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Charles A. Hobbs [11]Charles Hobbs [1]
  1.  23
    The Intertwining of Culture and Nature: Franz Boas, John Dewey, and Deweyan Strands of American Anthropology.Gabriel Alejandro Torres Colόn & Charles A. Hobbs - 2015 - Journal of the History of Ideas 76 (1):139-162.
  2.  31
    Naturalism, death, and functional immortality.Charles A. Hobbs - 2009 - Contemporary Pragmatism 6 (1):39-65.
    I consider a naturalistic approach to death, seeking a naturalistic or “functional” version of immortality. Making use of John Dewey and some other classical American philosophers, I first articulate the naturalism of this project. I then discuss what such naturalism means for understanding the self and its survival. Finally, I consider the existential question about to what extent such a view of immortality is satisfying.
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  3.  40
    Toward a Pragmatist Anthropology of Race.Gabriel Alejandro Torres Colón & Charles A. Hobbs - 2016 - The Pluralist 11 (1):126-135.
    As we have discussed elsewhere, Franz Boas and John Dewey were intellectual and political allies at Columbia University for over thirty years.1 Dewey advocated for an increased role of anthropology for philosophical insight, and he often used anthropological knowledge as a starting point for his ethics and politics, including such knowledge as learned from Boas. We hold that Boas and Dewey shared a common core understanding of human global and evolutionary diversity, and that this shared understanding itself forms a core (...)
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  4.  26
    Dewey: A Beginner’s Guide.Charles A. Hobbs - 2011 - The Pluralist 6 (2):57-61.
    This book is a clear, engaging, and ambitious introduction to the philosophy of John Dewey. First, a comment about the subtitle: while I recognize that it reflects the book’s inclusion in a series of “beginner’s guides,” the subtitle (“a beginner’s guide”) is unfortunate. The book is much more than that, and, as such, it is more valuable than the subtitle suggests. It is clearly of help to people new to Dewey, and yet it is also a significant resource for those (...)
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  5.  26
    Dewey: A Beginner’s Guide.Charles A. Hobbs - 2011 - The Pluralist 6 (2):57-61.
  6.  41
    Dewey, Wittgenstein, and Contextualist Epistemology.Charles A. Hobbs - 2008 - Southwest Philosophy Review 24 (2):71-85.
  7.  13
    John Dewey's Quest for Unity: The Journey of a Promethean Mystic (review).Charles A. Hobbs - 2011 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 25 (4):428-430.
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  8. Pragmatism, Radical Empiricism, and Mounce's Account of William James.Charles Hobbs - 2007 - William James Studies 2.
    According to H.O. Mounce, James's pragmatism is a failure simply for being inconsistent with that of C.S. Peirce. Mounce also dismisses James's radical empiricism as involving phenomenalism. There are significant inaccuracies with such a view of James, and, accordingly, this paper is a response to Mounce. The two themes of radical empiricism and pragmatism constitute the heart of William James's philosophical project, and at least for this reason alone I think it important to correct Mounce. In short, his indictment of (...)
     
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  9.  11
    Reconsidering John Dewey’s Relationship with Ancient Philosophy.Charles A. Hobbs - 2013 - International Philosophical Quarterly 53 (3):325-336.
    There has been little scholarly attention to the tension within Dewey’s comments on the ancients. On the one hand, Dewey’s polemics condemn the lasting influence of Greek philosophers as deleterious. He charges the Greeks with originating a quest (“the quest for certainty”) that has led Western philosophy into such dualisms as reason and emotion, mind and nature, individual and community, and theory and practice. On the other hand, Dewey often has many sympathetic things to say about the Greeks. Taking account (...)
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  10.  21
    Unmodern Philosophy and Modern Philosophy John Dewey.Charles A. Hobbs - 2013 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 49 (1):122.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Reviewed by:Unmodern Philosophy and Modern Philosophy by John DeweyCharles A. HobbsJohn Dewey. Unmodern Philosophy and Modern Philosophy. Carbondale and Edwardsville: Southern Illinois University Press, 2012, 351 pp., index.John Dewey’s latest publication marks a watershed moment for scholarship in American philosophy, and, in addition to Dewey himself, we have editor Phillip Deen to thank for discovering it (among the Dewey papers in Special Collections at Morris Library of Southern Illinois (...)
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  11.  56
    Why Classical American Pragmatism is Helpful for Thinking about Death.Charles A. Hobbs - 2011 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 47 (2):182-195.
    We pragmatists have within our tradition significant methodological resources for contributing to the understanding of the meaning of beliefs about the nature of death—a topic that has still not received enough attention. 1 I want here to articulate what crucial features of pragmatism I believe to be especially helpful for such a contribution, and to explain something about why they are helpful in this regard. As my title indicates, I am not drawing upon the neo-pragmatism of those such as Richard (...)
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