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  1.  13
    Aristotle’s Democratic Polis: Explanation or Warning?Christopher Vasillopulos - 2015 - Dialogue and Universalism 25 (1):203-210.
    A democratic polis requires a citizenry that is capable of choice, that is, a decision informed by reason and facts. Tyranny requires obedient subjects. Democratic citizens normally pursue happiness, a life of virtuous activity, a way of living that requires family and friendship. Periclean Athens demonstrates the perils of democracy when the polis assumes the prerogatives of the family and friendship, substituting patriotism. The Funeral Oration illustrates how a seductive charismatic leader undermines Aristotelian conditions of ideal citizenship by subordinating the (...)
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  2.  23
    How Greek Was My Nietzsche?Christopher Vasillopulos - 2005 - Dialogue and Universalism 15 (5-6):35-42.
    The thesis is that the Apollonian-Dionysian dialectic partially illuminates the dialectical relationship between the Will to Power and the Eternal Recurrence. The Apollonian-Dionysian synthesis restores the Will to Power, despite the necessities of the Eternal Recurrence, not because anything changes but because nothing can. One must succumb to the ecstasy of action, defying the paralysis of understanding while acknowledging its eternal power.
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  3.  41
    Heroism, self-abnegation and the liberal organization.Christopher Vasillopulos - 1988 - Journal of Business Ethics 7 (8):585 - 591.
    Chester Barnard's classic, The Functions of the Executive, is premised on an Aristotelean conception of human nature. This reliance ramifies throughout his analysis of the cooperative basis of human organizations. Perhaps its most important manifestation appears in his definition of willing cooperation as self-abnegation. For by so removing cooperation from its utilitarian and contractarian assumptions, he avoids the well known criticisms of those assumptions while retaining his fundamental liberalism. Put positively, self-abnegation informs Barnard's liberalism with an heroic dimension. This, in (...)
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    Prologue.Christopher Vasillopulos & Panos Eliopoulos - 2015 - Dialogue and Universalism 25 (1):7-8.
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  5.  4
    The Iliad. The First Political Theory.Christopher Vasillopulos - 2013 - Dialogue and Universalism 23 (4):161-172.
    Achilles’ dissatisfaction with the heroic code, despite his preeminence, is Homer’s platform on which he demonstrates that the code is an inadequate basis for the emerging polis. The political requires a new kind of man, one capable of love and friendship. For only this kind of man can be a proper citizen, a person capable of more than adherence to a heroic code.
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    The Natural Rights Basis of Aristotelian Education.Christopher Vasillopulos - 2011 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 30 (1):19-36.
    It is commonplace to speak of education as a right. Yet it has been seldom defended as a natural right. Natural rights are pre-social, while education is social intrinsically. This analysis attempts to show how Aristotle’s concept of education can be conceived as a natural and necessary process to fulfill individual autonomy. In this sense it approaches Locke’s conception of a natural right. To the degree that it succeeds, the firmest possible basis for education in modern constitutionally premised social order (...)
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