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Cheryl Anne Cox [7]Cheryl Cox [1]
  1.  7
    Sisters, Daughters and the Deme of Marriage: A Note.Cheryl Anne Cox - 1988 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 108:185-188.
    With the publication recently of two valuable studies on Attic demes, we are now more fully aware of what we know, and do not know, of the deme. With Osborne's work, we now have some idea of the tendency of Athenians to own and maintain property in the deme of origin, but the role of marriage in consolidating property in that deme is more difficult to assess. In contrast to Osborne's focus on the ancestral deme, this brief study will concentrate (...)
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  2.  7
    Hipponicus' Trapeza: humour in Andocides 1.130–1.Cheryl Anne Cox - 1996 - Classical Quarterly 46 (02):572-.
    Andocides is generally not considered one of the best orators. To point up his flawed style, scholars have discussed a notoriously vindictive and humorous section in Andocides 1: in 124ff. Andocides describes the profligate lifestyle of his prosecutor, Callias III the Ceryx, the son of Hipponicus II and dadouchos of the Eleusinian Mysteries.
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  3.  10
    The Family in Greek History (Review).Cheryl Anne Cox - 2000 - American Journal of Philology 121 (1):153-155.
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  4.  10
    The Astynomoi, Private Wills and Street Activity.Cheryl Anne Cox - 2007 - Classical Quarterly 57 (02):769-775.
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  5.  11
    Modified Informed Consent in a Viral Seroprevalence Study in the Caribbean.Cheryl Cox & C. N. L. MacPherson - 1996 - Bioethics 10 (3):222-232.
    An unlinked seroprevalence study of HIV and other viruses was conducted on pregnant women on the Caribbean island of Grenada in 1994. Investigators were from both the developed world and the Grenadian Ministry of Health . There was then no board on Grenada to protect research subjects or review ethical aspects of studies. Nurses from the MOH were asked to verbally inform their patients about the study, and request that patients become subjects of the study and give blood for screening. (...)
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