Results for 'Christine M. Riordan'

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  1. Corporate Image: Employee Reactions and Implications for Managing Corporate Social Performance. [REVIEW]Christine M. Riordan, Robert D. Gatewood & JodiBarnes Bill - 1997 - Journal of Business Ethics 16 (4):401-412.
    Corporate image is a function of organizational signals which determine the perceptions of various stakeholders regarding the actions of an organization. Because of its relationship to the actions of an organization, image has been studied as an indicator of the social performance of the organization. Recent research has determined that social performance has direct effects on the behaviors and attitudes of the organization's employees. To better understand these effects, this study develops and empirically tests a model which links corporate leaders' (...)
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  2.  32
    Corporate Image: Employee Reactions and Implications for Managing Corporate Social Performance. [REVIEW]Christine M. Riordan, Robert D. Gatewood & Jodi Barnes Bill - 1997 - Journal of Business Ethics 16 (4):401 - 412.
    Corporate image is a function of organizational signals which determine the perceptions of various stakeholders regarding the actions of an organization. Because of its relationship to the actions of an organization, image has been studied as an indicator of the social performance of the organization. Recent research has determined that social performance has direct effects on the behaviors and attitudes of the organization's employees. To better understand these effects, this study develops and empirically tests a model which links corporate leaders' (...)
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  3. The Constitution of Agency: Essays on Practical Reason and Moral Psychology.Christine M. Korsgaard - 2008 - Oxford University Press.
    Christine M. Korsgaard is one of today's leading moral philosophers: this volume collects ten influential papers by her on practical reason and moral psychology ...
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  4. The Sources of Normativity.Christine M. Korsgaard - 1996 - Cambridge University Press.
    Ethical concepts are, or purport to be, normative. They make claims on us: they command, oblige, recommend, or guide. Or at least when we invoke them, we make claims on one another; but where does their authority over us - or ours over one another - come from? Christine Korsgaard identifies four accounts of the source of normativity that have been advocated by modern moral philosophers: voluntarism, realism, reflective endorsement, and the appeal to autonomy. She traces their history, showing (...)
  5. Creating the Kingdom of Ends.Christine M. Korsgaard - 1996 - Cambridge University Press.
    Christine Korsgaard has become one of the leading interpreters of Kant's moral philosophy. She is identified with a small group of philosophers who are intent on producing a version of Kant's moral philosophy that is at once sensitive to its historical roots while revealing its particular relevance to contemporary problems. She rejects the traditional picture of Kant's ethics as a cold vision of the moral life which emphasises duty at the expense of love and value. Rather, Kant's work is (...)
  6.  96
    Self-Constitution: Agency, Identity, and Integrity.Christine M. Korsgaard - 2009 - Oxford University Press.
    Agency and identity -- Necessitation -- Acts and actions -- Aristotle and Kant -- Agency and practical identity -- The metaphysics of normativity -- Constitutive standards -- The constitution of life -- In defense of teleology -- The paradox of self-constitution -- Formal and substantive principles of reason -- Formal versus substantive -- Testing versus weighing -- Maximizing and prudence -- Practical reason and the unity of the will -- The empiricist account of normativity -- The rationalist account of normativity (...)
  7. Fellow Creatures: Kantian Ethics and Our Duties to Animals.Christine M. Korsgaard - unknown
    Christine M. Korsgaard is Arthur Kingsley Porter Professor of Philosophy at Harvard University. She was educated at the University of Illinois and received a Ph.D. from Harvard. She has held positions at Yale, the University of California at Santa Barbara, and the University of Chicago, and visiting positions at Berkeley and UCLA. She is a member of the American Philosophical Association and a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She has published extensively on Kant, and about (...)
     
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  8. Marilynn Desmond, Ed., Christine de Pizan and the Categories of Difference.(Medieval Cultures, 14.) Minneapolis and London: University of Minnesota Press, 1998. Pp. Xix, 287; 41 Black-and-White Figures and 1 Table. $57.95 (Cloth); $22.95 (Paper). [REVIEW]Christine M. Reno - 2000 - Speculum 75 (1):171-173.
     
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  9.  7
    Quality Enhancement Teams as an Agent for Change.Christine M. Abbott - 2000 - Perspectives: Policy and Practice in Higher Education 4 (1):16-20.
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  10. Christine M. Korsgaard, The Sources of Normativity.M. Dhanda - forthcoming - Radical Philosophy.
     
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  11. The Normativity of Instrumental Reason.Christine M. Korsgaard - 1997 - In Garrett Cullity & Berys Gaut (eds.), Ethics and Practical Reason. Oxford: Clarendon Press.
    This paper criticizes two accounts of the normativity of practical principles: the empiricist account and the rationalist or realist account. It argues against the empiricist view, focusing on the Humean texts that are usually taken to be its locus classicus. It then argues both against the dogmatic rationalist view, and for the Kantian view, through a discussion of Kant's own remarks about instrumental rationality in the second section of the Groundwork. It further argues that the instrumental principle cannot stand alone. (...)
     
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  12. From Duty and for the Sake of the Noble: Kant and Aristotle on Morally Good Action.Christine M. Korsgaard - 1996 - In Stephen Engstrom & Jennifer Whiting (eds.), Aristotle, Kant, and the Stoics: Rethinking Happiness and Duty. Cambridge University Press.
    Aristotle believes that an agent lacks virtue unless she enjoys the performance of virtuous actions, while Kant claims that the person who does her duty despite contrary inclinations exhibits a moral worth that the person who acts from inclination lacks. Despite these differences, this chapter argues that Aristotle and Kant share a distinctive view of the object of human choice and locus of moral value: that what we choose, and what has moral value, are not mere acts, but actions: acts (...)
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  13. Personal Identity and the Unity of Agency: A Kantian Response to Parfit.Christine M. Korsgaard - 1989 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 18 (2):103-31.
  14. The Right to Lie: Kant on Dealing with Evil.Christine M. Korsgaard - 1986 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 15 (4):325-349.
    One of the great difficulties with Kant’s moral philosophy is that it seems to imply that our moral obligations leave us powerless in the face of evil. Kant’s theory sets a high ideal of conduct and tells us to live up to that ideal regardless of what other persons are doing. The results may be very bad. But Kant says that the law "remains in full force, because it commands categorically" (G, 438-39/57).* The most weI1—known example of...
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  15.  29
    Skepticism About Practical Reason.Christine M. Korsgaard - 1986 - Journal of Philosophy 83 (1):5-25.
  16. The Activity of Reason.Christine M. Korsgaard - 2009 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 83 (2):23 - 43.
    Then you have a look around, and see that none of the uninitiated are listening to us—I mean the people who think that nothing exists but what they can grasp with both hands; people who refuse to admit that actions and processes and the invisible world in general have any place in reality.
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  17. Skepticism About Practical Reason.Christine M. Korsgaard - 1986 - Journal of Philosophy 83 (1):5-25.
    Content skepticism about practical reason is doubt about the bearing of rational considerations on the activities of deliberation and choice. Motivational skepticism is doubt about the scope of reason as a motive. Some people think that motivational considerations alone provide grounds for skepticism about the project of founding ethics on practical reason. I will argue, against this view, that motivational skepticism must always be based on content skepticism. I will not address the question of whether or not content skepticism is (...)
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  18. Kant's Formula of Universal Law.Christine M. Korsgaard - 1985 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 66 (1-2):24-47.
  19. Two Distinctions in Goodness.Christine M. Korsgaard - 1983 - Philosophical Review 92 (2):169-195.
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    Fellow Creatures. Our Obligations to the Other Animals.Christine M. Korsgaard - 2018 - Zeitschrift für Philosophische Forschung 73 (1):165-168.
  21. The Claims of Animals and the Needs of Strangers: Two Cases of Imperfect Right.Christine M. Korsgaard - 2018 - Journal of Practical Ethics 6 (1):19-51.
    This paper argues for a conception of the natural rights of non-human animals grounded in Kant’s explanation of the foundation of human rights. The rights in question are rights that are in the first instance held against humanity collectively speaking—against our species conceived as an organized body capable of collective action. The argument proceeds by first developing a similar case for the right of every human individual who is in need of aid to get it, and then showing why the (...)
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  22. The Right to Lie: Kant on Dealing with Evil.Christine M. Korsgaard - 1998 - In James Rachels (ed.), Ethical Theory 2: Theories About How We Should Live. Oxford University Press.
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  23.  4
    Feminist Relational Theory: The Significance of Oppression and Structures of Power: A Commentary on "Nondomination and the Limits of Relational Autonomy" by Danielle M. Wenner.Christine M. Koggel - 2020 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 13 (2):49-55.
    Danielle Wenner has crafted novel arguments in defense of republican accounts of freedom. I learned a lot from her discussion of how Philip Pettit's neorepublican account of freedom as nondomination does a better job than standard accounts of freedom as noninterference of explaining how power over an agent can restrict their freedom to act autonomously. The real crux of Wenner's argument, however, is that freedom as nondomination can do this work in a way that those who defend an account of (...)
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  24. Insert Instruction Here: The Impact of the Service Model on Authentic Teaching.Christine M. Moeller - 2020 - In Veronica Arellano Douglas & Joanna Gadsby (eds.), Deconstructing service in libraries: intersections of identities and expectations. Litwin Books.
     
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  25. The Relational Nature of the Good.Christine M. Korsgaard - 2013 - Oxford Studies in Metaethics 8:1.
  26. Realism and Constructivism in Twentieth-Century Moral Philosophy.Christine M. Korsgaard - 2003 - Journal of Philosophical Research 28 (Supplement):99-122.
    In this paper I trace the development of one of the central debates of late twentieth-century moral philosophy—the debate between realism and what Rawls called “constructivism.” Realism, I argue, is a reactive position that arises in response to almost every attempt to give a substantive explanation of morality. It results from the realist’s belief that such explanations inevitably reduce moral phenomena to natural phenomena. I trace this belief, and the essence of realism, to a view about the nature of concepts—that (...)
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  27. Newtonianism in Scottish Universities in the Seventeenth Century.Christine M. Shepherd - 1982 - In Campbell & Skinner (ed.), The Origins and Nature of the Scottish Enlightenment. pp. 65--85.
  28. The Reasons We Can Share: An Attack on the Distinction Between Agent-Relative and Agent-Neutral Values.Christine M. Korsgaard - 1993 - Social Philosophy and Policy 10 (1):24-51.
    To later generations, much of the moral philosophy of the twentieth century will look like a struggle to escape from utilitarianism. We seem to succeed in disproving one utilitarian doctrine, only to find ourselves caught in the grip of another. I believe that this is because a basic feature of the consequentialist outlook still pervades and distorts our thinking: the view that the business of morality is to bring something about . Too often, the rest of us have pitched our (...)
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  29. Aristotle on Function and Virtue.Christine M. Korsgaard - 1986 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 3 (3):259 - 279.
  30. Constitutivism and the Virtues.Christine M. Korsgaard - 2019 - Philosophical Explorations 22 (2):98-116.
    In Self-Constitution, I argue that the principles governing action are “constitutive standards” of agency, standards that arise from the nature of agency itself. To be an agent is to be autonomousl...
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  31.  59
    Perspectives on Equality: Constructing a Relational Theory.Christine M. Koggel - 1997 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Beginning with liberalism's foundational idea of moral equality as the basis for treating people with equal concern and respect, Christine Koggel offers a modified account of what makes human beings equal and what is needed to achieve equality. Koggel utilizes insights from care ethics but switches the focus from care as a moral response within personal relationships to the broader network of relationships within which care is given or withheld. The result is an account of moral personhood and agency (...)
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  32. Self-Constitution in the Ethics of Plato and Kant.Christine M. Korsgaard - 1999 - The Journal of Ethics 3 (1):1-29.
    Plato and Kant advance a constitutional model of the soul, in which reason and appetite or passion have different structural and functional roles in the generation of motivation, as opposed to the familiar Combat Model in which they are portrayed as independent sources of motivation struggling for control. In terms of the constitutional model we may explain what makes an action different from an event. What makes an action attributable to a person, and therefore what makes it an action, is (...)
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  33. The General Point of View: Love and Moral Approval in Hume's Ethics.Christine M. Korsgaard - 1999 - Hume Studies 25 (1-2):3-42.
    Hume thinks moral judgments are based on sentiments of approval and disapproval we feel when we contemplate someone from a "general point of view." We view her through the eyes of her "narrow circle" and judge her in accordance with general rules. Why do we take up the general point of view? Hume also argues that approval is a calm form of love, love of character, which sets a normative standard for other forms of love. In this paper I explain (...)
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  34. Autonomy and the Second Person Within: A Commentary on Stephen Darwall’s The Second‐Person Standpoint.Christine M. Korsgaard - 2007 - Ethics 118 (1):8-23.
  35. Kant's Formula of Humanity.Christine M. Korsgaard - 1986 - Kant Studien 77 (1-4):183-202.
  36.  7
    Christine M. Korsgaard Interview.Julian Baggini - 2012 - The Philosophers' Magazine 58:60-69.
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  37. Creating the Kingdom of Ends: Reciprocity and Responsibility in Personal Relations.Christine M. Korsgaard - 1992 - Philosophical Perspectives 6:305-332.
  38. Acting for a Reason.Christine M. Korsgaard - 2005 - Danish Yearbook of Philosophy 40 (1):11-35.
    The use of the English word “reason” in all of these contexts, and the way we translate equivalent terms from other languages, suggests a connection, but what exactly is it? Aristotle and Kant’s conception of what practical reasons are, I believe, can help us to answer this question, by bringing out what is distinctive, and distinctively active, about acting for a reason. That, at least, is what I am going to argue.
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  39. Personhood, animals, and the law.Christine M. Korsgaard - 2013 - Think 12 (34):25-32.
    ExtractThe idea that all the entities in the world may be, for legal and moral purposes, divided into the two categories of ‘persons’ and ‘things’ comes down to us from the tradition of Roman law. In the law, a ‘person’ is essentially the subject of rights and obligations, while a thing may be owned as property. In ethics, a person is an object of respect, to be valued for her own sake, and never to be used as a mere means (...)
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  40. Aristotle and Kant on the Source of Value.Christine M. Korsgaard - 1986 - Ethics 96 (3):486-505.
    Kant holds that the good will is a source of value, In the sense that other things acquire their values from standing in an appropriate relation to it. I argue that aristotle holds a similar view about contemplation, And that this explains his preference for the contemplative life. They differ about what the source of value is because they differ about which kind of activity, ethical or contemplative, discovers meaning and purpose in the world.
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  41.  18
    Christine M. Korsgaard.Kenneth Baynes - 1989 - The Monist 72 (3).
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  42. Kantian Ethics, Animals, and the Law.Christine M. Korsgaard - 2013 - Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 33 (4):629-648.
    Legal systems divide the world into persons and property, treating animals as property. Some animal rights advocates have proposed treating animals as persons. Another option is to introduce a third normative category. This raises questions about how normative categories are established. In this article I argue that Kant established normative categories by determining what the presuppositions of rational practice are. According to Kant, rational choice presupposes that rational beings are ends in themselves and the rational use of the earth’s resources (...)
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  43.  40
    Epistemic Injustice in a Settler Nation: Canada’s History of Erasing, Silencing, Marginalizing.Christine M. Koggel - 2018 - Journal of Global Ethics 14 (2):240-251.
    ABSTRACTThis paper examines an application of epistemic injustice not fully explored in the literature. How does epistemic injustice function in broader contexts of relationships within countries between colonizers and colonized? More specifically, what can be learned about the ongoing structural aspects of hermeneutical injustice in Canada’s settler history of the forced assimilation of Indigenous peoples and the resultant erasing and marginalizing of Indigenous histories, languages, laws, traditions, and practices? In this paper, I use insights from Canada’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission (...)
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  44. Weaving the Sermon: Preaching in a Feminist Perspective.Christine M. Smith - 1989
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  45. Facing the Animal You See in the Mirror.Christine M. Korsgaard - 2009 - The Harvard Review of Philosophy 16 (1):4-9.
    A contribution to a panel on ethics and animals forthcoming in The Harvard Review of Philosophy.
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  46.  19
    The Standpoint of Practical Reason.Christine M. Korsgaard - 1990 - Garland.
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  47. Conscience.Christine M. Korsgaard - unknown
    Conscience is the psychological faculty by which we aware of and respond to the moral character of our own actions. It is most commonly thought of as the source of pains we suffer as a result of doing what we believe is wrong --- the pains of guilt, or “pangs of conscience.” It may also be seen, more controversially, as the source of our knowledge of what is right and wrong, or as a motive for moral conduct. Thus a person (...)
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  48.  10
    Christine M. Korsgaard, The Constitution of Agency: Essays on Practical Reason and Moral Psychology Reviewed By.Christian Perring - 2010 - Philosophy in Review 30 (2):109-110.
  49. Natural Motives and the Motive of Duty: Hume and Kant on Our Duties to Others.Christine M. Korsgaard - manuscript
    In this paper I argue that the ground of this disagreement is different than philosophers have traditionally supposed. On the surface, the disagreement appears to be a matter of substantive moral judgment: Hume admires the sort of person who rushes to the aid of another from motives of sympathy or humanity, while Kant thinks that a person who helps with the thought that it is his duty is the better character. While a moral disagreement of this kind certainly follows from (...)
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  50.  46
    Critical Thinking Development in Service-Learning Activities: Pedagogical Implications for Critical Being and Action.Christine M. Cress - 2003 - Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines 23 (1/2):87-93.
    This study investigated student development of critical thinking skills in senior-level service-Iearning courses. The methodology included a pre- and post-test design. Findings indicate that facilitating critical thinking as a function of developing critically engaged students is related to the pedagogical types of course content, discussions, and activities.
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