8 found
Order:
Disambiguations
Charles K. Fink [13]Charles Kedric Fink [2]
See also
Charles K. Fink
Miami Dade College
  1.  34
    The Predation Argument.Charles K. Fink - 2005 - Between the Species 13 (5):1-15.
    One common objection to ethical vegetarianism—that is, vegetarianism for ethical reasons—concerns the morality of the predator-prey relationship. If it is morally acceptable for wolves to kill sheep for food, why is it wrong for human beings to eat meat? The objection raised here is sometimes called the “predation argument.” In this article, I critically examine three versions of the argument.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  2.  73
    The ‘Scent’ of a Self: Buddhism and the First-Person Perspective.Charles K. Fink - 2012 - Asian Philosophy 22 (3):289-306.
    Buddhism famously denies the existence of the self. This is usually understood to mean that Buddhism denies the existence of a substantial self existing over and above the flow of conscious experience. But what of the purely experiential self accepted by the phenomenological tradition? Does Buddhism deny the reflexive or first-personal character of conscious experience? In this paper, I argue that even the notion of an experiential self is ultimately incompatible with Buddhist teaching—in fact, deeply incompatible. According to Buddhism, I (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  3. Acting with Good Intentions: Virtue Ethics and the Principle That Ought Implies Can.Charles K. Fink - 2020 - Journal of Philosophical Research 45:79-95.
    In Morals from Motives, Michael Slote proposed an agent-based approach to virtue ethics in which the morality of an action derives solely from the agent’s motives. Among the many objections that have been raised against Slote’s account, this article addresses two problems associated with the Kantian principle that ought implies can. These are the problems of “deficient” and “inferior” motivation. These problems arise because people cannot freely choose their motives. We cannot always choose to act from good motives; nor can (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  47
    Clinging to Nothing: The Phenomenology and Metaphysics of Upādāna in Early Buddhism.Charles K. Fink - 2015 - Asian Philosophy 25 (1):15-33.
    The concept of clinging is absolutely central to early Buddhist thought. This article examines the concept from both a phenomenological and a metaphysical perspective and attempts to understand how it relates to the non-self doctrine and to the ultimate goal of Nibbāna. Unenlightened consciousness is consciousness centered on an ‘I’. It is also consciousness that is conditioned by and bound up with a being in the world. From a phenomenological perspective, clinging gives birth to the illusion of self, or what (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  5.  25
    Nonviolence and Tolstoy’s Hard Question.Charles K. Fink - 2019 - The Acorn 17 (2):101-117.
    Pacifists are often put on the defensive with cases—real or imagined—in which innocent people are threatened by violent criminals. Is it always wrong to respond to violence with violence, even in defense of the innocent? This is the “hard” question addressed in this article. I argue that it is at least permissible to maintain one’s commitment to nonviolence in such cases. This may not seem like a bold conclusion, yet pacifists are often ridiculed—sometimes as cowards, sometimes as selfish moral purists—for (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  21
    Moral Reasons: An Introduction to Ethics and Critical Thinking.Charles K. Fink - 2017 - Lanham Maryland, USA: Hamilton Books.
    Distinguished by its readability and scope, Moral Reasons analyzes issues in moral and political philosophy with careful attention to the role of argumentation in the study of ethics. After a comprehensive overview of moral reasoning--including dozens of examples and exercises--Charles K. Fink guides readers through the theories and arguments of philosophers from Plato to Peter Singer, covering such diverse topics as moral skepticism, abortion, euthanasia, political authority, punishment and war. Ideal as a main text for courses on applied ethics or (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  87
    Animal Experimentation and the Argument From Limited Resources.Charles K. Fink - 1991 - Between the Species 7 (2):90-95.
    Animal rights activists are often accused of caring more about animals than about human beings. How, it is asked, can activists condemn the use of animals in biomedical research—research that improves human health and saves human lives? In this article, I argue that even if animal experimentation might eventually provide cures for many serious diseases, given the present state of the world, we are not justified supporting this research; rather, we ought to devote our limited resources to other forms of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  8.  10
    Animals and the Ethics of Domination.Charles K. Fink - 2006 - Between the Species 13 (6):1-9.
    The ethics of domination—that “might makes right”—involves essentially two components: first, the judgment that one group, the dominate group, is superior to another group, the subordinate group; and second, the moral principle that the superior group has the right to dominate—to control, exploit, subjugate, exterminate, even devour—the inferior group. Together these two claims provide a moral justification for domination— the domination of one culture by another, one gender by another, one socio-economic class by another, one species by another. My aim (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark