Results for 'Christoph Schroeder'

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  1.  18
    “Standing in the Breach”: Turning Away the Wrath of God.Christoph Schroeder - 1998 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 52 (1):16-23.
    Wrath is often understood as the dark and irrational side of God that can be appeased only through the offering of a scapegoat. The metaphor of a human “standing in the breach” defies this common understanding and points to the moral dimension of God's wrath.
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  2.  16
    Schroeder, Mark. Expressing Our Attitudes: Explanation and Expression in Ethics. Vol. 2.Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015. Pp. 272. $70.00. [REVIEW]Christopher Howard - 2017 - Ethics 127 (3):806-812.
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  3. Comments on Timothy Schroeder's Three Faces of Desire.Christopher S. Hill - manuscript
    Department of Philosophy Brown University Providence, RI 02912.
     
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  4.  9
    Ethical Dimensions of the Global Burden of Disease.Christopher J. L. Murray & S. Andrew Schroeder - 2020 - In Nir Eyal, Samia Hurst, Christopher J. L. Murray, S. Andrew Schroeder & Daniel Wikler (eds.), Measuring the Global Burden of Disease: Philosophical Dimensions. New York, NY, USA: pp. 24-47.
    This chapter suggests that descriptive epidemiological studies like the Global Burden of Disease Study can usefully be divided into four tasks: describing individuals’ health states over time, assessing their health states under a range of counterfactual scenarios, summarizing the information collected, and then packaging it for presentation. The authors show that each of these tasks raises important and challenging ethical questions. They comment on some of the philosophical issues involved in measuring health states, attributing causes to health outcomes, choosing the (...)
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  5.  6
    How Deep Is Your SNARC? Interactions Between Numerical Magnitude, Response Hands, and Reachability in Peripersonal Space.Johannes Lohmann, Philipp A. Schroeder, Hans-Christoph Nuerk, Christian Plewnia & Martin V. Butz - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  6.  71
    Measuring the Global Burden of Disease: Philosophical Dimensions.Nir Eyal, Samia A. Hurst, Christopher J. L. Murray, S. Andrew Schroeder & Daniel Wikler (eds.) - 2020 - New York, USA: Oup Usa.
    The Global Burden of Disease Study is one of the largest-scale research collaborations in global health, producing critical data for researchers, policy-makers, and health workers about more than 350 diseases, injuries, and risk factors. Such an undertaking is, of course, extremely complex from an empirical perspective. But it also raises complex ethical and philosophical questions. In this volume, a group of leading philosophers, economists, epidemiologists, and policy scholars identify and discuss these philosophical questions. Better appreciating the philosophical dimensions of a (...)
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  7.  49
    The Fundamentality of Fit.Christopher Howard - 2019 - Oxford Studies in Metaethics 14.
    Many authors, including Derek Parfit, T. M. Scanlon, and Mark Schroeder, favor a “reasons-first” ontology of normativity, which treats reasons as normatively fundamental. Others, most famously G. E. Moore, favor a “value-first” ontology, which treats value or goodness as normatively fundamental. Chapter 10 argues that both the reasons-first and value-first ontologies should be rejected because neither can account for all of the normative reasons that, intuitively, there are. It advances an ontology of normativity, originally suggested by Franz Brentano and (...)
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  8. Does Expressivism Have Subjectivist Consequences?Mark Schroeder - 2014 - Philosophical Perspectives 28 (1):278-290.
    Metaethical expressivists claim that we can explain what moral words like ‘wrong’ mean without having to know what they are about – but rather by saying what it is to think that something is wrong – namely, to disapprove of it. Given the close connection between expressivists’ theory of the meaning of moral words and our attitudes of approval and disapproval, expressivists have had a hard time shaking the intuitive charge that theirs is an objectionably subjectivist or mind-dependent view of (...)
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  9.  29
    Epistemology: Contexts, Values, Disagreements (Proceedings of the 34th International Ludwig Wittgenstein Symposium).Christoph Jäger & Winfried Loeffler (eds.) - 2012 - Ontos Verlag.
    The present volume collects papers that were presented at the 34th International Wittgenstein Symposium “Epistemology: Contexts, Values, Disagreement” 2011 in Kirchberg. Contributors include: P. Baumann, A. Beckermann, E. Brendel, J. Bromand, G. Brun, M. David, W. Davis, C. Elgin, E. Fischer, W. Freitag, S. Goldberg, J. Greco, E. Harcourt, A. Kemmerling, M. Kober, D. Koppelberg, A. Koritensky, H. Kornblith, M. Kusch, M. Lee, N. Miscevic, K. Munn, B. Niederbacher, E. J. Olsson, C. Piller, R. Raaatzsch, S. Schmoranzer, S. Schroeder, (...)
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  10. Our Entitlement to Self-Knowledge: II. Christopher Peacocke: Entitlement, Self-Knowledge and Conceptual Redeployment.Tyler Burge & Christopher Peacocke - 1996 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 96 (1):91-116.
  11.  94
    Deconstruction, Anti–Realism and Philosophy of Science—an Interview with Christopher Norris.Christopher Norris & Marianna Papastephanou - 2002 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 36 (2):265–289.
    In this interview, Christopher Norris discusses a wide range of issues having to do with postmodernism, deconstruction and other controversial topics of debate within present-day philosophy and critical theory. More specifically he challenges the view of deconstruction as just another offshoot of the broader postmodernist trend in cultural studies and the social sciences. Norris puts the case for deconstruction as continuing the 'unfinished project of modernity' and—in particular—for Derrida's work as sustaining the values of enlightened critical reason in various spheres (...)
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  12.  44
    Christopher Janaway.Christopher Janaway - 2006 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 80 (1):339–357.
  13.  3
    Christoph Schönborn, Hasard Ou Plan de Dieu. La Création Et L’Évolution Vues À la Lumière de la Foi Et de la Raison, Paris : Éd. Du Cerf, 2007, 152 Pages. [REVIEW]Christophe Battut - 2009 - Revue des Sciences Religieuses 83:137-138.
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  14.  46
    Christopher Dawson's View of Modern Capitalism.Christopher Dawson - 1997 - The Chesterton Review 23 (4):529-531.
  15. Mark Schroeder’s Hypotheticalism: Agent-Neutrality, Moral Epistemology, and Methodology. [REVIEW]Tristram McPherson - 2012 - Philosophical Studies 157 (3):445-453.
    Symposium contribution on Mark Schroeder's Slaves of the Passions. Argues that Schroeder's account of agent-neutral reasons cannot be made to work, that the limited scope of his distinctive proposal in the epistemology of reasons undermines its plausibility, and that Schroeder faces an uncomfortable tension between the initial motivation for his view and the details of the view he develops.
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  16. Belief, Credence, and Pragmatic Encroachment1.Jacob Ross & Mark Schroeder - 2014 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 88 (2):259-288.
    This paper compares two alternative explanations of pragmatic encroachment on knowledge (i.e., the claim that whether an agent knows that p can depend on pragmatic factors). After reviewing the evidence for such pragmatic encroachment, we ask how it is best explained, assuming it obtains. Several authors have recently argued that the best explanation is provided by a particular account of belief, which we call pragmatic credal reductivism. On this view, what it is for an agent to believe a proposition is (...)
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  17.  62
    Christopher J. Preston, Wayne Ouderkirk (Eds): Nature, Value, Duty: Life on Earth with Holmes Rolston, III. [REVIEW]Christopher C. Robinson - 2008 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 21 (5):477-484.
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  18.  44
    II—Christopher Shields: The Peculiar Motion of Aristotelian Souls.Christopher Shields - 2007 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 81 (1):139-161.
  19.  18
    Erratum: Schroeder, M.J. The Philosophy of Philosophies: Synthesis Through Diversity.Marcin Schroeder - 2018 - Philosophies 3 (3):18-0.
    The author wishes to add the following correction to his paper published in Philosophies [1]:The repeated fragment from lines 13–18 and part of 19 on page 69 should be deleted [...].
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  20. Christopher Chapple: Living Landscapes: Meditations on the Five Elements in Hindu, Buddhist, and Jain Yogas. [REVIEW]Christopher Miller - 2021 - Journal of Dharma Studies 4 (1):151-154.
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  21. Value and the Right Kind of Reason.Mark Schroeder - 2010 - Oxford Studies in Metaethics 5:25-55.
    Fitting Attitudes accounts of value analogize or equate being good with being desirable, on the premise that ‘desirable’ means not, ‘able to be desired’, as Mill has been accused of mistakenly assuming, but ‘ought to be desired’, or something similar. The appeal of this idea is visible in the critical reaction to Mill, which generally goes along with his equation of ‘good’ with ‘desirable’ and only balks at the second step, and it crosses broad boundaries in terms of philosophers’ other (...)
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  22. Having Reasons.Mark Schroeder - 2008 - Philosophical Studies 139 (1):57 - 71.
    What is it to have a reason? According to one common idea, the "Factoring Account", you have a reason to do A when there is a reason for you to do A which you have--which is somehow in your possession or grasp. In this paper, I argue that this common idea is false. But though my arguments are based on the practical case, the implications of this are likely to be greatest in epistemology: for the pitfalls we fall into when (...)
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  23.  38
    Reconsidering the Ad Hominem: Christopher M. Johnson.Christopher M. Johnson - 2009 - Philosophy 84 (2):251-266.
    Ad hominem arguments are generally dismissed on the grounds that they are not attempts to engage in rational discourse, but are rather aimed at undermining argument by diverting attention from claims made to assessments of character of persons making claims. The manner of this dismissal however is based upon an unlikely paradigm of rationality: it is based upon the presumption that our intellectual capacities are not as limited as in fact they are, and do not vary as much as they (...)
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  24.  14
    Christopher Hamlin. A Science of Impurity: Water Analysis in Nineteenth Century Britain. Bristol: Adam Hilger, 1990. Pp. Xiii + 342. ISBN 0-7503-0042-6. £45.00. [REVIEW]Christopher Lawrence - 1992 - British Journal for the History of Science 25 (2):279-280.
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  25.  27
    Janaway, Christopher, Ed. The Cambridge Companion to Schopenhauer.Christopher Field - 2001 - Review of Metaphysics 54 (3):658-660.
  26.  17
    II—Christopher Janaway.Christopher Janaway - 2006 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 80 (1):339-357.
  27.  17
    Christopher Winch and Peter Wells,Nene College, Northampton.Christopher Winch & Peter Wells - 1995 - British Journal of Educational Studies 43 (1):75-87.
  28.  68
    The Relation Between Self-Interest and Justice in Contractarian Ethics*: CHRISTOPHER W. MORRIS.Christopher W. Morris - 1988 - Social Philosophy and Policy 5 (2):119-153.
    One of the most noteworthy features of David Gauthier's rational choice, contractarian theory of morality is its appeal to self-interested rationality. This appeal, however, will undoubtedly be the source of much controversy and criticism. For while self-interestedness is characteristic of much human behavior, it is not characteristic of all such behavior, much less of that which is most admirable. Yet contractarian ethics appears to assume that humans are entirely self-interested. It is not usually thought a virtue of a theory that (...)
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  29. Hybrid Expressivism: Virtues and Vices.Mark Schroeder - 2009 - Ethics 119 (2):257-309.
    This paper is a survey of recent ‘hybrid’ approaches to metaethics, according to which moral sentences, in some sense or other, express both beliefs and desires. I try to show what kinds of theoretical issues come up at the different choice points we encounter in developing such a view, to raise some problems and explain where they come from, and to begin to get a sense for what the payoff of such views can be, and what they will need to (...)
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  30.  17
    Virtue and Nature: Christopher W. Gowans.Christopher W. Gowans - 2008 - Social Philosophy and Policy 25 (1):28-55.
    The Neo-Aristotelian ethical naturalism of Philippa Foot and Rosalind Hursthouse purports to establish a naturalistic criterion for the virtues. Specifically, by developing a parallel between the natural ends of nonhuman animals and the natural ends of human beings, they argue that character traits are justified as virtues by the extent to which they promote and do not inhibit natural ends such as self-preservation, reproduction, and the well-being of one’s social group. I argue that the approach of Foot and Hursthouse cannot (...)
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  31.  92
    Discussion of Christopher Peacocke’s A Study of Concepts. [REVIEW]David Papineau & Christopher Peacocke - 1996 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 56 (2):425.
    Christopher Peacocke’s A Study of Concepts is a dense and rewarding work. Each chapter raises many issues for discussion. I know three different people who are writing reviews of the volume. It testifies to the depth of Peacocke’s book that each reviewer is focusing on a quite different set of topics.
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  32.  3
    Christopher Braider. Experimental Selves: Person and Experience in Early Modern Europe. Xiv + 419 Pp., Illus., Notes, Bibl., Index. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2018. $67.50 (Cloth). E-Book Available. [REVIEW]Christopher Hamlin - 2020 - Isis 111 (3):671-672.
  33. What Does It Take to "Have" a Reason?Mark Schroeder - 2011 - In Andrew Reisner & Asbjørn Steglich-Petersen (eds.), Reasons for Belief. Cambridge University Press. pp. 201--22.
    forthcoming in reisner and steglich-peterson, eds., Reasons for Belief If I believe, for no good reason, that P and I infer (correctly) from this that Q, I don’t think we want to say that I ‘have’ P as evidence for Q. Only things that I believe (or could believe) rationally, or perhaps, with justification, count as part of the evidence that I have. It seems to me that this is a good reason to include an epistemic acceptability constraint on evidence (...)
     
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  34. Holism, Weight, and Undercutting.Mark Schroeder - 2011 - Noûs 45 (2):328 - 344.
    Particularists in ethics emphasize that the normative is holistic, and invite us to infer with them that it therefore defies generalization. This has been supposed to present an obstacle to traditional moral theorizing, to have striking implications for moral epistemology and moral deliberation, and to rule out reductive theories of the normative, making it a bold and important thesis across the areas of normative theory, moral epistemology, moral psychology, and normative metaphysics. Though particularists emphasize the importance of the holism of (...)
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  35. Consequentializing and its Consequences.S. Schroeder - 2017 - Philosophical Studies 174 (6):1475-1497.
    Recently, a number of philosophers have argued that we can and should “consequentialize” non-consequentialist moral theories, putting them into a consequentialist framework. I argue that these philosophers, usually treated as a group, in fact offer three separate arguments, two of which are incompatible. I show that none represent significant threats to a committed non-consequentialist, and that the literature has suffered due to a failure to distinguish these arguments. I conclude by showing that the failure of the consequentializers’ arguments has implications (...)
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  36.  23
    Christopher Gowans: Innocence Lost: An Examination of Inescapable Wrongdoing. [REVIEW]Christopher Perricone - 1998 - Journal of Value Inquiry 32 (1):127-132.
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  37.  10
    Christopher Bertram.Christopher Bertram - 2012 - In Gerald F. Gaus & Fred D'Agostino (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Social and Political Philosophy. Routledge. pp. 82.
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  38. The Very Idea of Popular Sovereignty: “We the People” Reconsidered*: CHRISTOPHER W. MORRIS.Christopher W. Morris - 2000 - Social Philosophy and Policy 17 (1):1-26.
    The sovereignty of the people, it is widely said, is the foundation of modern democracy. The truth of this claim depends on the plausibility of attributing sovereignty to “the people” in the first place, and I shall express skepticism about this possibility. I shall suggest as well that the notion of popular sovereignty is complex, and that appeals to the notion may be best understood as expressing several different ideas and ideals. This essay distinguishes many of these and suggests that (...)
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  39.  7
    Interview de Christophe Vieu, directeur de recherche au LAAS, Toulouse, le 8 décembre 2017.Christophe Vieu & Bensaude-Vincent - 2019 - Philosophia Scientiae 23:161-164.
    Plongé au cœur des nanos, Christophe Vieu souligne la diversité des secteurs touchés par l’approche nano. À l’idée d’une convergence des secteurs scientifiques, il oppose l’image d’une espèce invasive. Il se sent de ce fait investi d’une responsabilité de l’ensemble des technosciences.
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  40. Rethinking Health: Healthy or Healthier Than?S. Andrew Schroeder - 2013 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 64 (1):131-159.
    Theorists of health have, to this point, focused exclusively on trying to define a state—health—that an organism might be in. I argue that they have overlooked the possibility of a comparativist theory of health, which would begin by defining a relation—healthier than—that holds between two organisms or two possible states of the same organism. I show that a comparativist approach to health has a number of attractive features, and has important implications for philosophers of medicine, bioethicists, health economists, and policy (...)
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  41. Realism and Reduction: The Quest for Robustness.Mark Schroeder - 2005 - Philosophers' Imprint 5:1-18.
    It doesn’t seem possible to be a realist about the traditional Christian God while claiming to be able to reduce God talk in naturalistically acceptable terms. Reduction, in this case, seems obviously eliminativist. Many philosophers seem to think that the same is true of the normative—that reductive “realists” about the normative are not really realists about the normative at all, or at least, only in some attenuated sense. This paper takes on the challenge of articulating what it is that makes (...)
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  42. Doxastic Wronging.Rima Basu & Mark Schroeder - 2019 - In Brian Kim & Matthew McGrath (eds.), Pragmatic Encroachment in Epistemology. Routledge. pp. 181-205.
    In the Book of Common Prayer’s Rite II version of the Eucharist, the congregation confesses, “we have sinned against you in thought, word, and deed”. According to this confession we wrong God not just by what we do and what we say, but also by what we think. The idea that we can wrong someone not just by what we do, but by what think or what we believe, is a natural one. It is the kind of wrong we feel (...)
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  43. Schroeder on Expressivism: For – or Against? [REVIEW]Ralph Wedgwood - 2010 - Analysis 70 (1):117-129.
    This is a critical discussion of Mark Schroeder's book, "Being For: Evaluating the Semantic Program of Expressivism" (Oxford University Press, 2008).
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  44.  66
    Being For: Evaluating the Semantic Program of Expressivism * by Mark Schroeder * Clarendon Press, 2008. XVI + 198 Pp. {Pound}27.50: Summary. [REVIEW]M. Schroeder - 2010 - Analysis 70 (1):101-104.
    (No abstract is available for this citation).
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  45. Schroeder and Whiting on Knowledge and Defeat.Javier González de Prado Salas - 2016 - Logos and Episteme 7 (2):231-238.
    Daniel Whiting has argued, in this journal, that Mark Schroeder’s analysis of knowledge in terms of subjectively and objectively sufficient reasons for belief makes wrong predictions in fake barn cases. Schroeder has replied that this problem may be avoided if one adopts a suitable account of perceptual reasons. I argue that Schroeder’s reply fails to deal with the general worry underlying Whiting’s purported counterexample, because one can construct analogous potential counterexamples that do not involve perceptual reasons at (...)
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  46.  75
    Justice and the Convention on Biological Diversity.Doris Schroeder & Thomas W. Pogge - 2009 - Ethics and International Affairs 23 (3):267-280.
    Abstract Benefit sharing as envisaged by the 1992 Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) is a relatively new idea in international law. Within the context of non-human biological resources, it aims to guarantee the conservation of biodiversity and its sustainable use by ensuring that its custodians are adequately rewarded for its preservation. Prior to the adoption of the CBD, access to biological resources was frequently regarded as a free-for-all. Bioprospectors were able to take resources out of their natural habitat and develop (...)
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  47. Kleine Schriften von Christoph Sigwart...1.-[2.] Reihe.Christoph Sigwart - 1889 - Mohr.
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  48. What Makes Reasons Sufficient?Mark Schroeder - 2015 - American Philosophical Quarterly 52 (2):159-170.
    This paper addresses the question: ‘what makes reasons sufficient?’ and offers the answer, ‘being at least as weighty as the reasons for the alternatives’. The paper starts by introducing some of the reasons why sufficiency has seemed difficult to understand, particularly in epistemology, and some circumstantial evidence that this has contributed to more general problems in the epistemological literature. It then introduces the positive account of sufficiency, and explains how this captures sufficiency in both the practical and epistemic domains. Finally, (...)
     
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  49.  59
    Excerpts From Christopher Buckley's Article Describing His Religious Upbringing and the Part Chesterton's Book "Orthodoxy" Played in It.Christopher Buckley - 1991 - The Chesterton Review 17 (1):132-135.
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  50.  26
    Wayne Ouderkirkand Christopher J. Preston.Christopher J. Preston - 2007 - In Christopher J. Preston and Wayne Ouderkirk (ed.), Nature, Value, Duty: Life on Earth with Holmes Rolston, Iii. Springer. pp. 8.
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