Results for 'Christopher P. Alfeld'

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  1.  29
    Non-Branching Degrees in the Medvedev Lattice of [image] Classes.Christopher P. Alfeld - 2007 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 72 (1):81 - 97.
    A $\Pi _{1}^{0}$ class is the set of paths through a computable tree. Given classes P and Q, P is Medvedev reducible to Q, P ≤M Q, if there is a computably continuous functional mapping Q into P. We look at the lattice formed by $\Pi _{1}^{0}$ subclasses of 2ω under this reduction. It is known that the degree of a splitting class of c.e. sets is non-branching. We further characterize non-branching degrees, providing two additional properties which guarantee non-branching: inseparable (...)
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  2.  39
    Classifying the Branching Degrees in the Medvedev Lattice of $\Pi^0_1$ Classes.Christopher P. Alfeld - 2008 - Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 49 (3):227-243.
    A $\Pi^0_1$ class can be defined as the set of infinite paths through a computable tree. For classes $P$ and $Q$, say that $P$ is Medvedev reducible to $Q$, $P \leq_M Q$, if there is a computably continuous functional mapping $Q$ into $P$. Let $\mathcal{L}_M$ be the lattice of degrees formed by $\Pi^0_1$ subclasses of $2^\omega$ under the Medvedev reducibility. In "Non-branching degrees in the Medvedev lattice of $\Pi \sp{0}\sb{1} classes," I provided a characterization of nonbranching/branching and a classification of (...)
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  3.  57
    Spinoza's Formal Mechanism.Christopher P. Martin - 2017 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 99 (S1):151-181.
    I defend a new reading of Spinoza's account of causation that reconciles the strengths of the mechanist and formal cause interpretations by locating instances of nature's fixed and unchanging laws inside individual natures; natures are efficacious because that's where the laws are. God's necessity, for instance, follows from certain logical principles contained within God's nature. Causes between finite particulars likewise stem entirely from finite natures. They do so, I argue, because finite instances of nature's fixed and unchanging laws are inscribed (...)
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  4.  50
    A Pathway for Educating Moral Intuition.Christopher P. Adkins - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics Education 8 (1):383-391.
    Despite the emphasis on moral intuition in the research literature, little attention has been given to the ways in which moral intuition can be educated within management settings (Dane & Pratt 2007). In this paper, I discuss an experiential learning approach that links Robin Hogarth’s (2001, 2008) work on the learning of intuition with Mary Gentile’s (2010) educational program on values-based leadership, Giving Voice To Values (GVV). Building on Hogarth’s proposal that intuitions are primarily acquired and thus shaped by our (...)
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  5. Once more with feeling : integrating emotion in teaching business ethics' educational implications from cognitive neuroscience and social psychology.Christopher P. Adkins - 2011 - In Ronald R. Sims & William I. Sauser (eds.), Experiences in Teaching Business Ethics. Information Age.
  6.  95
    The Framework of Essences in Spinoza's Ethics.Christopher P. Martin - 2008 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 16 (3):489 – 509.
    (2008). The Framework of Essences in Spinoza's Ethics. British Journal for the History of Philosophy: Vol. 16, No. 3, pp. 489-509. doi: 10.1080/09608780802200489.
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  7.  46
    10.5840/jbee20118134.Christopher P. Adkins - 2000 - Journal of Business Ethics Education 1 (1):383-391.
    Despite the emphasis on moral intuition in the research literature, little attention has been given to the ways in which moral intuition can be educated within management settings. In this paper, I discuss an experiential learning approach that links Robin Hogarth’s work on the learning of intuition with Mary Gentile’s educational program on values-based leadership, Giving Voice To Values. Building on Hogarth’s proposal that intuitions are primarily acquired and thus shaped by our experiences, GVV offers a pedagogical framework for reflective, (...)
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  8.  14
    Critical Thinking: Conceptual Perspectives and Practical Guidelines.Christopher P. Dwyer - 2017 - Cambridge University Press.
    Dwyer's book is unique and distinctive as it presents and discusses a modern conceptualization of critical thinking – one that is commensurate with the exponential increase in the annual output of knowledge. The abilities of navigating new knowledge outputs, engaging in enquiry and constructively solving problems are not only important in academic contexts, but are also essential life skills. Specifically, the book provides a modern, detailed, accessible and integrative model of critical thinking that accounts for critical thinking sub-skills and real-world (...)
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  9.  22
    Aristotle’s Phenomenology of Form.Christopher P. Long - 2007 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 11 (2):435-448.
    Scholars often assume that Aristotle uses the terms morphē and eidos interchangeably. Translators of Aristotle's works rarely feel the need to carry the distinctionbetween these two Greek terms over into English. This article challenges the orthodox view that morphē and eidos are synonymous. Careful analysis of texts fromthe Categories, Physics, and Metaphysics in which these terms appear in close proximity reveals a fundamental tension of Aristotle's thinking concerning the being of natural beings. Morphē designates the form as inseparable from the (...)
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  10. The ontological reappropriation of phronēsis.Christopher P. Long - 2002 - Continental Philosophy Review 35 (1):35-60.
    Ontology has been traditionally guided by sophia, a form of knowledge directed toward that which is eternal, permanent, necessary. This tradition finds an important early expression in the philosophical ontology of Aristotle. Yet in the Nicomachean Ethics, Aristotle's intense concern to do justice to the world of finite contingency leads him to develop a mode of knowledge, phronsis, that implicitly challenges the hegemony of sophia and the economy of values on which it depends. Following in the tradition of the early (...)
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  11. Planetary ecosynthesis on Mars : restoration ecology and environmental ethics.Christopher P. McKay - 2009 - In Constance M. Bertka (ed.), Exploring the Origin, Extent, and Future of Life: Philosophical, Ethical, and Theological Perspectives. Cambridge University Press.
     
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  12.  21
    The Ethics of Ontology: Rethinking an Aristotelian Legacy.Christopher P. Long - 2004 - State University of New York Press.
    A novel rereading of the relationship between ethics and ontology in Aristotle.
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  13.  46
    Primary care, patient autonomy, and healthcare justice.Christopher P. Morley - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (10):22 – 23.
  14. Phenomenology and the Problem of Foundations: A Critique of Edmund Husserl's Theory of Science.Christopher P. Prendergast - 1979 - Dissertation, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale
     
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  15.  49
    Crisis of Community.Christopher P. Long - 2011 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 15 (2):361-377.
    In Plato’s Protagoras Alcibiades plays the role of Hermes, the ‘ambassador god,’ who helps lead Socrates’ conversation with Protagoras through a crisis of dialogue that threatens to destroy the community of education established by the dialogue itself. By tracing the moments when Alcibiades intervenes in the conversation, we are led to an understanding of Socratic politics as always concerned with the course of the life of an individual and the proper time in which it might be turned toward the question (...)
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  16.  12
    Crisis of Community.Christopher P. Long - 2011 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 15 (2):361-377.
    In Plato’s Protagoras Alcibiades plays the role of Hermes, the ‘ambassador god,’ who helps lead Socrates’ conversation with Protagoras through a crisis of dialogue that threatens to destroy the community of education established by the dialogue itself. By tracing the moments when Alcibiades intervenes in the conversation, we are led to an understanding of Socratic politics as always concerned with the course of the life of an individual and the proper time in which it might be turned toward the question (...)
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  17. Immanence and Causation in Spinoza.Christopher P. Martin - 2015 - In Andre Santos Campos (ed.), Spinoza: Basic Concepts. Imprint Academic. pp. 14-24.
    I defend an expanded reading of immanent causation that includes both inherence and causal efficacy; I argue that the latter is required if God is to remain the immanent cause of finite modes.
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  18.  76
    Self-Moving Machines and the Soul: Leibniz Contra Spinoza on the Spiritual Automaton.Christopher P. Noble - 2017 - The Leibniz Review 27:65-89.
    The young Spinoza and the mature Leibniz both characterize the soul as a self-moving spiritual automaton. Though it is unclear if Leibniz’s use of the term was suggested to him from his reading of Spinoza, Leibniz was aware of its presence in Spinoza’s Treatise on the Emendation of the Intellect. Considering Leibniz’s staunch opposition to Spinozism, the question arises as to why he was willing to adopt this term. I propose an answer to this question by comparing the spiritual automaton (...)
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  19.  57
    Aristotle on the nature of truth.Christopher P. Long - 2010 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    This book articulates the nature of truth as a cooperative activity between human beings and the natural world that is rooted in our endeavors to do justice to the nature of things.
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  20. The intertwinement of legal and economic systems in transition.Christopher P. Ball - 2002 - Rechtstheorie 33 (2-4):299-317.
     
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  21.  27
    The Search on Mars for a Second Genesis of Life in the Solar System and the Need for Biologically Reversible Exploration.Christopher P. McKay - 2018 - Biological Theory 13 (2):103-110.
    The discovery of a second genesis of life besides the one on Earth, this time on Mars, would have profound scientific and philosophical implications. Scientifically, it would provide a second example of biochemistry and of evolutionary history. Many important biological questions may be answerable through the comparison of biochemistry between the life forms on the two planets. Philosophically, the discovery of a second genesis of life in our solar system would suggest that the phenomenon of life is distributed throughout the (...)
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  22.  72
    Leibniz on the Divine Preformation of Souls and Bodies.Christopher P. Noble - 2019 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 9 (2):327-342.
    For the mature Leibniz, a living being is a created substance composed of an infinitely complex organic body and a simple, immaterial soul. Soul and body do not interact directly, but rather their states correspond according to a harmony preestablished by God. I show that Leibniz’s theory faces challenges with respect to the question of whether substances need to possess knowledge of how they bring about their effects, and I argue that, to address these challenges, Leibniz turns to a concept (...)
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  23.  40
    Immaterial Mechanism in the Mature Leibniz.Christopher P. Noble - 2019 - Idealistic Studies 49 (1):1-21.
    Leibniz standardly associates “mechanism” with extended material bodies and their aggregates. In this paper, I identify and analyze a further distinct sense of “mechanism” in Leibniz that extends, by analogy, beyond the domain of material bodies and applies to the operations of immaterial substances such as the monads that serve, for Leibniz, as the metaphysical foundations of physical reality. I argue that in this sense, Leibniz understands “mechanism” as an intelligible process that is capable of providing a sufficient reason for (...)
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  24.  64
    Maximizing Human Potential: Capabilities Theory and the Professional Work Environment.Christopher P. Vogt - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 58 (1-3):111-123.
    . Human capabilities theory has emerged as an important framework for measuring whether various social systems promote human flourishing. The premise of this theory is that human beings share some nearly universal capabilities; what makes a human life fulfilling is the opportunity to exercise these capabilities. This essay proposes that the use of human capabilities theory can be expanded to assess whether a company has organized the work environment in such a way that allows workers to develop a variety of (...)
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  25.  32
    Ethical Problems in Rural Healthcare: Local Symptoms, Systemic Disease.Christopher P. Morley & Peter G. Beatty - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (4):59-60.
  26. Bothering to love: James F. Keenan's retrieval and reinvention of Catholic ethics.Christopher P. Vogt & Kate Ward (eds.) - 2024 - Maryknoll, NY: Orbis Books.
    Essays honoring the work of Catholic ethicist James F. Keenan.
     
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  27.  39
    A response to the problem of wild coincidences.Christopher P. Taggart - 2020 - Synthese 198 (12):11421-11435.
    Derk Pereboom has posed an empirical objection to agent-causal libertarianism: The best empirically confirmed scientific theories feature physical laws predicting no long-run deviations from fixed conditional frequencies that govern events. If agent-causal libertarianism were true, however, then it would be virtually certain, absent ‘wild coincidences’, that such long-run deviations would occur. So, current empirical evidence makes agent-causal libertarianism unlikely. This paper formulates Pereboom’s ‘Problem of Wild Coincidences’ as a five-step argument and considers two recent responses. Then, it offers a different (...)
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  28.  33
    Automata, reason, and free will: Leibniz's critique of Descartes on animal and human nature.Christopher P. Noble - 2023 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 100 (C):56-63.
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  29. to manage with integrity: undergraduate and MBA applications of the "Giving voices to values" curriculum.P. Adkins Christopher, C. Gentile Mary & Špela Trefalt Cynthia Ingols - 2011 - In Charles Wankel & Agata Stachowicz-Stanusch (eds.), Management education for integrity: ethically educating tomorrow's business leaders. Emerald.
     
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  30.  10
    Socratic and Platonic Political Philosophy: Practicing a Politics of Reading.Christopher P. Long - 2014 - New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.
    In the Gorgias, Socrates claims to practice the true art of politics, but the peculiar politics he practices involves cultivating in each individual he encounters an erotic desire to live a life animated by the ideals of justice, beauty and the good. Socratic and Platonic Political Philosophy demonstrates that what Socrates sought to do with those he encountered, Platonic writing attempts to do with readers. Christopher P. Long's attentive readings of the Protagoras, Gorgias, Phaedo, Apology, and Phaedrus invite us (...)
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  31.  68
    Reading Feynman Into Nanotechnology.Christopher P. Toumey - 2008 - Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology 12 (3):133-168.
    As histories of nanotechnology are created, one question arises repeatedly: how influential was Richard Feynman’s 1959 talk, “There’s Plenty of Room at the Bottom”? It is often said by knowledgeable people that this talk was the origin of nanotech. It preceded events like the invention of the scanning tunneling microscope, but did it inspire scientists to do things they would not have done otherwise? Did Feynman’s paper directly influence important scientific developments in nanotechnology? Or is his paper being retroactively read (...)
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  32.  26
    The Moral Character of Mad Scientists: A Cultural Critique of Science.Christopher P. Toumey - 1992 - Science, Technology and Human Values 17 (4):411-437.
    The mad scientist stories of fiction and film are exercises in antirationalism, particularly its Gothic horror variant. As such, they convey the argument that rationalist secular science is dangerous, and their principal device for doing so is to invest the evil of science in the personality of the scientist. To understand this cultural critique of science, it is necessary to understand how the symbols of the scientist's personality are manipulated. This article argues that mad scientists become increasingly amoral as nineteenth-century (...)
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  33.  50
    Reading Feynman Into Nanotechnology.Christopher P. Toumey - 2008 - Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology 12 (3):133-168.
    As histories of nanotechnology are created, one question arises repeatedly: how influential was Richard Feynman’s 1959 talk, “There’s Plenty of Room at the Bottom”? It is often said by knowledgeable people that this talk was the origin of nanotech. It preceded events like the invention of the scanning tunneling microscope, but did it inspire scientists to do things they would not have done otherwise? Did Feynman’s paper directly influence important scientific developments in nanotechnology? Or is his paper being retroactively read (...)
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  34.  18
    Preservation of Static Lifeless Landscapes in the Antarctic Dry Valleys and the Atacama Desert and Applications to the Moon and Mars.Christopher P. McKay - 2021 - Ethics and the Environment 26 (1):105-120.
    Abstract:Environmental ethics and policy have been largely developed around the concept of nature as a dynamic collection of living beings in direct interaction with humans. However, when we consider the Moon, Mars, and other worlds we encounter profoundly static and lifeless nature with essentially no history of human interaction. On what basis do we make decisions on the preservation or utilization of such lifeless landscapes? Here I suggest that static lifeless landscapes on other worlds have some parallels on Earth in (...)
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  35.  21
    Between Reification and Mystification: Rethinking the Economy of Principles.Christopher P. Long & Richard A. Lee - 2001 - Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 2001 (120):95-111.
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  36.  47
    Dancing Naked with Socrates.Christopher P. Long - 2003 - Ancient Philosophy 23 (1):49-69.
  37.  24
    The Hegemony of Form and the Resistance of Matter.Christopher P. Long - 1999 - Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 21 (2):21-46.
    At the beginning of his book, Methode und Beweisziel im ersten Buch der “Physikvorlesung” des Aristoteles, Johannes Fritsche announces that the theme of the work is to be more or less Aristotle’s Physics. It is to be less about the Physics insofar as it treats only two sentences of its first book—the first sentence of chapter one and a sentence taken from its decisive seventh chapter. It is to be more about the Physics insofar as it explicates these two sentences (...)
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  38.  75
    The rhetoric of the geometrical method: Spinoza's double strategy.Christopher P. Long - 2001 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 34 (4):292-307.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Philosophy and Rhetoric 34.4 (2001) 292-307 [Access article in PDF] The Rhetoric of the Geometrical Method Spinoza's Double Strategy Christopher P. Long A double strategy may be apprehended in the first definitions, axioms and propositions of Spinoza's Ethics: the one is rhetorical, the other, systematic. Insofar as these opening passages constitute a geometrical argument that leads ultimately to the strict monism that lies at the heart of Spinoza's (...)
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  39.  38
    Aristotle’s Phenomenology of Form.Christopher P. Long - 2007 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 11 (2):435-448.
    Scholars often assume that Aristotle uses the terms morphē and eidos interchangeably. Translators of Aristotle's works rarely feel the need to carry the distinctionbetween these two Greek terms over into English. This article challenges the orthodox view that morphē and eidos are synonymous. Careful analysis of texts fromthe Categories, Physics, and Metaphysics in which these terms appear in close proximity reveals a fundamental tension of Aristotle's thinking concerning the being of natural beings. Morphē designates the form as inseparable from the (...)
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  40. Between the Universal and the Singular in Aristotle.Christopher P. Long - 2003 - Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 2003 (126):25-40.
     
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  41.  48
    Cultivating Communities of Learning with Digital Media.Christopher P. Long - 2010 - Teaching Philosophy 33 (4):347-361.
    Digital media technology, when deployed in ways that cultivate shared learning communities in which students and teachers are empowered to participate as partners in conjoint educational practices, can transform the way we teach and learn philosophy. This essay offers a model for how to put blogging and podcasting in the service of a cooperative approach to education that empowers students to take ownership of their education and enables teachers to cultivate in themselves and their students the excellences of dialogue. The (...)
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  42.  17
    Socrates: Platonic political ideal.Christopher P. Long - 2012 - Ideas Y Valores 61 (149):11-38.
    This essay articulates the differences and suggests the similarities between the practices of Socratic political speaking and those of Platonic political writing. The essay delineates Socratic speaking and Platonic writing as both erotically oriented toward ideals capable of transforming the lives of individuals and their relationships with one another. Besides it shows that in the Protagoras the practices of Socratic political speaking are concerned less with Protagoras than with the individual young man, Hippocrates. In the Phaedo, this ideal of a (...)
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  43.  91
    Two Powers, One Ability: The Understanding and Imagination in Kant’s Critical Philosophy.Christopher P. Long - 2010 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 36 (2):233-253.
    This essay suggests the possibility of conceiving the transcendental synthesis of imagination in Kant's Critique of Pure Reason as the understanding at work on sensibility by developing an active conception of identity according to which the distinction between the imagination and the understanding is merely nominal. Aristotle's philosophy is shown both to provide such a conception of identity and to be tacitly at work in Kant's thinking. Finally, the essay traces this position into the discussion of aesthetic judgment in the (...)
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  44.  29
    The Voice of Singularity and a Philosophy to Come.Christopher P. Long - 2009 - Philosophy Today 53 (Supplement):138-150.
  45.  35
    Continuity, containment, and coincidence: Leibniz in the history of the exact sciences: Vincenzo De Risi (ed.): Leibniz and the structure of sciences: modern perspectives on the history of logic, mathematics, and epistemology. Dordrecht: Springer, 2019, 298pp, 103.99€ HB.Christopher P. Noble - 2020 - Metascience 29 (3):523-526.
  46.  23
    Living Mirrors: Infinity, Unity, and Life in Leibniz's Philosophy, by O. Nachtomy.Christopher P. Noble - 2019 - The Leibniz Review 29:141-155.
  47.  30
    On Analogies in Leibniz’s Philosophy: Scientific Discovery and the Case of the Spiritual Automaton.Christopher P. Noble - 2017 - Quaestiones Disputatae 7 (2):8-30.
    This paper analyzes Leibniz’s use of analogies in both natural philosophical and metaphysical contexts. Through an examination of Leibniz’s notes on scientific methodology, I show that Leibniz explicitly recognizes the utility of analogies as heuristic tools that aid us in conceiving unfamiliar theoretical domains. I further argue that Leibniz uses the notion of a self-moving machine or automaton to help capture the activities of the immaterial soul. My account helps resist the conventional image of Leibniz as an arch-rationalist unconcerned with (...)
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  48.  3
    Doctor Strange, Moral Responsibility, and the God Question.Christopher P. Klofft - 2018 - In Mark D. White (ed.), Doctor Strange and Philosophy. Chichester, UK: Wiley. pp. 238–249.
    As Sorcerer Supreme, Doctor Stephen Strange has had several occasions in which he had to deal with the concept of a personal God. Despite his lack of traditional faith, there are important instances in which Doctor Strange acknowledges the Creator God using expressions drawn from the Western monotheistic traditions. In his Metaphysics, the ancient Greek philosopher Aristotle presents the idea of God, or more specifically a god among the gods, who is responsible for the origin and operation of the whole (...)
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  49.  36
    Cadaverine and burying in the laboratory rat.Christopher P. Montoya, Robert J. Sutherland & Ian Q. Whishaw - 1981 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 18 (3):118-120.
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  50.  8
    Coexistence or Conflict? A European Perspective on GMOs and the Problem of Liability.Christopher P. Rodgers - 2007 - Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society 27 (3):233-250.
    In March 2004, the U.K. government announced its intention to grant limited authorization for the growing of commercial genetically modified (GM) crops. This article reviews the potential liabilities that may arise from GM cropping, for environmental damage and for economic losses claimed by non-GM producers. It considers the application of the European Community (EC) Environmental Liability Directive of 2004 to genetically modified organisms (GMO) releases, and the proposed statutory scheme for the coexistence of GM and non-GM agriculture in England and (...)
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