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Colin Higgins [19]Colin P. Higgins [1]
  1.  55
    Business and Society Research in Times of the Corona Crisis.Andrew Spicer, Kathleen Rehbein, Colin Higgins, Jill A. Brown, Frank G. A. de Bakker & Hari Bapuji - 2020 - Business and Society 59 (6):1067-1078.
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  2.  30
    More Than an Umbrella Construct: We Can (and Should) Do Better With CSR by Theorizing Through Context.Hari Bapuji, Frank G. A. de Bakker, Colin Higgins, Kathleen Rehbein, Andrew Spicer & Jill A. Brown - 2022 - Business and Society 61 (8):1965-1976.
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  3.  30
    Building on Its Past: The Future of Business and Society Scholarship.Andrew Spicer, Kathleen Rehbein, Colin Higgins, Hari Bapuji, Frank G. A. de Bakker & Jill A. Brown - 2022 - Business and Society 61 (5):967-979.
    This Special Issue commemorates the 60th anniversary of Business & Society with nine rigorous literature reviews that address important societal problems and provide opportunities for theory development in the business and society field; in this introduction we present an overview of the Special Issue. With the theme “Building on Its Past,” the nine articles address a host of contemporary issues, including climate change, wicked problems, business and human rights, human health, certifications standards, the governance of artificial intelligence, stakeholder engagement, stakeholder (...)
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  4.  15
    Is Sustainability Reporting Becoming Institutionalised? The Role of an Issues-Based Field.Colin Higgins, Wendy Stubbs & Markus Milne - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 147 (2):309-326.
    We study companies that do not produce a sustainability report in contexts where institutionalisation is assumed. Based on a careful analysis of interaction patterns between non-reporting companies, sustainability interest groups, and peer organisations, we find patterns of discursive and material isomorphism that suggest sustainability reporting is confined to an issues-based field, rather than spreading as an institutionalised practice across the business community. We argue that the issues-based field exerts only weak pressure for sustainability reporting, and that encouraging more firms to (...)
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  5.  12
    Something Old, Something New: Continuity and Change at Business & Society.Andrew Spicer, Kathleen Rehbein, Colin Higgins, Frank G. A. de Bakker, Jill A. Brown & Hari Bapuji - 2020 - Business and Society 59 (5):791-798.
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  6.  18
    The Uptake of Sustainability Reporting in Australia.Colin Higgins, Markus J. Milne & Bernadine van Gramberg - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 129 (2):445-468.
    In this paper, we identify and discuss how sustainability reporting has spread throughout the Australian business community over the past twenty years or so. We identified all Australian business organisations that have produced a sustainability report since 1995, and we undertook an interview survey with managers of reporting companies. By incorporating a wide range and large number of reporting companies, we offer insights beyond those obtained from traditional report content analysis and from close analyses of singular case-study organisations. We reveal (...)
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  7.  19
    Stakeholders’ Perspectives on the Role of Regulatory Reform in Integrated Reporting.Wendy Stubbs & Colin Higgins - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 147 (3):489-508.
    This paper reports on an exploratory study of the preferences of users of non-financial reporting for regulatory or voluntary approaches to integrated reporting. While it is well known that companies prefer voluntary approaches to non-financial reporting, considerably less is known about the preferences of the users of non-financial information. IR is the latest development in attempts over 30 or more years to broaden organisational non-financial reporting and accountability to include the wider social and environmental impacts of business. It promises to (...)
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  8.  10
    Conceptualizing, Theorizing, and Measuring the Contributions of Business to Refugee Crises.Iii Harry J. Van Buren, Charlotte Karam, Alexander Newman & Colin Higgins - 2024 - Business and Society 63 (1):3-17.
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  9.  24
    Business and Society Scholarship: Fit to be Institutionalized?Colin Higgins & Tyler Wry - 2007 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 18:149-150.
    This short paper introduces institutional theory to some long-standing questions about business and society theory. Specifically, institutional theory would seem to offer some potential for understanding why business organisations may adopt CSR practices for non-instrumental reasons.
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  10.  30
    Constructing the Legitimate, Responsible Corporation: A Rhetorical Analysis.Colin Higgins & Robyn Walker - 2008 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 19:217-228.
    This paper utilises rhetorical analysis to explore how persuasive appeals in company social/environmental reports shape understandings about corporate responsibility.
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  11.  7
    Leadership for Inclusion and Impact: A Renewed Vision for Business & Society.Colin Higgins & Hari Bapuji - 2023 - Business and Society 62 (1):3-8.
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  12.  20
    Profits and Principles.Colin P. Higgins - 2005 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 16:130-135.
    Fairclough’s (1992) model of critical discourse analysis can be used to show how corporate social responsibility, stakeholder identity and the social relations between organisations and stakeholders are socially constructed in the social and environmental reports prepared by companies. An example from doctoral work-in-progress is provided. Preliminary findings suggest the Royal Dutch/Shell Group of Companies construct corporate social responsibility as functionalist and economically-based. Stakeholders, rather than equal partners, are pacified and persuaded to Shell’s understandings about corporate social responsibility.
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  13.  23
    Passing the Ethical Litmus Test.Colin Higgins, Paul Lieber & Patti Poole - 2006 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 17:15-17.
    This short paper provides preliminary findings into the level of moral development and ethical decision-making patterns of public relations practitioners inAustralia and New Zealand. Our findings suggest that most PR practitioners rely on their own sense of right or wrong when addressing ethical dilemmas. However, these practitioners also only exhibit very low levels of concern for Kohlberg’s postconventional stages of moral reasoning.
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  14.  35
    Understanding Dynamism and Flux in the Ideological Struggle for CSR.Colin Higgins & Ben Neville - 2010 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 21:57-66.
    A largely ignored area of Business & Society scholarship is the role of political ideology in driving the norms and attitudes of business people and stakeholders toward corporate social responsibility (CSR). It seems intuitive that individuals with a more leftwing ideology would support regulation of, and responsibilities, for business (eg a stakeholder view) and those of a more right-wing persuasion would support more economic freedom (eg a shareholder view), but these relationships are unclear. Little is understood about how ideology influences (...)
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  15.  23
    What Can Critical Theory Contribute to Business & Society?Colin Higgins - 2006 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 17:109-111.
    This short paper is designed to stimulate thinking about the broader philosophical and theoretical questions that sit behind our work in the ‘Business &Society’ area. It is not a fully developed paper, and was pitched as a discussion paper at the Merida conference. It currently stands as a collection of broad and preliminary thoughts about the potential for cross-fertilisation between those interested in critical theory and those researching ‘Business and Society.’ As such, many of the ideas and thoughts are not (...)
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  16.  9
    Corporate Philanthropy.Tyron Love & Colin Higgins - 2006 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 17:118-120.
    This paper outlines issues of corporate philanthropy research. Of significant value is that normative prescriptions and non-empirical conceptual models lack thesupport of rigorous empirical research. Moreover, dominant methodological approaches embedded in the positivist tradition lack the depth required inunderstanding managerial involvement in corporate philanthropic programmes. Accordingly, this paper argues for new methodological insights. The research agenda should question the capitalistic nature of corporations, delve deep into management thought and recognise the affect of corporate philanthropy on multiple corporate stakeholders.
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  17.  12
    Sixty and Strong.Andrew Spicer, Kathleen Rehbein, Colin Higgins, Jill A. Brown, Hari Bapuji & Frank G. A. de Bakker - 2021 - Business and Society 60 (1):3-6.
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