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  1.  95
    Red in Tooth and Claw No More: Animal Rights and the Permissibility to Redesign Nature.Connor K. Kianpour & Eze Paez - 2022 - Environmental Values 31 (2):211-231.
    Most non-human animals live in the wild and it is probable that suffering predominates in their lives due to natural events. Humans may at some point be able to engage in paradise engineering, or the modification of nature and animal organisms themselves, to improve the well-being of wild animals. We may, in other words, make nature 'red in tooth and claw' no more. We argue that this creates a tension between environmental ethics and animal ethics which is likely insurmountable. First, (...)
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  2.  21
    It Only Affects Me: Pharmaceutical Regulation and Harm to Others.Connor K. Kianpour - 2022 - HEC Forum 34 (3):269-289.
    In her Pharmaceutical Freedom, Jessica Flanigan argues that antibiotics can be regulated consistent with her otherwise largely deregulatory view with respect to pharmaceuticals and recreational drugs. I contend in this essay that the reasons for justifying antibiotic regulation are reasons that can be offered to justify the regulation of many other drugs, both pharmaceutical and recreational. After laying out the specifics of Flanigan’s view, I suggest that it is amenable to the regulation of drugs like varenicline. Though such drugs can (...)
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  3.  68
    Strong Comic Immoralism.Connor K. Kianpour - 2023 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 81 (3):363-377.
    Strong comic immoralism maintains that every time a humorous demonstration (for example, a joke) involves a moral defect, it is enhanced aesthetically in virtue of having this moral defect. I want to show that strong comic immoralism is a coherent position, that it is possible to defend, and that there is, in fact, some reason to defend it. By doing this, my hope is that, moving forward, those who are interested in questions about the relationship between immorality and the aesthetic (...)
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  4.  69
    The Minority Retort: in Defense of Defection in Marginalized Groups.Connor K. Kianpour - 2022 - Public Affairs Quarterly 36 (4):280-311.
    The defection thesis holds that members of marginalized social groups are obligated not to express views important to others in the group that are regarded by the others as substantively wrong. In this essay, I evaluate arguments that seek to vindicate the defection thesis and conclude they all fail. Then, I argue that we have reason to believe sanctioning defectors in certain ways is wrongful and that the expression of their contentious ideas is good for members of marginalized groups. We (...)
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  5.  13
    The Kids Aren't Alright.Connor K. Kianpour - 2023 - Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy 25 (3).
    I first argue that forms of regulated parenting are presumptively justified whereas private parenting is not. Then, I argue that the reasons we have to believe that regulated parenting is justified give us reasons to believe that individuals who are objectionably intolerant—that is, they subscribe to prejudicial dogmas such as racism, sexism, and homophobia to such an extent that their ability to direct caring attitudes toward, for example, Black people, women, and/or gay people is significantly impaired—ought not to rear children. (...)
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  6.  12
    The political speech rights of the tokenized.Connor K. Kianpour - forthcoming - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy.
    It is important for members of marginalized groups to express political views relevant to how members of their respective groups should be treated. Recently, however, it has been argued that there are some contexts––that is, contexts in which members of marginalized groups are tokenized and have considerable power to influence political outcomes that would affect their other group members––in which certain marginalized group members ought not express certain political views relevant to how members of their respective groups should be treated. (...)
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