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Catherine Cook [7]Catherine Mary Cook [2]Catherine M. Cook [2]
  1.  25
    Power distance and migrant nurses: The liminality of acculturation.Myung Suk Choi, Catherine Mary Cook & Margaret A. Brunton - 2019 - Nursing Inquiry 26 (4):e12311.
    A dearth of literature focuses on the relationship between acculturation, power distance and liminality for migrant nurses entering foreign workplaces. Expectations are for migrant nurses to be practice‐ready swiftly. However, this aspiration is naïve given the complex shifts that occur in deeply held cultural beliefs and practices and is dependent on an organisational climate of reciprocal willingness to adapt and learn. This exploratory study identified that although a plethora of literature addresses challenges migrant nurses face, there are limited data that (...)
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  2.  39
    Ethical Underpinnings of Sexuality Policies in Aged Care: Centralising Dignity.Catherine Mary Cook, Vanessa Schouten & Mark Henrickson - 2018 - Ethics and Social Welfare 12 (3):272-290.
  3.  32
    The importance of moral emotions for effective collaboration in culturally diverse healthcare teams.Catherine Cook & Margaret Brunton - 2018 - Nursing Inquiry 25 (2):e12214.
    Moral emotions shape the effectiveness of culturally diverse teams. However, these emotions, which are integral to determining ethically responsive patient care and team relationships, typically go unrecognised. The contribution of emotions to moral deliberation is subjugated within the technorational environment of healthcare decision‐making. Contemporary healthcare organisations rely on a multicultural workforce charged with the ethical care of vulnerable people. Limited extant literature examines the role of moral emotions in ethical decision‐making among culturally diverse healthcare teams. Moral emotions are evident in (...)
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  4.  11
    The sexual health consultation as a moral occasion.Catherine Cook - 2014 - Nursing Inquiry 21 (1):11-19.
    Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are socially constructed as more ‘dirty’ than other gynaecological conditions. This article analyses women’s accounts of interactions with clinicians, subsequent to a diagnosis of genital herpes simplex virus or human papilloma virus. Women conceptualised consultations as a ‘moral event,’ different from other consultations. This moral component is highlighted drawing on Foucault’s notion of ‘the confessional.’ Additionally, Douglas’ anthropological construction of ‘dirt’ is used to consider why these consultations are ‘confessional’ experiences. Email interviews were conducted with 26 (...)
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  5.  16
    Value pluralism about sexual intimacy in residential care.Vanessa Schouten, Mark Henrickson, Catherine M. Cook, Sandra MacDonald & Narges Atefi - 2023 - Nursing Ethics 30 (3):437-448.
    BackgroundThe existing literature on sexuality and intimacy in residential care tends to focus on either the question of rights, or the value of autonomy. Where the literature does reference values...
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  6.  29
    Intimacy for older adults in long-term care: a need, a right, a privilege—or a kind of care?Vanessa Schouten, Mark Henrickson, Catherine M. Cook, Sandra McDonald & Nilo Atefi - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 48 (10):723-727.
    Background To investigate attitudes of staff, residents and family members in long-term care towards sex and intimacy among older adults, specifically the extent to which they conceptualise sex and intimacy as a need, a right, a privilege or as a component of overall well-being. Methods The present study was a part of a two-arm mixed-methods cross-sectional study using a concurrent triangulation design. A validated survey tool was developed; 433 staff surveys were collected from 35 facilities across the country. Interviews were (...)
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  7.  11
    A Heideggerian analysis of good care in an acute hospital setting: Insights from healthcare workers, patients and families.Jan Dewar, Catherine Cook, Elizabeth Smythe & Deborah Spence - 2023 - Nursing Inquiry 30 (4):e12561.
    This study articulates the relational constituents of good care beyond techno‐rational competence. Neoliberal healthcare means that notions of care are readily commodified and reduced to quantifiable assessments and checklists. This novel research investigated accounts of good care provided by nursing, medical, allied and auxiliary staff. The Heideggerian phenomenological study was undertaken in acute medical‐surgical wards, investigating the contextual, communicative nature of care. The study involved interviews with 17 participants: 3 previous patients, 3 family members and 11 staff. Data were analysed (...)
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  8.  11
    Diagnostic classification, viral sexually transmitted infections and discourses of femininity: limits of normalisation to erase stigma.Catherine Cook - 2013 - Nursing Inquiry 20 (2):145-155.
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  9.  22
    Development and psychometric testing of the Clinician Readiness for Measuring Outcomes Scale.Julia Bowman, Natasha Lannin, Catherine Cook & Annie McCluskey - 2009 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 15 (1):76-84.
  10.  6
    An analysis of time conceptualisations and good care in an acute hospital setting.Jan Dewar, Catherine Cook, Elizabeth Smythe & Deborah Spence - forthcoming - Nursing Inquiry:e12613.
    This study articulates the relationship between conceptualisations of time and the accounts of good care in an acute setting. Neoliberal healthcare services, with their focus on efficiencies, predominantly calculate quality care based on time‐on‐the‐clock workforce management planning systems. However, the ways staff conceptualise and then relate to diverse meanings of time have implications for good care and for staff morale. This phenomenological study was undertaken in acute medical–surgical wards, investigating the contextual, temporal nature of care embedded in human relations. The (...)
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