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  1.  12
    Disambiguating “Mechanisms” in Pharmacy: Lessons From Mechanist Philosophy of Science.Ahmad Yaman Abdin, Claus Jacob & Lena Kästner - 2020 - International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17 (6).
    Talk of mechanisms is ubiquitous in the natural sciences. Interdisciplinary fields such as biochemistry and pharmacy frequently discuss mechanisms with the assistance of diagrams. Such diagrams usually depict entities as structures or boxes and activities or interactions as arrows. While some of these arrows may indicate causal or componential relations, others may represent temporal or operational orders. Importantly, what kind of relation an arrow represents may not only vary with context but also be underdetermined by empirical data. In this manuscript, (...)
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  2. Some Remarks on Chemical Arguments.Claus Jacob - 2004 - Studia Philosophica 4:37.
     
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  3.  56
    The Closure of the Department of Chemistry at the University of Exeter – An Insider’s View.Claus Jacob - 2007 - Foundations of Chemistry 9 (1):57-64.
  4.  36
    Philosophy and Biochemistry: Research at the Interface Between Chemistry and Biology. [REVIEW]Claus Jacob - 2002 - Foundations of Chemistry 4 (2):97-125.
    This paper investigates the interface between philosophy and biochemistry. While it is problematic to justify the application of a particular philosophical model to biochemistry, it seems to be even more difficult to develop a special “Philosophy for Biochemistry”. Alternatively, philosophy can be used in biochemistry based on an alternative approach that involves an interdependent iteration process at a philosophical and (bio)chemical level (“Exeter Method”). This useful iteration method supplements more abstract approaches at the interface between philosophy and natural sciences, and (...)
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