21 found
Order:
  1.  13
    Aristotle and Business: An Inescapable Tension.Colin D. Pearce - 2013 - In Christopher Luetege (ed.), Handbook of the Philosophical Foundations of Business Ethics. Springer. pp. 23--43.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  2.  8
    A golden crown to gain: The machiavellianism of Kipling's 'the man who would be King'.Colin D. Pearce - unknown
    This paper discusses Rudyard Kipling's famous story 'The Man Who Would Be King' in terms of the leitmotif of Machiavellian political philosophy that is to be discerned in the unfolding of the story. Kipling introduces us to the twin founders of the new order in Kafiristan in the same way that Machiavelli dedicates his 'Discourses' to two young nobles. He then proceeds to describe how they acquired their new kingdom and then how they lost it. On closer examination it becomes (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  15
    A note on the Dewey-Lippmann debate.Colin D. Pearce - unknown
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  11
    Aristocratic writers and new continents: Lawrence and tocqueville on democracy.Colin D. Pearce - unknown
    This short essay attempts to bring D.H. Lawrence and Alexis de Tocqueville into the same field of vision via a comparative assessment of the former's 1922 novel entitled 'Kangaroo' and the latter's classic study of the politics of the New World, 'Democracy in America.' It argues that as 'Good Europeans' the two writers were seeking both to learn from, as well as to teach about the meaning of modern civilization's transition to Democracy via the example provided by a specific national (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  12
    C.s. Lewis, democracy and modern relativism.Colin D. Pearce - unknown
    This short essay enters in the "Objectivism/Relativism" debate via the opposed vantage points of C.S. Lewis and Friedrich Nietzsche respectively. It highlights this opposition in terms of Lewis's identification of relativism with democracy and Nietzsche's association of it with aristocracy. Lewis connects the intellectual tendencies of democracy with hostility to tradition and virtue, both western and non-western, and therewith to the idea that moral values are "relative" and are ultimately rooted in individual and cultural preferences. Nietzsche on the other hand (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  10
    Friendship and freedom of soul in Lawrence's kangaroo.Colin D. Pearce - unknown
    This essay analyzes the relationship between Richard Lovat Summers and Ben Cooley in D.H. Lawrence's 1922 novel "Kangaroo." It argues that the psychological dynamic of the relationship between the two men as presented by Lawrence reveals one of the deepest of human paradoxes - the simultaneous kinship and opposition at work in the bipolarity of philosophy and tyranny, individual independence and unconditional love, the quest for glory and for ultimate truth, and the demands of self-love and of love of mankind. (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  14
    Future Technoscientific Education: Atheism and Ethics in a Globalizing World.Colin D. Pearce - 2011 - Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society 31 (2):81-102.
    This article attempts to assess the claim that the unum necessarium in our time is the general dissemination of scientific knowledge because liberal civilization or the “good society” cannot be had in the presence of traditional religion and “metaphysics.” The paper attempts to place this claim in the context of continuing globalization and related questions such as 9/11, Fundamentalist Islam, Sino-Western relations, “pop” atheism and the prospect of a “post-human” future. The paper describes the continuance of pre-Enlightenment traditions and beliefs (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  27
    History for Life: Simms and Nietzsche Compared.Colin D. Pearce - 2007 - Humanitas 20 (1-2):64-85.
  9.  14
    Hawthorne's 'my kinsman, major molineux'.Colin D. Pearce - unknown
    This essay provides an interpretation of Nathaniel Hawthorne's short story 'My Kinsman, Major Molineux.' It argues that in this story Hawthorne is presenting a tale of social transformation from the pre-modern to the modern society in the form of the protagonist Robin's experiences on coming from the backwoods to the city. Here Robin sees things he has never seen before and is transformed in terms of his religious attitudes as well as in terms of his simple individual,rural independence. Robin ends (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  17
    Lord Brougham's Neo-Paganism.Colin D. Pearce - 1994 - Journal of the History of Ideas 55 (4):651-670.
  11.  5
    Liberal education in America: Civic training and philosophic knowledge in the thought of Edward Everett Hale and James Mccosh.Colin D. Pearce - unknown
    In an address entitled "Democracy and Liberal Education" delivered in 1887, Edward Everett Hale attacked the then President of Princeton University, the distinguished Scottish philosopher James McCosh for his remarks in a lecture to the Exeter Academy. Hale argued, in effect, that McCosh was ultimately "un-American" in his pedagogical purposes. The issues which Hale goes on to address, and the arguments to which he gives vent, show clearly the battle lines as far as liberal education in America was concerned. Hale (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12.  11
    'My dear sir': Holmes to Simms on the present state of letters.Colin D. Pearce - unknown
    The focus of this paper is the correspondence between George Frederick Holmes and William Gilmore Simms. These two outstanding individuals had one of the more memorable friendships and collaborations in the intellectual history of the South. Holmes was a literary journalist, critic, essayist, commentator, appraiser, analyst, moralist and reviewer whose output in these forms over a long career was prodigious. He was as an outstanding contributor to various journals and periodicals, some of which were edited by Simms and within which (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13.  6
    Napoleonic ambition versus Jeffersonian virtue: The case of Lewis Rand.Colin D. Pearce - unknown
    This paper undertakes to give a reading of Mary Johnston's 1908 historical novel entitled Lewis Rand. The novel tells the story of a young Virginia man who receives a Jeffersonian education - literally - Lewis Rand is educated by Thomas Jefferson "in person." The young man later breaks with the great man over the character of his own political ambition and the limits which would be put upon this ambition if he were to continue in his adherence to Jeffersonian principles. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14.  9
    President Hayes - nihilist?Colin D. Pearce - unknown
    This short essay connects President Rutherford B. Hayes (1822 - 1893) with the thought of Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803 - 1882). It shows that President Hayes was an avid reader of Emerson and that he thought in Emersonian terms when he considered political questions. In private letters Hayes was wont to describe himself with the unusual term 'nihilist.' His use of this appellation has to be understood in the context of the times. What he meant was that he had been (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15.  10
    The aristotelianism of George Frederick Holmes.Colin D. Pearce - unknown
    In this paper I would like to establish the priority of Aristotle in the thought of George Frederick Holmes (1820-1897), the South's leading philosopher of the nineteenth century. Accompanying this aim is the possibility of an improved understanding of the historical "Mind of the South" and its particular orientation to the ongoing rise of modern civilization. Holmes copiously presented a firmly articulated "metaphysics" in a myriad of articles over a period stretching from the early 1840's until the end of the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16.  6
    The Broughamian philosophy of enlightenment and its critics.Colin D. Pearce - unknown
    Henry Lord Brougham (1778-1868) belongs with Thomas Jefferson and Horace Mann in the United States and Egerton Ryerson in Canada as one of the great promoters and founders of public education in the English-speaking world. His most famous phrase is The schoolmaster is abroad and this quote symbolizes his belief that the fate of the modern, liberal society depends on free access to education for the population at large. It is not that Brougham any more than Jefferson failed to draw (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17.  15
    Two metaphysicians: D.h. Lawrence and Martin Heidegger compared.Colin D. Pearce - unknown
    This paper will proceed from the assumption of scholars like Anne Fernihough, Peter Fjagsund, Michael Black, and Michael Bell that there are sufficient connecting links between the literary oeuvre of D.H. Lawrence and the philosophizing of Martin Heidegger that they warrant consideration in each other's company. The paper will attempt to provide more evidence for what these scholars have been contending. It seeks to make the case that although D.H. Lawrence and Martin Heidegger start from very different beginning points, the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18.  16
    The mind of the master class: History and faith in the southern slaveholders' worldview.Colin D. Pearce - unknown
    This is a 3,000 word review of Elizabeth Fox-Genovese and Eugene D. Genovese's monumental study of the intellectual life of the ante-bellum South entitled "The Mind of the Master Class: History and Faith in the Southern Slaveholders' Worldview "(Cambridge University Press, 2005) While acknowledging the book as an outstanding achievement in terms of the sheer comprehensiveness of its scope and the breadth of its coverage of southern intellectual culture it concludes that the authors' pre-existing methodological assumptions imposed severe limitations on (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19.  8
    The path to post-modernity, or, 'god is dead and we did it for the kids!'.Colin D. Pearce - unknown
    This paper attempts to present a 'time line' of the increasing levels of doubt and anxiety about the path of 'Progressive Civilization' from the heyday of Victorian liberalism in the early 19th Century to the rise of postmodernism in our day. It does so by tracking a line of thought through John Stuart Mill, Lord Bryce, Matthew Arnold, Henry Adams, Friedrich Nietzsche, Martin Heidegger and Walter Lippmann. It uses the quip coined by the Yippie leader Abbie Hoffmann in the 1960's (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20.  11
    The rambler as rotarian: H.l. Mencken's Samuel Johnson.Colin D. Pearce - unknown
    This short essay takes stock of H.L. Mencken's portrayal of Samuel Johnson as the "first Rotarian" and as nothing more than a mouthpiece for the prejudices and defender of the authorities of his time. I suggest by contrast that Johnson was fully appreciative of the need for the writer to be at a distance from the prejudices of his age and that rather than a mind blinkered by deep national prejudices Johnson was in fact a "Good European" as cosmopolitan in (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21.  8
    Book review, Andreas Kalyvas and Ira Katznelson, liberal beginnings: Making a republic for the moderns. [REVIEW]Colin D. Pearce - unknown
    This book review considers Andreas Kalyvas and Ira Katznelson's argument that there is less of an intrinsic tension between liberalism and republicanism than has been claimed by various students of the history of modern liberal thought. It fully endorses the authors' directing of our attention to the mode of thinking which is to be seen in their select group of subjects (Adam Smith, Adam Ferguson, James Madison, Thomas Paine, Germaine de Stael and Benjamin Constant). But it balks at their claim (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark