contribution focuses, theoretically and empirically, on the Campaign to Stop Killer Robots, a transnational advocacy network vigorously pushing for a pre-emptive ban on AWS. Marking exactly a decade of its activity, there is still no international regime formally banning, or even purposefully regulating, AWS. Our objective is to understand why the Campaign has not been able to advance its disarmament agenda (...)
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  42.  47
    Bringing older people’s perspectives on consumer socially assistive robots into debates about the future of privacy protection and AI governance.Andrea Slane & Isabel Pedersen - forthcoming - AI and Society:1-20.
    A growing number of consumer technology companies are aiming to convince older people that humanoid robots make helpful tools to support aging-in-place. As hybrid devices, socially assistive robots (SARs) are situated between health monitoring tools, familiar digital assistants, security aids, and more advanced AI-powered devices. Consequently, they implicate older people’s privacy in complex ways. Such devices are marketed to perform functions common to smart speakers (e.g., Amazon Echo) and smart home platforms (e.g., Google Home), while other functions are more specific (...)
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  43.  16
    Beyond the hype: ‘acceptable futures’ for AI and robotic technologies in healthcare.Giulia De Togni, S. Erikainen, S. Chan & S. Cunningham-Burley - forthcoming - AI and Society:1-10.
    AI and robotic technologies attract much hype, including utopian and dystopian future visions of technologically driven provision in the health and care sectors. Based on 30 interviews with scientists, clinicians and other stakeholders in the UK, Europe, USA, Australia, and New Zealand, this paper interrogates how those engaged in developing and using AI and robotic applications in health and care characterize their future promise, potential and challenges. We explore the ways in which these professionals articulate and navigate a range of (...)
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  44.  14
    Artificial intelligence, public control, and supply of a vital commodity like COVID-19 vaccine.Vladimir Tsyganov - 2023 - AI and Society 38 (6):2619-2628.
    The article examines the problem of ensuring the political stability of a democratic social system with a shortage of a vital commodity (like vaccine against COVID-19). In such a system, members of society citizens assess the authorities. Thus, actions by the authorities to increase the supply of this commodity can contribute to citizens' approval and hence political stability. However, this supply is influenced by random factors, the actions of competitors, etc. Therefore, citizens do not have sufficient information about all the (...)
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  45.  26
    Why being dialogical must come before being logical: the need for a hermeneutical–dialogical approach to robotic activities.John Shotter - 2019 - AI and Society 34 (1):29-35.
    Currently, our official rationality is still of a Cartesian kind; we are still embedded in a mechanistic order that takes it that separate, countable entities (spatial forms), related logically to each other, are the only ‘things’ that matter to us—an order clearly suited to advances in robotics. Unfortunately, it is an order that renders invisible ‘relational things’, non-objective things that exist in time, in the transitions from one state of affairs to another, things that ‘point’ toward possibilities in the future, (...)
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  46.  32
    Could the destruction of a beloved robot be considered a hate crime? An exploration of the legal and social significance of robot love.Paula Sweeney - forthcoming - AI and Society:1-7.
    In the future, it is likely that we will form strong bonds of attachment and even develop love for social robots. Some of these loving relations will be, from the human’s perspective, as significant as a loving relationship that they might have had with another human. This means that, from the perspective of the loving human, the mindless destruction of their robot partner could be as devastating as the murder of another’s human partner. Yet, the loving partner of a robot (...)
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  47.  26
    From the ethics of technology towards an ethics of knowledge policy: implications for robotics.René von Schomberg - 2008 - AI and Society 22 (3):331-348.
    My analysis takes as its point of departure the controversial assumption that contemporary ethical theories cannot capture adequately the ethical and social challenges of scientific and technological development. This assumption is rooted in the argument that classical ethical theory invariably addresses the issue of ethical responsibility in terms of whether and how intentional actions of individuals can be justified. Scientific and technological developments, however, have produced unintentional consequences and side-consequences. These consequences very often result from collective decisions concerning the way (...)
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  48.  9
    Coverage of well-being within artificial intelligence, machine learning and robotics academic literature: the case of disabled people.Aspen Lillywhite & Gregor Wolbring - forthcoming - AI and Society:1-19.
    Well-being is an important policy concept including in discussions around the use of artificial intelligence, machine learning and robotics. Disabled people experience challenges in their well-being. Therefore, the aim of our scoping review study of academic abstracts employing Scopus, IEEE Xplore, Compendex and the 70 databases from EBSCO-HOST as sources was to better understand how academic literature focusing on AI/ML/robotics engages with well-being in relation to disabled people. Our objective was to answer the following research question: how and to what (...)
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  49.  12
    Differences in stakeholders’ expectations of gendered robots in the field of psychotherapy: an exploratory survey.Tatsuya Nomura, Tomohiro Suzuki & Hirokazu Kumazaki - forthcoming - AI and Society:1-12.
    In the present study, qualitative and quantitative studies were conducted to explore differences between stakeholders in expectations of gendered robots, with a focus on their specific application in the field of psychotherapy. In Study I, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 18 experts in psychotherapy to extract categories of opinions regarding the use of humanoid robots in the field. Based on these extracted categories, in Study II, an online questionnaire survey was conducted to compare concrete expectations of the use of humanoid (...)
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  50.  18
    Challenges in enabling user control over algorithm-based services.Pascal D. König - 2024 - AI and Society 39 (1):195-205.
    Algorithmic systems that provide services to people by supporting or replacing human decision-making promise greater convenience in various areas. The opacity of these applications, however, means that it is not clear how much they truly serve their users. A promising way to address the issue of possible undesired biases consists in giving users control by letting them configure a system and aligning its performance with users’ own preferences. However, as the present paper argues, this form of control over an algorithmic (...)
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