Results for 'Christopher Domhnall Mag Uidhir'

988 found
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  1.  7
    Failed-Art and Failed Art-Theory.Christopher Mag Uidhir - 2010 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 88 (3):381-400.
    An object being non-art appears only trivially informative. Some non-art objects, however, could be saliently ‘almost’ art, and therefore objects for which being non-art is non-trivially informative. I call these kinds of non-art objects ‘failed-art’ objects—non-art objects aetiologically similar to art-objects, diverging only in virtue of some relevant failure. I take failed-art to be the right sort of thing, to result from the right sort of action, and to have the right sort of history required to be art, but to (...)
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  2.  9
    Failed-Art and Failed Art-Theory.Christopher Mag Uidhir - 2010 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 88 (3):381-400.
    An object being non-art appears only trivially informative. Some non-art objects, however, could be saliently ‘almost’ art, and therefore objects for which being non-art is non-trivially informative. I call these kinds of non-art objects ‘failed-art’ objects—non-art objects aetiologically similar to art-objects, diverging only in virtue of some relevant failure. I take failed-art to be the right sort of thing, to result from the right sort of action, and to have the right sort of history required to be art, but to (...)
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  3. Does Art Pluralism Lead to Eliminativism?P. D. Magnus & Christy Mag Uidhir - 2024 - Estetika: The European Journal of Aesthetics 61 (1):73-80.
    A critical note on Christopher Bartel and Jack M. C. Kwong, ‘Pluralism, Eliminativism, and the Definition of Art’, Estetika 58 (2021): 100–113. Art pluralism is the view that there is no single, correct account of what art is. Instead, art is understood through a plurality of art concepts and with considerations that are different for particular arts. Although avowed pluralists have retained the word ‘art’ in their discussions, it is natural to ask whether the considerations that motivate pluralism should (...)
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  4.  85
    Art Concept Pluralism.Christy Mag Uidhir & P. D. Magnus - 2011 - Metaphilosophy 42 (1-2):83-97.
    Abstract: There is a long tradition of trying to analyze art either by providing a definition (essentialism) or by tracing its contours as an indefinable, open concept (anti-essentialism). Both art essentialists and art anti-essentialists share an implicit assumption of art concept monism. This article argues that this assumption is a mistake. Species concept pluralism—a well-explored position in philosophy of biology—provides a model for art concept pluralism. The article explores the conditions under which concept pluralism is appropriate, and argues that they (...)
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  5. Why Pornography Can't Be Art.Christy Mag Uidhir - 2009 - Philosophy and Literature 33 (1):193-203.
    Claims that pornography cannot be art typically depend on controversial claims about essential value differences (moral, aesthetic) between pornography and art. In this paper, I offer a value-neutral exclusionary claim, showing pornography to be descriptively at odds with art. I then show how my view is an improvement on similar claims made by Jerrold Levinson. Finally I draw parallels between art and pornography and art and advertising as well as show that my view is consistent with our typical usage of (...)
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  6. Minimal authorship (of sorts).Christy Mag Uidhir - 2011 - Philosophical Studies 154 (3):373 - 387.
    I propose a minimal account of authorship that specifies the fundamental nature of the author-relation and its minimal domain composition in terms of a three-place causal-intentional relation holding between agents and sort-relative works. I contrast my account with the minimal account tacitly held by most authorship theories, which is a two-place relation holding between agents and works simpliciter. I claim that only my view can ground productive and informative principled distincitons between collective production and collective authorship.
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  7. Photographic Art: An Ontology Fit to Print.Christy Mag Uidhir - 2012 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 70 (1):31-42.
    A standard art-ontological position is to construe repeatable artworks as abstract objects that admit multiple concrete instances. Since photographic artworks are putatively repeatable, the ontology of photographic art is by default modelled after standard repeatable-work ontology. I argue, however, that the construal of photographic artworks as abstracta mistakenly ignores photography’s printmaking genealogy, specifically its ontological inheritance. More precisely, I claim that the products of printmaking media (prints) minimally must be construed in a manner consistent with basic print ontology, the most (...)
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  8.  96
    Recordings as Performances.Christy Mag Uidhir - 2007 - British Journal of Aesthetics 47 (3):298-314.
    This article claims that there is no in principle aesthetic difference between a live performance and a recording of that performance, and as such, performance individuation ought to be revised to reflect this. We ought to regard performances as types able to be instantiated both by live performances and by recordings of those performances, or we ought to abandon performances qua aesthetic objects.
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  9. The Paradox of Suspense Realism.Christy Mag Uidhir - 2011 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 69 (2):161-171.
    Most theories of suspense implicitly or explicitly have as a background assumption what I call suspense realism, i.e., that suspense is itself a genuine, distinct emotion. I claim that for a theory of suspense to entail suspense realism is for that theory to entail a contradiction, and so, we ought instead assume a background of suspense eliminativism, i.e., that there is no such genuine, distinct emotion that is the emotion of suspense. More precisely, I argue that i) any suspense realist (...)
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  10. An eliminativist theory of suspense.Christy Mag Uidhir - 2011 - Philosophy and Literature 35 (1):121-133.
    Motivating philosophical interest in the notion of suspense requires comparatively little appeal to what goes on in our ordinary work-a-day lives. After all, with respect to our everyday engagements with the actual world suspense appears to be largely absent—most of us seem to lead lives relatively suspense-free. The notion of suspense strikes us as interesting largely because of its significance with respect to our engagements with (largely fictional) narratives. So, when I indicate a preference for suspense novels, I indicate a (...)
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  11.  66
    How to Frame Serial Art.Christy Mag Uidhir - 2013 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 71 (3):261-265.
    Most artworks—or at least most among those standardly subject to philosophical scrutiny—appear to be singular, stand-alone works. However, some artworks (indeed, perhaps a good many) are by contrast best viewed in terms of some larger grouping or ordering of artworks. i.e., as a series. The operative art-theoretic notion of series in which I am interested here is that of an individual and distinct artwork that is itself non-trivially composed of a non-trivial sequence of artworks (e.g., Walter de Maria’s Statement Series, (...)
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  12. Failed-Art and Failed Art-Theory.Christy Mag Uidhir - 2010 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 88 (3):381-400.
    An object being non-art appears only trivially informative. Some non-art objects, however, could be saliently 'almost' art, and therefore objects for which being non-art is non-trivially informative. I call these kinds of non-art objects 'failed-art' objects—non-art objects aetiologically similar to art-objects, diverging only in virtue of some relevant failure. I take failed-art to be the right sort of thing, to result from the right sort of action, and to have the right sort of history required to be art, but to (...)
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  13.  17
    The Aesthetics of Actor-Character Race Matching in Film Fictions.Christy Mag Uidhir - 2012 - Philosophers' Imprint 12.
    Marguerite Clark as Topsy in Uncle Tom’s Cabin (1918). Charlton Heston as Ramon Miguel Vargas in Touch of Evil (1958). Mizuo Peck as Sacagawea in Night at the Museum (2006). From the early days of cinema to its classic-era through to the contemporary Hollywood age, the history of cinema is replete with films in which the racial (or ethnic) background of a principal character does not match the background of the actor or actress portraying that character. I call this actor-character (...)
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  14. Aesthetic Higher-Order Evidence for Subjectivists.Luis Oliveira & Chris Mag Uidhir - 2023 - British Journal of Aesthetics 63 (2):235-249.
    Aesthetic subjectivism takes the truth of aesthetic judgments to be relative to the individual making that judgment. Despite widespread suspicion, however, this does not mean that one cannot be wrong about such judgments. Accordingly, this does not mean that one cannot gain higher-order evidence of error and fallibility that bears on the rationality of the aesthetic judgment in question. In this paper, we explain and explore these issues in some detail.
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  15.  9
    Art & Art-Attempts.Christy Mag Uidhir - 2013 - Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    Although few philosophers agree about what it is for something to be art, most, if not all, agree on one thing: art must be in some sense intention dependent. Art and Art-Attempts is about what follows from taking intention dependence seriously as a substantive necessary condition for something's being art. Christy Mag Uidhir argues that from the assumption that art must be the product of intentional action, along with basic action-theoretic account of attempts (goal-oriented intention-directed activity), follows a host (...)
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  16.  7
    Introduction.Christy Mag Uidhir - 2015 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 73 (1):1-8.
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  17. Comics & Seriality.Christy Mag Uidhir - 2016 - In Frank Bramlett, Roy T. Cook & Aaron Meskin (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Comics. Routledge. pp. 248-256.
     
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  18.  94
    Introduction to Special Issue on Printmaking.Christy Mag Uidhir - 2015 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 73 (1):1-8.
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  19. A Miscast of Character: Actors, Characters, & Character Actors.Mag Uidhir Christy - 2016 - In Iskra Fileva (ed.), Questions of Character. New York, US: Oxford University Press USA. pp. 444-458.
  20.  80
    Art, Metaphysics, & the Paradox of Standards.Christy Mag Uidhir - 2013 - In Art & Abstract Objects. Oxford University Press.
    I consider the field of aesthetics to be at its most productive and engaging when adopting a broadly philosophically informative approach to its core issues (e.g., shaping and testing putative art theoretic commitments against the relevant standard models employed in philosophy of language, metaphysics, and philosophy of mind) and to be at its most impotent and bewildering when cultivating a philosophically insular character (e.g., selecting interpretative, ontological, or conceptual models solely for fit with pre-fixed art theoretic commitments). For example, when (...)
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  21. A Portrait of the Artist as an Aesthetic Expert.Christy Mag Uidhir & Cameron Buckner - 2014 - In Greg Currie, Matthew Kieran, Aaron Meskin & Jon Robson (eds.), Aesthetics and the Sciences of Mind. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.
    For the most part, the Aesthetic Theory of Art—any theory of art claiming that the aesthetic is a descriptively necessary feature of art—has been repudiated, especially in light of what are now considered traditional counterexamples. We argue that the Aesthetic Theory of Art can instead be far more plausibly recast by abandoning aesthetic-feature possession by the artwork for a claim about aesthetic-concept possession by the artist. This move productively re-frames and re-energizes the debate surrounding the relationship between art and the (...)
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  22. Comics & Collective Authorship.Christy Mag Uidhir - 2011 - In Aaron Meskin, Roy T. Cook & Warren Ellis (eds.), The Art of Comics: A Philosophical Approach. Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 47-67.
    Most mass-art comics (e.g., “superhero” comics) are collectively produced, that is, different people are responsible for different production elements. As such, the more disparate comic production roles we begin to regard as significantly or uniquely contributory, the more difficult questions of comic authorship become, and the more we view various distinct production roles as potentially constitutive is the more we must view comic authorship as potentially collective authorship. Given the general unreliability of intuitions with respect to collective authorship (coupled with (...)
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  23.  11
    Art & Abstract Objects.Christy Mag Uidhir (ed.) - 2013 - Oxford University Press.
    Art and Abstract Objects presents a lively philosophical exchange between the philosophy of art and the core areas of philosophy. The standard way of thinking about non-repeatable (single-instance) artworks such as paintings, drawings, and non-cast sculpture is that they are concrete (i.e., material, causally efficacious, located in space and time). Da Vinci's Mona Lisa is currently located in Paris. Richard Serra's Tilted Arc is 73 tonnes of solid steel. Johannes Vermeer's The Concert was stolen in 1990 and remains missing. Michaelangelo's (...)
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  24. What's So Bad about Blackface?Christy Mag Uidhir - 2013 - In Mary K. Bloodsworth-Lugo & Dan Flory (eds.), Race, Philosophy, and Film. New York: Routledge. pp. 51-68.
    I argue that what’s so bad (qua film fiction) about the cinematic practice of actor-character race-mismatching—be it the historically infamous and intuitively repugnant practice of blackface or one of its more contemporary kin—is that the extent to which film-fictions employ such practices is typically the extent to which such film-fictions unrealistically depict facts about race. More precisely, I claim that race-mismatching film fictions—understood as a species of unrealistic fiction—are prima facie inconsistent fictions with the capacity to mislead their audiences about (...)
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  25. Pornography at the Edge: Depiction, Fiction, & Sexual Predilection.Christy Mag Uidhir & Henry Pratt - 2013 - In Hans Maes & Jerrold Levinson (eds.), Art and Pornography: Philosophical Essays. Oxford University Press. pp. 137-160.
    The primary purpose of depictive works of pornography, we take it, is sexual arousal through sexually explicit representations; what we callprototypical pornography satisfies those aims through the adoption of a ceteris paribus maximally realistic depictive style. Given that the purpose of sexual arousal seems best fulfilled by establishing the most robust connections between the viewer and the depictive subject, we find it curious that not all works of pornography aspire to prototypical status. Accordingly, we target for philosophical scrutiny several non-standard (...)
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  26.  94
    The Epistemic Misuse & Abuse of Pictorial Caricature.Christy Mag Uidhir - 2013 - American Philosophical Quarterly 50 (2):137-152.
    I claim that caricature is an epistemically defective depiction. More precisely, when employed in service to some epistemic uptake, I claim that caricature can have a non-negligible epistemic effect only for a less than ideally rational audience with certain cognitive biases. An ideally rational audience, however, would take all caricature to be what I refer to as fairground caricature, i.e., an interesting or entertaining form of depiction that is at best only trivially revelatory. I then argue that any medium (or (...)
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  27.  82
    Getting Emotional Over Contours: Response to Seeley.Christy Mag Uidhir - 2012 - Essays in Philosophy 13 (2):518-521.
    Bill Seeley suggests that what follows from research into crossmodal perception for expression and emotion in the arts is that there is an emotional contour (i.e., a contour constitutive of the content of an emotion and potentially realizable across a range of media). As a response of sorts, I speculate as to what this might hold for philosophical and empirical enquiry into expression and emotion across the arts as well as into the nature of the emotions themselves.
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  28. Art Concept Pluralism Undermines the Definitional Project.P. D. Magnus & Christy Mag Uidhir - 2022 - British Journal of Aesthetics 62 (1):81-84.
    This discussion note addresses Caleb Hazelwood’s ‘Practice-Centered Pluralism and a Disjunctive Theory of Art’. Hazelwood advances a disjunctive definition of art on the basis of an analogy with species concept pluralism in the philosophy of biology. We recognize the analogy between species and art, we applaud attention to practice, and we are bullish on pluralism—but it is a mistake to take these as the basis for a disjunctive definition.
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  29. Unlimited Additions to Limited Editions.Christy Mag Uidhir - 2009 - Contemporary Aesthetics 7.
    In this paper I target the relationship between two prints that are roughly qualitatively identical and share a causal history. Is one an artwork if and only if the other is an artwork? To answer this, I propose two competing principles. The first claims that certain intentional relations must be shared by the prints (e.g., editioned prints vs. non-editioned prints). The second, which I endorse, appeals only to minimal print ontology, claiming that the two prints need only be what I (...)
     
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  30.  81
    Unrealistic Fictions.Allan Hazlett & Christy Mag Uidhir - 2011 - American Philosophical Quarterly 48 (1):33--46.
    In this paper, we develop an analysis of unrealistic fiction that captures the everyday sense of ‘unrealistic’. On our view, unrealistic fictions are a species of inconsistent fictions, but fictions for which such inconsistency, given the supporting role we claim played by genre, needn’t be a critical defect. We first consider and reject an analysis of unrealistic fiction as fiction that depicts or describes unlikely events; we then develop our own account and make an initial statement of it: unrealistic fictions (...)
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  31.  9
    Only a Promise of Happiness: The Place of Beauty in a World of Art. [REVIEW]Christy Mag Uidhir - 2009 - Philosophical Review 118 (4):540-542.
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  32.  89
    Judging Covers.Cristyn Magnus, P. D. Magnus & Christy Mag Uidhir - 2013 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 71 (4):361-370.
    Cover versions form a loose but identifiable category of tracks and performances. We distinguish four kinds of covers and argue that they mark important differences in the modes of evaluation that are possible or appropriate for each: mimic covers, which aim merely to echo the canonical track; rendition covers, which change the sound of the canonical track; transformative covers, which diverge so much as to instantiate a distinct, albeit derivative song; and referential covers, which not only instantiate a distinct song, (...)
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  33. Introduction : art, metaphysics, and the paradox of standards.Christy Mag Uidhir - 2013 - In Christy Mag Uidhir (ed.), Art & Abstract Objects. Oxford University Press.
     
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  34.  11
    Comics and Collective Authorship.Christy Mag Uidhir - 2012-01-27 - In Aaron Meskin & Roy T. Cook (eds.), The Art of Comics. Wiley‐Blackwell. pp. 47–67.
    This chapter contains sections titled: Introduction A Cautious Set‐Up Minimal Authorship (of Sorts) Minimal Authorship (of the Comic Sort) Some Work for a Theory of Comic Authorship Illustrating Robust Comic Authorship Comic Authorship of the McCloudian Sort Appropriation Cases Commission Cases Collaborative Cases Non‐Collaborative Cases Final Thoughts Notes References.
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  35.  35
    Only a Promise of Happiness: The Place of Beauty in a World of Art.Christy Mag Uidhir - 2009 - Philosophical Review 118 (4):540-542.
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  36.  40
    Replies to Critics.Christy Mag Uidhir - 2018 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 52 (2):40.
    I am grateful to my critics for their careful attention to Art and Art-Attempts. Here I’ll respond to their central challenges.1As David Davies notes, I argue that Jerrold Levinson’s historical-intentional definition of art, despite the emphasis it places on intentions, does not pass my test of taking intention-dependence seriously. This is because it construes art-making as an activity that cannot fail: if we accept Levinson’s picture, every art-attempt is guaranteed to be a success. Davies suggests that, if we understand art-making (...)
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  37.  20
    Mag Uidhir on What Is “Minimally Viable” in “Art-Theoretic Space”.David Davies - 2018 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 52 (2):8.
    One of the most striking features of Christy Mag Uidhir’s rich and challenging book is the contrast between the modesty of its professed aim and the controversial nature of its professed conclusions. The aim is to investigate “what follows from taking intention-dependence seriously as a substantive necessary condition for being art.”1 The concern is not to give a theory of art but to clarify “the nature of the art-theoretic space that any art theory must occupy so as to be (...)
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  38.  64
    Mag Uidhir on performance.P. D. Magnus - 2008 - British Journal of Aesthetics 48 (3):338-345.
    Christy Mag Uidhir has recently argued (a) that there is no in principle aesthetic difference between a live performance and a recording of that performance, and (b) that the proper aesthetic object is a type which is instantiated by the performance and potentially repeatable when recordings are played back. This paper considers several objections to (a) and finds them lacking. I then consider improvised music, a subject that Mag Uidhir explicitly brackets in his discussion. Improvisation reveals problems with (...)
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  39.  80
    Christy Mag Uidhir, Art & Art-Attempts. Reviewed by. [REVIEW]Michel-Antoine Xhignesse - 2015 - Philosophy in Review 35 (3):182-184.
    A review of Christy Mag Uidhir's Art & Art-Attempts (OUP 2013).
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  40. Appreciating covers.Cristyn Magnus, P. D. Magnus, Christy Mag Uidhir & Ron Mcclamrock - 2022 - Nordic Journal of Aesthetics 31 (63).
    A recording or performance of a song is a cover if there is an earlier, canonical recording of the song. It can seem intuitive to think that properly appreciating a cover requires considering it in relation to the original, or at least that doing so will yield a deeper appreciation. This intuition is supported by some philosophical accounts of covers. And it is complicated by the possibility of hearing in, whereby one hears elements of the original version in the cover. (...)
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  41.  9
    Unfit to Print: Contra Mag Uidhir on the Ontology of Photographic Artworks.Alexey Aliyev - 2016 - Estetika: The European Journal of Aesthetics 53 (1):3-13.
    According to the orthodox view, photographic artworks are abstract objects. This view, however, has recently been challenged by Christy Mag Uidhir. In his article ‘Photographic Art: An Ontology Fit to Print’, he argues in favour of a nominalist construal of photographic artworks. My goal is to show that Mag Uidhir’s argument is unpersuasive.
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  42.  3
    Mag Uidhir, Christy, ed. Art and Abstract Objects. Oxford University Press, viii + 310 pp., $75.00 cloth. [REVIEW]James O. Young - 2014 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 72 (2):218-220.
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  43. Introduction to the Symposium on Christy Mag Uidhir's Art and Art-Attempts.Sherri Irvin - 2018 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 52 (2):1.
    Christy Mag Uidhir’s Art and Art-Attempts begins from two deceptively simple observations: artworks are the product of intentions, and intentions are the kinds of things that can fail to be realized successfully. Drawing on these observations, he argues that most contemporary theories of art must be rejected because they are not substantively intention-dependent: that is, they do not account for the fact that an attempt to make an artwork can fail. From his view that artworks must be the product (...)
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  44.  7
    Mag Uidhir, Christy. Art and Art‐Attempts. Oxford University Press, 2013, 232 pp., 14 b&w illus., $75.00 cloth. [REVIEW]Sondra Bacharach - 2015 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 73 (4):467-469.
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  45.  1
    I. Controversing.Mark Crimmins, Stephen Davies, James Harold, Christy Mag Uidhir, Stephen Maitzen, Lisa Moore, Margaret Moore, Robert Pasnau, Dave Robb & Nishi Shah - 2013 - In Christy Mag Uidhir (ed.), Art & Abstract Objects. Oxford University Press.
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  46. Art and Art-Attempts, by Christy Mag Uidhir.Inês Morais - forthcoming - Disputatio.
     
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  47.  70
    Wissen, Verstehen und Weisheit.Christoph Baumberger - 2019 - In Martin Grajner & Guido Melchior (eds.), Handbuch Erkenntnistheorie. Stuttgart: Metzler. pp. 110-115.
    Die Erkenntnistheorie wird meist als Theorie des Wissens charakterisiert. In jüngerer Zeit ist der alleinige Fokus auf Wissen kritisiert und sind weitere epistemische Güter diskutiert worden. Verstehen und Weisheit sind von besonderer Bedeutung. Erstens ist Verstehen ein hohes und Weisheit vielleicht das höchste epistemische Gut; beide scheinen epistemisch wertvoller zu sein als Wissen (Riggs 2003). Zudem ist unklar, ob der epistemische Wert von Wissen den Wert seiner Bestandteile (z.B. wahre, gerechtfertigte Meinung) übersteigt. Es ist behauptet worden, dass sich für Verstehen (...)
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  48.  4
    Mystik und Ethik bei Meister Eckhart und Johann Gottlieb Fichte. [REVIEW]Christoph Asmuth - 2002 - Fichte-Studien 19:238-243.
    Wunsch und Versuch, die Philosophie Meister Eckharts und Johann Gottlieb Fichtes zu vergleichen, gehören zu den problematischen Anstrengungen des vergangenen 20. Jahrhunderts. Einerseits ist nämlich unumstritten: Es gibt keinen Hinweis dafür, daß Fichte Schriften oder Zitate oder auch den Namen Meister Eckharts gekannt hätte. Was immer Fichte auch gedacht und geschrieben haben mag, es ist nicht auf eine Kenntnis oder Lektüre Eckharts zurückzuführen: Eine historische Arbeit findet hier keinen Anknüpfungspunkt oder nur einen ganz allgemeinen: die weitere Geschichte des Neuplatonismus. Andererseits (...)
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  49.  3
    Biographie (1806–1873).Christoph Schmidt-Petri - 2023 - In Frauke Höntzsch (ed.), Mill-Handbuch: Leben – Werk – Wirkung. J.B. Metzler. pp. 3-12.
    John Stuart Mill hatte ein außergewöhnliches Leben. Einige biographische Besonderheiten sind weithin bekannt: Seine Erziehung durch den strengen VaterMill, James ist legendär, seine komplizierte Beziehung zu seiner späteren Ehefrau Harriet TaylorTaylor, Harriet schon immer Anlass lebhafter Spekulationen. Etwas überraschend mag bei der ersten Beschäftigung mit Mills Leben sein, dass er weder studiert hat noch einer wissenschaftlichen Tätigkeit nachgegangen ist, zumindest nicht als Brotberuf; sein Lebenswerk erschuf er im Privatleben. Bekannt ist auch Mills Autobiography, die 1873 nach seinem Tod veröffentlicht wurde, (...)
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  50.  13
    Notrecht und Eigentumstheorie im Naturrecht, bei Kant und bei Fichte.Jean-Christophe Merle - 1997 - Fichte-Studien 11:41-61.
    Das Thema des Notrechts und des Eigentums beim jungen Fichte mag paradox scheinen. Im Beitrag zur Berichtigung der Urtheile des Publikums über die französische Revolution ist nämlich von einem Notrecht keine Spur zu finden. In der Grundlage des Naturrechts wird das Notrecht allerdings erörtert, um es aber sogleich aus dem Bereich des Rechts auszuschließen, wie auch Kant dies in der Rechtslehre unternimmt. Zumal behandelt Fichte dabei keineswegs eine Anwendung des Notrechts, in der ein Eigentum auf dem Spiel steht: bei den (...)
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