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  1. The Greeks on pleasure.Justin Cyril Bertrand Gosling & Christopher Charles Whiston Taylor - 1982 - New York: Oxford University Press. Edited by C. C. W. Taylor.
    Provides a critical and analytical history of ancient Greek theories on the nature of pleasure, and of its value and rolein human lfie, from the ealriest times down to the period of Epicurus and the early Stoics.
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    From the Beginning to Plato: Routledge History of Philosophy Volume 1.Christopher Charles Whiston Taylor (ed.) - 2003 - Routledge.
    This first volume in the series traces the development of philosophy over two-and-a-half centuries, from Thales at the beginning of the sixth century BC to the death of Plato in 347 BC.
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    Routledge History of Philosophy Volume I: From the Beginning to Plato.Christopher Charles Whiston Taylor (ed.) - 1997 - New York: Routledge.
    Volume 1 of the _Routledge History of Philosophy_ covers one of the most remarkable periods in human thought. In the space of two and a half centuries, philosophy developed from quasi-mythological speculation to a state in which many of the most fundamental questions about the universe, the mind and human conduct had been vigorously pursued, and some of the most enduring masterworks of Western thought had been written. The essays present the fundamental approaches and thinkers of Greek philosophy in chronological (...)
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    Socrates.Christopher Charles Whiston Taylor - 1998 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    Socrates has a unique position in the history of philosophy. His influence on Plato is credited with the development of Western philosophy. In this book Christopher Taylor explores the relationship between the historical Socrates and the Platonic character--and examines the enduring image of Socrates as the ideal exemplar of the philosophic life.
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