Results for 'Charles G. Levine'

996 found
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  1.  98
    Trends in Memory Development Research.Lawrence Kohlberg, Charles G. Levine & Alexandra Hewer - 1983 - S Karger.
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  2.  33
    Imagination Inflation: Imagining a Childhood Event Inflates Confidence that it Occurred.Charles G. Manning & Elizabeth F. Loftus - unknown
    Counterfactual imaginings are known to have far reaching implications. In the present experiment, we ask if imagining events from one's past can affect memory for childhood events. We draw on the social psychology literature showing that imagining a future event increases the subjective likelihood that the event will occur. The concepts of cognitive availability and the source monitoring framework provide reasons to expect that imagination may inflate confidence that a childhood event occurred. However, people routinely produce myriad counterfactual imaginings (i.e., (...)
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  3. Conditionals, probability, and nontriviality.Charles G. Morgan & Edwin D. Mares - 1995 - Journal of Philosophical Logic 24 (5):455-467.
    We show that the implicational fragment of intuitionism is the weakest logic with a non-trivial probabilistic semantics which satisfies the thesis that the probabilities of conditionals are conditional probabilities. We also show that several logics between intuitionism and classical logic also admit non-trivial probability functions which satisfy that thesis. On the other hand, we also prove that very weak assumptions concerning negation added to the core probability conditions with the restriction that probabilities of conditionals are conditional probabilities are sufficient to (...)
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  4.  30
    Kim on deductive explanation.Charles G. Morgan - 1970 - Philosophy of Science 37 (3):434-439.
    In [2] Hempel and Oppenheim give a definition of “explanation” for a certain formal language. In [1] Eberle, Kaplan, and Montague prove five theorems demonstrating that the Hempel and Oppenheim definition is not restrictive enough. In [3] Kim proposes two further conditions to supplement the Hempel and Oppenheim definition in order to avoid the objections posed in [1]. In this paper it is shown that the definition of Hempel and Oppenheim supplemented by Kim's conditions is open to a trivialization very (...)
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  5.  16
    Problems from Locke.Charles G. Werner - 1978 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 38 (4):591-592.
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  6.  31
    Introduction.Charles G. Morgan - 1993 - Studia Logica 52 (2):iii-iii.
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  7.  55
    There is a probabilistic semantics for every extension of classical sentence logic.Charles G. Morgan - 1982 - Journal of Philosophical Logic 11 (4):431 - 442.
  8.  52
    The origin and use of positional frames of reference in motor control.Anatol G. Feldman & Mindy F. Levin - 1995 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (4):723-744.
    A hypothesis about sensorimotor integration (the λ model) is described and applied to movement control and kinesthesia. The central idea is that the nervous system organizes positional frames of reference for the sensorimotor apparatus and produces active movements by shifting the frames in terms of spatial coordinates. Kinematic and electromyographic patterns are not programmed, but emerge from the dynamic interaction among the system s components, including external forces within the designated frame of reference. Motoneuronal threshold properties and proprioceptive inputs to (...)
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  9.  30
    On two proposed models of explanation.Charles G. Morgan - 1972 - Philosophy of Science 39 (1):74-81.
  10.  87
    A randomized trial of ethics education for medical house officers.D. P. Sulmasy, G. Geller, D. M. Levine & R. R. Faden - 1993 - Journal of Medical Ethics 19 (3):157-163.
    We report the results of a randomized trial to assess the impact of an innovative ethics curriculum on the knowledge and confidence of 85 medical house officers in a university hospital programme, as well as their responses to a simulated clinical case. Twenty-five per cent of the house officers received a lecture series, 25 per cent received lectures and case conferences, with an ethicist in attendance, and 50 per cent served as controls. A post-intervention questionnaire was administered. Knowledge scores did (...)
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  11.  48
    Omer on scientific explanation.Charles G. Morgan - 1973 - Philosophy of Science 40 (1):110-117.
  12. Agrippa and the crisis of Renaissance thought.Charles G. Nauert - 1972 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 162:163-165.
     
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  13.  44
    Simple probabilistic semantics for propositional k, t, b, s4, and S.Charles G. Morgan - 1982 - Journal of Philosophical Logic 11 (4):443 - 458.
  14.  16
    Annual Meeting of the Society for Exact Philosophy.Charles G. Morgan - 1992 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 57 (2):749-749.
  15.  52
    Liberated Brouwerian Modal Logic.Charles G. Morgan - 1974 - Dialogue 13 (3):505-514.
  16.  94
    Systems of modal logic for impossible worlds.Charles G. Morgan - 1973 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 16 (1-4):280 – 289.
    The intuitive notion behind the usual semantics of most systems of modal logic is that of ?possible worlds?. Loosely speaking, an expression is necessary if and only if it holds in all possible worlds; it is possible if and only if it holds in some possible world. Of course, contradictory expressions turn out to hold in no possible worlds, and logically true expressions turn out to hold in every possible world. A method is presented for transforming standard modal systems into (...)
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  17. Probabilistic semantics for orthologic and quantum logic.Charles G. Morgan - 1983 - Logique Et Analyse 26 (103-104):323-339.
     
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  18. The nature of nonmonotonic reasoning.Charles G. Morgan - 2000 - Minds and Machines 10 (3):321-360.
    Conclusions reached using common sense reasoning from a set of premises are often subsequently revised when additional premises are added. Because we do not always accept previous conclusions in light of subsequent information, common sense reasoning is said to be nonmonotonic. But in the standard formal systems usually studied by logicians, if a conclusion follows from a set of premises, that same conclusion still follows no matter how the premise set is augmented; that is, the consequence relations of standard logics (...)
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  19.  9
    Progress toward the statistical and psychological significance of expectancy effects.Charles G. Stewart - 1978 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (3):406-408.
  20.  40
    Control variables in movement production: An experimentally derived concept.Anatol G. Feldman & Mindy F. Levin - 1997 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (4):773-773.
    The basic concepts of motor control formulated in our target article were derived from specific experiments, a fact which is disregarded in Dalenoort's comments. A purely academic approach to motor control may not result in a clearer understanding of control concepts.
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  21.  16
    Grasping cerebellar function depends on our understanding the principles of sensorimotor integration: The frame of reference hypothesis.Anatol G. Feldman & Mindy F. Levin - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (3):442-445.
    The cerebellum probably obeys the rules of sensorimotor integration common in the nervous system. One such a rule is formulated: the nervous system organizes spatial frames of reference for the sensorimotor apparatus and produces voluntary movements by shifting their origin points. We give examples of spatial frames of reference for different single- and multi-joint movements including locomotion and also illustrate that the process of motor development and learning may depend critically on the formation of appropriate frames of reference and the (...)
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  22.  15
    Looking for Los Angeles: Architecture, Film, Photography, and the Urban Landscape.Charles G. Salas & Michael S. Roth (eds.) - 2001 - Getty Research Institute.
    The twelve contributors to Looking for Los Angeles focus on dramatic shifts in the urban landscape, important moments in the city's architectural history, and the role of the image in this mecca of image makers.
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  23.  20
    The RNA dreamtime.Charles G. Kurland - 2010 - Bioessays 32 (10):866-871.
    Modern cells present no signs of a putative prebiotic RNA world. However, RNA coding is not a sine qua non for the accumulation of catalytic polypeptides. Thus, cellular proteins spontaneously fold into active structures that are resistant to proteolysis. The law of mass action suggests that binding domains are stabilized by specific interactions with their substrates. Random polypeptide synthesis in a prebiotic world has the potential to initially produce only a very small fraction of polypeptides that can fold spontaneously into (...)
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  24.  87
    Modality, analogy, and ideal experiments according to C. S. Peirce.Charles G. Morgan - 1979 - Synthese 41 (1):65 - 83.
  25. Half-hours with great scientists.Charles G. Fraser - 1948 - New York,: Reinhold.
     
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  26.  12
    What tangled web: barriers to rampant horizontal gene transfer.Charles G. Kurland - 2005 - Bioessays 27 (7):741-747.
    Dawkins in his The Selfish Gene(1) quite aptly applies the term “selfish” to parasitic repetitive DNA sequences endemic to eukaryotic genomes, especially vertebrates. Doolittle and Sapienza(2) as well as Orgel and Crick(3) enlivened this notion of selfish DNA with the identification of such repetitive sequences as remnants of mobile elements such as transposons. In addition, Orgel and Crick(3) associated parasitic DNA with a potential to outgrow their host genomes by propagating both vertically via conventional genome replication as well as infectiously (...)
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  27.  8
    Hypothesis generation by machine.Charles G. Morgan - 1971 - Artificial Intelligence 2 (2):179-187.
  28.  5
    State Organization and Policy Formation: The 1970 Reorganization of the Post Office Department.Charles G. Benda - 1980 - Politics and Society 9 (2):123-151.
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  29.  5
    Complex ecology: foundational perspectives on dynamic approaches to ecology and conservation.Charles G. Curtin & Timothy F. H. Allen (eds.) - 2018 - Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
    Most of us came into ecology with memories of special personal places. A cliff top that Claude Monet might have painted. Allen as a youth spent his holidays on the Dorset Coast near Swanage; he can still smell the sea breeze of his childhood. Curtin grow up on a farm in southwestern Wisconsin, the dew of the grass and the bright green on a June morning remains vivid. The catching of reptiles and insects for him awakened a curiosity about the (...)
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  30.  31
    Science and Philosophy.Charles G. Werner - 1964 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 2 (1):8-13.
  31.  38
    Biological Warfare.Charles G. Wilber - 1949 - Thought: Fordham University Quarterly 24 (2):244-254.
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  32.  60
    To Feed the Hungry.Charles G. Wilber - 1963 - Thought: Fordham University Quarterly 38 (4):487-498.
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  33. " The articular disease": Erasmus 'charges that the theologians have let the church down'.Charles G. Nauert - 1999 - Mediaevalia 22 (1999-2000):9.
     
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  34.  35
    Hiv/aids, pregnancy and reproductive autonomy: Rights and duties.Charles G. Ngwena & Rebecca J. Cook Guest Editors - 2008 - Developing World Bioethics 8 (1):iii–vi.
  35.  13
    The Nazi Doctors: Medical Killing and the Psychology of Genocide. Robert Jay Lifton.Charles G. Roland - 1989 - Isis 80 (3):555-556.
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  36.  62
    Likelihood: An Account of the Statistical Concept of Likelihood and Its Application to Scientific Inference. A. W. F. Edwards.Charles G. Morgan - 1974 - Philosophy of Science 41 (4):427-429.
  37.  18
    Phylogeny and classification of birds based on the data of DNA-DNA hybridization.Charles G. Sibley & Jon E. Ahlquist - 1983 - In R. F. Johnston (ed.), Current Ornithology. Plenum Press. pp. 245--292.
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  38.  36
    Note on a strong liberated modal logic and its relevance to possible world skepticism.Charles G. Morgan - 1979 - Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 20 (4):718-722.
  39. The Change in Huxley's Approach to the Novel of Ideas.Charles G. Hoffmann - 1961 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 42 (1):85.
     
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  40.  84
    Whitehead’s philosophy of nature and romantic poetry.Charles G. Hoffmann - 1952 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 10 (3):258-263.
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  41.  37
    Doctrine and experience: essays in American philosophy.Vincent G. Potter (ed.) - 1988 - New York: Fordham University Press.
    This collection of thirteen essays, when viewed together, offers a unique perspective on the history of American philosophy. It illuminates for the first time in book form, how thirteen major American philosophical thinkers viewed a problem of special interest in the American philosophical tradition: the relationship between experience and reflection. Written by well-known authorities on the figure about which he or she writes, the essays are arranged chronologically to highlight the changes and developments in thought from Puritanism to Pragmatism to (...)
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  42.  26
    Closing argument: At the outer Bounds of asymmetry.Charles G. Kels - 2012 - Journal of Military Ethics 11 (3):223-244.
    Abstract The increasing prevalence of armed drones in the conduct of military operations has generated robust debate. Among legal scholars, the crux of the dispute generally pits those who herald the new technology's unparalleled precision against those who view such newfound capabilities as an inducement to employ excessive force. Largely overlooked in the discussion over how drone strikes can be accomplished lawfully is a more fundamental question: Can a model of warfare that eschews any risk of harm to one party (...)
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  43.  78
    An alleged legend.Charles G. Echelbarger - 1981 - Philosophical Studies 39 (April):227-46.
  44.  29
    Local and global operators and many-valued modal logics.Charles G. Morgan - 1979 - Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 20 (2):401-411.
  45.  21
    Sentential calculus for logical falsehoods.Charles G. Morgan - 1973 - Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 14 (3):347-353.
  46.  61
    The normative sciences at work and play.Charles G. Conway - 2008 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 44 (2):pp. 288-311.
    This essay posits that Peirce puts the Normative Sciences implicitly to work at three junctures of his Neglected Argument for the Reality of God (NARG): (1) in the distinguishing of musement from play; (2) in the generation of the Humble Argument via musement; and (3) in the portrayal of the Humble Argument as the first stage of an inquiry into its confirmability. Then, focus shifts to Peirce’s notions of the initiating “play” and the “plausibility” of the God-hypothesis, as a means (...)
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  47.  50
    Weak liberated versions of T and S.Charles G. Morgan - 1975 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 40 (1):25-30.
    The usual semantics for the modal systems T, S4, and S5 assumes that the set of possible worlds contains at least one member. Recently versions of these modal systems have been developed in which this assumption is dropped. The systems discussed here are obtained by slightly weakening the liberated versions of T and S4. The semantics does not assume the existence of possible worlds, and the accessibility relation between worlds is only required to be quasi-reflexive instead of reflexive. Completeness and (...)
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  48.  42
    Probability Theory, Intuitionism, Semantics and the Dutch Book Argument.Charles G. Morgan & Hugues Leblanc - 1983 - Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 24 (3):289-304.
  49.  3
    Mental Physiology.Charles G. Wagner & Theo B. Hyslop - 1896 - Philosophical Review 5 (3):303.
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  50.  18
    Teaching Business Ethics: A Model.Charles G. Smith, Marli Gonan Božac & Morena Paulišić - 2023 - Teaching Ethics 23 (1):113-135.
    The business enterprise is a major instrument in the creation of a just society. However the tension between profit and ethicality requires sound decision making and business ethics instruction is central to creative alternatives to business leaders. Therefore, instruction is aided with a model for framing one’s thoughts about ethics and while several earlier business ethics models exist, they tend to be closed and at times parochial. This paper draws on insights from other academic disciplines to offer a broader yet (...)
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