Results for 'Catharine Trotter Cockburn'

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  1.  23
    Catharine Trotter Cockburn: Philosophical Writings (1702-1747).Catharine Trotter Cockburn - 2006 - Peterborough, CA: Broadview Press.
    An important thinker who contributed to eighteenth-century debates in epistemology, metaphysics, and ethics, Catharine Trotter Cockburn pursued the life of a dramatist and essayist, despite the prevailing social, cultural, and moral prescriptions of her day. Cockburn’s philosophical writings were polemical pieces in defence of such philosophers as John Locke and Samuel Clarke, in which she grappled with the moral and theological questions that concerned them and produced her own unique answers to those questions. Her works are (...)
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  2.  44
    Catharine Trotter Cockburn’s Democratization of Moral Virtue.Getty L. Lustila - 2020 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 50 (1):83-97.
    This paper examines Catharine Trotter Cockburn’s moral philosophy, focusing on her accounts of virtuous conduct, conscience, obligation, and moral character. I argue that Cockburn’s account of virtue has two interlocking parts: a view of what virtue requires of us, and a view of how we come to see this requirement as authoritative. I then argue that while the two parts are ultimately in tension with one another, the tension is instructive. I use Cockburn’s encounter with (...)
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  3.  66
    Catharine Trotter Cockburn's Defence of Locke.Jessica Gordon-Roth - 2015 - The Monist 98 (1):64-76.
    Catharine Trotter Cockburn is best known for her Defence of Mr. Locke’s Essay of Human Understanding (1702). However very little has been said about Trotter’s treatment of Locke’s metaphysical commitments therein. In this paper I give a brief description of the history of Trotter’s Defence. Thereafter I focus on two (of the many) objections to which Trotter responds on Locke’s behalf: 1) the objection that Locke has not proved the soul immortal, and 2) the (...)
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  4. Catharine Trotter Cockburn.Ruth Boeker - 2023 - Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
    This Element offers the first detailed study of Catharine Trotter Cockburn's philosophy and covers her contributions to philosophical debates in epistemology, metaphysics, moral philosophy, and philosophy of religion. It examines not only Cockburn's view that sensation and reflection are the sources of knowledge, but also how she draws attention to the limitations of human understanding and how she approaches metaphysical debates through this lens. In the area of moral philosophy, this Element argues that it is helpful (...)
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  5. Catharine Trotter Cockburn on the virtue of atheists.Jacqueline Broad - 2021 - Intellectual History Review 31 (1):111-128.
    In her Remarks Upon Some Writers (1743), Catharine Trotter Cockburn takes a seemingly radical stance by asserting that it is possible for atheists to be virtuous. In this paper, I examine whether or not Cockburn’s views concerning atheism commit her to a naturalistic ethics and a so-called radical enlightenment position on the independence of morality and religion. First, I examine her response to William Warburton’s critique of Pierre Bayle’s arguments concerning the possibility of a society of (...)
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  6. Catharine Trotter Cockburn against Theological Voluntarism.Ruth Boeker - 2024 - In Sonja Schierbaum & Jörn Müller (eds.), Varieties of Voluntarism in Medieval and Early Modern Philosophy. Routledge. pp. 251–270.
    Catharine Trotter Cockburn challenges voluntarist views held by British moral philosophers during the first half of the eighteenth century. After introducing her metaphysics of morality, namely, her account of human nature, and her account of moral motivation, which for her is a matter concerning the practice of morality, I analyze her arguments against theological voluntarism. I examine, first, how Cockburn rejects the view that God can by an arbitrary act of will change what is good or (...)
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  7. Catharine Trotter Cockburn. Filosofia morale, religione, metafisica.Emilio De Tommaso (ed.) - 2018 - Soveria Mannelli, Italy: Rubbettino.
    Catharine Trotter Cockburn (1679- 1749) fu poetessa, drammaturga e filosofa. La vivacità intellettuale e la forte determinazione le permisero di aggirare il pregiudizio di genere e di sottrarsi alle dinamiche di marginalizzazione femminile tipiche dell’età moderna. Pur celandosi dietro l’anonimato, Cockburn prese parte attiva al dibattito filosofico del tempo, intervenendo soprattutto in materia di morale. Le sue opere filosofiche, scritte in difesa di Locke o di Clarke, custodiscono, nonostante il dichiarato intento apologetico, tratti di originalità e (...)
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  8. On Catharine Trotter Cockburn's metaphysics of morality.Patricia Sheridan - 2018 - In Emily Thomas (ed.), Early Modern Women on Metaphysics. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.
  9. Catharine Trotter Cockburn on Moral Knowledge.James O. Young - 2023 - Journal of the History of Women Philosophers and Scientists 2 (1–2):46–67.
    In the wake of Locke’s Essay, empiricists faced the challenge of giving an empiricist account of the origins of moral knowledge. Locke did not rise to this challenge and relied on revelation as the source of moral knowledge. Other empiricists, including Hume and Hutcheson, opted for either emotivism or subjectivism. Clarke and others opted for rationalism and non-naturalism. In contrast, Catharine Cockburn’s meta-ethics combined Locke’s empiricism with naturalism. She held that moral good is natural good and that natural (...)
     
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  10.  15
    Catharine Trotter Cockburn: Philosophical Writings.Patricia Sheridan (ed.) - 2006 - Peterborough, CA: Broadview Press.
    An important thinker who contributed to eighteenth-century debates in epistemology, metaphysics, and ethics, Catharine Trotter Cockburn pursued the life of a dramatist and essayist, despite the prevailing social, cultural, and moral prescriptions of her day. Cockburn’s philosophical writings were polemical pieces in defence of such philosophers as John Locke and Samuel Clarke, in which she grappled with the moral and theological questions that concerned them and produced her own unique answers to those questions. Her works are (...)
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  11. Damaris Masham and Catharine Trotter Cockburn: Agency, Virtue, and Fitness in their Moral Philosophies.Patricia Sheridan - 2023 - In Karen Detlefsen & Lisa Shapiro (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Women and Early Modern European Philosophy. Routledge. pp. 506–518.
    This essay contrasts Damaris Masham and Catharine Trotter Cockburn’s respective moral philosophies. It argues that their views are both remarkably innovative, yet strikingly similar. By focusing on Masham and Cockburn’s accounts of agency and virtue, it is demonstrated that both thinkers take human nature as a sort of guide to moral behavior – i.e., it shows that the moral agent operates under the perception of moral principles as arising from human nature. While both thinkers are known (...)
     
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  12.  53
    On some footnotes to Catharine Trotter Cockburn’s Defence of the Essay Of Human Understanding.Karen Green - 2019 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 27 (4):824-841.
    ABSTRACTTwo footnotes added to the version of Catharine Cockburn’s Defence of the Essay Of Human Understanding reprinted in her Works have led to various accusations, including that s...
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  13.  33
    Catharine Trotter Cockburn.Patricia Sheridan - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  14. Locke and Catharine Trotter Cockburn.Patricia Sheridan - 2021 - In Jessica Gordon-Roth & Shelley Weinberg (eds.), The Lockean Mind. New York, NY: Routledge. pp. 27–32.
  15.  33
    On personal identity and space: some remarks on Ruth Boeker’s Catharine Trotter Cockburn.Emilio Maria De Tommaso - forthcoming - British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-9.
    Catharine Trotter Cockburn (1679–1749) was a versatile, learned lady, whose intellectual activity, both as a dramatist and as a philosopher, has been increasingly analysed by scholars in the last d...
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  16. Cockburn, Catharine Trotter.Emilio Maria De Tommaso - 2018 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Catharine Trotter Cockburn Catharine Trotter Cockburn was an active contributor to early modern philosophical discourse in England, especially regarding morality. Her philosophical production was primarily in defense of John Locke and Samuel Clarke. Nevertheless, her thinking was original and independent in many respects. Cockburn’s moral philosophy combines elements of Locke's epistemology with Clarke’s fitness … Continue reading Cockburn, Catharine Trotter →.
     
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  17.  83
    Early English Empiricism and the Work of Catharine Trotter Cockburn.Jane Duran - 2013 - Metaphilosophy 44 (4):485-495.
    This article examines the work of the seventeenth-century thinker Catharine Trotter Cockburn with an eye toward explication of her trenchant empiricism, and the foundations upon which it rested. It is argued that part of the originality of Cockburn's work has to do with her consistent line of thought with regard to evidence from the senses and the process of abstract conceptualization; in this she differed strongly from some of her contemporaries. The work of Martha Brandt Bolton (...)
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  18. Un problema metafísico en la filosofía de Catharine Trotter Cockburn: el espacio, el alma y la jerarquía de seres / A metaphysical problem in the philosophy of Catharine Trotter Cockburn: space, the soul and the hierarchy of beings.Sofía Beatriz Calvente - 2023 - Thémata Revista de Filosofía 67 (67):139-161.
    Catharine Trotter Cockburn’s metaphysics dissolves the necessary relationship between immateriality, immortality and thought. While in her youth this leads her to admit the possibility of thinking matter, in her mature work, it allows her to conceive space as non-thinking immaterial substance that links non-thinking material substance and thinking immaterial substance. To ground this conception of space, she draws on the thesis of the great chain of being. However, the possibility of thinking matter is not consistent with the (...)
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  19.  35
    Virtue, affection, and the social good: The moral philosophy of Catharine Trotter Cockburn and the Bluestockings.Patricia Sheridan - 2018 - Philosophy Compass 13 (3):e12478.
    This paper explores the intellectual relationship between three eighteenth century women thinkers: Catharine Trotter Cockburn, and the Bluestockings Elizabeth Carter and Catherine Talbot. All three share a virtue-ethical approach according to which human happiness depends on the harmonization of our essentially rational and sociable natures. The affinity between the Bluestockings and Cockburn, I show, illuminates important new avenues for thinking about the Bluestockings as philosophers in their own right and for thinking about the feminist dimensions of (...)
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  20.  32
    Catharine Trotter Cockburn: Philosophical WritingsPatricia Sheridan, editor Peterborough, ON: Broadview, 2006, 270 pp., $24.95 paper. [REVIEW]Kathy Squadrito - 2007 - Dialogue 46 (2):407-409.
  21. Watts and Trotter Cockburn on the Power of Thinking.Ruth Boeker - 2024 - In Sebastian Bender & Dominik Perler (eds.), Powers and Abilities in Early Modern Philosophy. New York, NY: Routledge.
    My chapter examines Isaac Watts’s and Catharine Trotter Cockburn’s views concerning the metaphysics of the mind and their underlying accounts of powers and substances. In Philosophical Essays on Various Subjects Watts criticizes Locke’s account of substances and argues for his own preferred account of substance. Watts argues that there is no need to postulate an unknown substratum, as Locke does. Instead, Watts searches for a better explanation of what substances are. His proposal is that bodily substance just (...)
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  22. Ruth Boeker, Catharine Trotter Cockburn, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge 2023, 75 pp. [REVIEW]Emilio M. De Tommaso - 2023 - Studi Lockiani 4:305–309.
     
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  23.  41
    "Some Reflections upon the True Grounds of Morality"- Catharine Trotter in Defence of John Locke.Emilio Maria De Tommaso - 2017 - Philosophy Study 7 (6).
    Although excluded from the standard account of the history of philosophy, Catharine Trotter Cockburn avoided the 17th-century bias against female intellectual skills and was an active contributor to the early modern philosophical discourse. In her Defence of Mr. Locke’s Essay, she defended Locke from several criticisms by Thomas Burnet. By analysing three of Burnet’s main arguments, such as the theory of natural conscience, his anti-voluntarism, and his belief in the immateriality of the soul, Trotter showed that (...)
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  24.  31
    Sameness, Persons, and the Resurrection.Anita van der Bos - 2023 - Locke Studies 23:1-19.
    According to Locke, scripture says nothing about the resurrection of the same body. We will be resurrected. But in what sense can resurrected Jane be the “same” as living Jane? Throughout his thinking, Locke holds that sameness of body and/or sameness of soul are not required for the resurrection of “the same Jane.” Sameness of person is required. Locke’s theory of personal identity was ground-breaking in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. It was provoking and resulted in a wave of critical (...)
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  25.  9
    Women Philosophers of Eighteenth-Century England: Selected Correspondence.Jacqueline Broad (ed.) - 2019 - Oxford University Press: New York.
    This is the second of two collections of correspondence written by early modern English women philosophers. In this volume, Jacqueline Broad presents letters from three influential thinkers of the eighteenth century: Mary Astell, Elizabeth Thomas, and Catharine Trotter Cockburn. Broad provides introductory essays for each figure and explanatory annotations to clarify unfamiliar language, content, and historical context for the modern reader. Her selections make available many letters that have never been published before or that live scattered in (...)
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  26. Hutcheson and his Critics and Opponents on the Moral Sense.Ruth Boeker - 2022 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 20 (2):143-161.
    This paper takes a new look at Francis Hutcheson's moral sense theory and examines it in light of the views of his rationalist critics and opponents who claim that there has to be an antecedent moral standard prior to any sense or affections. I examine how Gilbert Burnet, Samuel Clarke, and Catharine Trotter Cockburn each argue for the priority of reason over a moral sense and how Hutcheson responds or could respond to their views. Furthermore, I consider (...)
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  27. Locke on Being Self to My Self.Ruth Boeker - 2021 - In Patricia Kitcher (ed.), The Self: A History. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 118–144.
    John Locke accepts that every perception gives me immediate and intuitive knowledge of my own existence. However, this knowledge is limited to the present moment when I have the perception. If I want to understand the necessary and sufficient conditions of my continued existence over time, Locke argues that it is important to clarify what ‘I’ refers to. While we often do not distinguish the concept of a person from that of a human being in ordinary language, Locke emphasizes that (...)
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  28. Filosofiens annet kjønn.Tove Pettersen - 2011 - Pax Forlag A/S.
    Why are there so few women included in the history of philosophy? What are the consequences Why are there so few women included in the history of philosophy? What are the consequences from the fact that men have designed the vast majority of contemporary political and ethical theories? How can discrimination as well as equal treatment based on gender be philosophically justified? Are women the second sex of philosophy? And what is feminist philosophy? -/- In Philosophy’s Second Sex, Tove Pettersen (...)
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  29.  12
    Women Philosophers in Early Modern England.Margaret Atherton - 2002 - In Steven M. Nadler (ed.), A Companion to Early Modern Philosophy. Malden, Mass.: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 404–422.
    This chapter discusses the work of Margaret Cavendish (1623‐73), Anne Conway (1631‐79), Damaris Cudworth Masham (1659‐1708), Mary Astell (1666‐1731), and Catharine Trotter Cockburn (1679‐1749).
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  30.  69
    Women Philosophers of the Seventeenth Century, and: Anne Conway: A Woman Philosopher (review).Jane Duran - 2007 - Philosophy and Literature 31 (1):200-204.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Reviewed by:Women Philosophers of the Seventeenth Century, and: Anne Conway: A Woman PhilosopherJane DuranWomen Philosophers of the Seventeenth Century, by Jacqueline Broad; 204 pp. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002. $65.00. Anne Conway: A Woman Philosopher, by Sarah Hutton; 280 pp. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004. $75.00.Recent work on women philosophers has, in general, approached the topic from two vantage points: on the one hand, a number of anthologies have (...)
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  31.  24
    Women philosophers of the seventeenth century,.Jane Duran - 2007 - Philosophy and Literature 31 (1):200-204.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Reviewed by:Women Philosophers of the Seventeenth Century, and: Anne Conway: A Woman PhilosopherJane DuranWomen Philosophers of the Seventeenth Century, by Jacqueline Broad; 204 pp. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002. $65.00. Anne Conway: A Woman Philosopher, by Sarah Hutton; 280 pp. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004. $75.00.Recent work on women philosophers has, in general, approached the topic from two vantage points: on the one hand, a number of anthologies have (...)
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  32.  64
    A Moral Philosophy of Their Own? The Moral and Political Thought of Eighteenth-Century British Women.Karen Green - 2015 - The Monist 98 (1):89-101.
    Despite the fact that the High-Church Tory, Mary Astell, held political views diametrically opposed to the Whiggish Catharine Trotter Cockburn and Catharine Macaulay, it is here argued that their metaethical views were surprisingly similar. All were influenced by a blend of Christian universalism and Aristotelian eudaimonism, which accepted the existence of a law of nature, that we strive for happiness, and that happiness results from living in accord with our God-given nature. They differed with regard to (...)
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  33. Locke's Ethics and the British Moralists: The Lockean Legacy in Eighteenth Century Moral Philosophy.Patricia Sheridan - 2002 - Dissertation, The University of Western Ontario (Canada)
    This dissertation examines Locke's influence on moralists of the eighteenth century. I will show how Locke's moral theory and the problems it raises set the tenor of moral discussion for subsequent theorists. My analysis does not rely upon proving explicit and direct influences of Locke on the theorists I examine. Rather, I want to show that Locke's influence was more general and systemic than would be revealed through the search for explicit debts and appropriations. Locke's attempt to produce a moral (...)
     
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  34. Reading Lady Mary Shepherd.Margaret Atherton - 2005 - The Harvard Review of Philosophy 13 (2):73-85.
    Virginia Woolf, in A Room of One’s Own, asked why there were no women writers before 1800. If she had been thinking about philosophers instead of writers in the traditional women’s areas of plays and fiction, she might have asked why there were no women philosophers at all, for I suspect that most people would find it very hard to name a woman philosopher before the present day. To help her in answering her question, she invented a fictional character, Judith (...)
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  35. The Problem of Partiality in 18th century British Moral Philosophy.Getty L. Lustila - 2019 - Dissertation, Boston University
    The dissertation traces the development of what I call “the problem of partiality” through the work of certain key figures in the British Moralist tradition: John Locke, Catharine Trotter Cockburn, Anthony Ashley Cooper (the Third Earl of Shaftesbury), Francis Hutcheson, John Gay, David Hume, Joseph Butler, and Adam Smith. On the one hand, we are committed to impartiality as a constitutive norm of moral judgment and conduct. On the other hand, we are committed to the idea that (...)
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  36.  38
    Early Modern Women on Metaphysics.Emily Thomas (ed.) - 2018 - New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.
    The work of women philosophers in the early modern period has traditionally been overlooked, yet their writing on topics such as reality, time, mind and matter holds valuable lessons for our understanding of metaphysics and its history. This volume of new essays explores the work of nine key female figures: Bathsua Makin, Anna Maria van Schurman, Elisabeth of Bohemia, Margaret Cavendish, Anne Conway, Damaris Cudworth Masham, Mary Astell, Catharine Trotter Cockburn, and Émilie Du Châtelet. Investigating issues from (...)
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  37.  23
    Varieties of Voluntarism in Medieval and Early Modern Philosophy.Sonja Schierbaum & Jörn Müller (eds.) - 2024 - Routledge.
    This book considers different forms of voluntarism developed from the 13th to 18th centuries. By crossing the conventional dividing line between the medieval and early modern periods, the volume draws important new insights on the historical development of voluntarism. Voluntarism places a special emphasis on the will when it comes to the analysis and explanation of fundamental philosophical questions and problems. Since the Middle Ages, voluntarist considerations and views played an important role in the development of different theories of action, (...)
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  38.  96
    Early Modern Women on Metaphysics ed. by Emily Thomas. [REVIEW]John Grey - 2019 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 57 (1):167-168.
    Insofar as historians of philosophy aim to get the story right, it is now widely recognized that they must reckon with works of early modern women philosophers—oft-neglected philosophers who read, and were read by, canonical luminaries such as Descartes and Leibniz. Thomas’s volume collects thirteen new contributions to the scholarship on the metaphysics of such authors: Mary Astell, Elisabeth of Bohemia, Margaret Cavendish, Catharine Trotter Cockburn, Émilie Du Châtelet, Bathsua Makin, Damaris Masham, and Anna Maria van Schurman. (...)
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  39. Emily Thomas (red.): Early Modern Women on Metaphysics.Oda K. S. Davanger - 2018 - Norsk Filosofisk Tidsskrift 53 (2-3):171-175.
    På mange måter er dette en bok som blir utgitt alt for sent. Det er den første antologien av sitt slag, og retter fokus på kvinnelige metafysikere som virket i den tidlige moderne perioden (16. og tidlig 17. århundre). Redaktør Emily Thomas skriver i introduksjonen at til tross for at flere antologier om moderne metafysikk allerede finnes, er kvinnelige filosofer fortsatt underrepresentert og den filosofiske kanon mannsdominert. De ni filosofene som blir omtalt i totalt 13 kapitler var alle originale og (...)
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  40.  55
    Critical Notice. [REVIEW]Karen Detlefsen - 2004 - Philosophical Inquiry 26 (4):131-138.
    Critical notice of Jacqueline Broad's Women Philosophers of the Seventeenth Century (CUP, 2002).
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  41.  25
    Some Aspects of the Philosophy of Catharine Trotter.Martha Bolton Brandt - 1993 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 31 (4):565.
  42.  66
    Catharine Cockburn on Unthinking Immaterial Substance: Souls, Space, and Related Matters.Emily Thomas - 2015 - Philosophy Compass 10 (4):255-263.
    The early modern Catharine Cockburn wrote on a wide range of philosophical issues and recent years have seen an increasing interest in her work. This paper explores her thesis that immaterial substance need not think. Drawing on existing scholarship, I explore the origin of this thesis in Cockburn and show how she applies it in a novel way to space. This thesis provides a particularly useful entry point into Cockburn's philosophy, as it emphasises the importance of (...)
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  43. Catharine Cockburn on Substantival Space.Emily Thomas - 2013 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 30(30) 30:195–214.
  44.  29
    John Locke and Catharine Cockburn on Personal Identity.Emilio Maria De Tommaso & Giuliana Mocchi - 2021 - Rivista di Storia Della Filosofia 2:205-220.
    John Locke's account of personal identity is one of his most discussed theories. Opposing the Cartesian ontology of mind, Locke argued that the soul does not always think - for thinking is simply one of its operations, but not its essence -, and that personal identity consists in consciousness alone. Against Locke, an anonymous commentator published the Remarks upon an Essay concerning Humane Understanding charging Locke's view with possible immorality. Catharine Cockburn rebuffed the Remarker's objections, in her Defence (...)
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  45. Catharine Cockburn's Enlightenment.Victor Nuovo - 2011 - In Christianity, Antiquity, and Enlightenment: Interpretations of Locke. Springer.
  46.  73
    Reflection, Nature, and Moral Law: The Extent of Catharine Cockburn's Lockeanism in her Defence of Mr. Locke's Essay.Patricia Sheridan - 2007 - Hypatia 22 (3):133 - 151.
    This essay examines Catharine Cockburn's moral philosophy as it is developed in her Defence of Mr. Locke's Essay on Human Understanding. In this work, Cockburn argues that Locke's epistemological principles provide a foundation for the knowledge of natural law. Sheridan suggests that Cockburn's objective in defending Locke's moral epistemology was conditioned by her own prior commitment to a significantly un-Lockean theory of morality. In exploring Cockbum's views on morality in terms of their divergence from Locke's, the (...)
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  47. Creation, Divine Freedom, and Catharine Cockburn: An Intellectualist on Possible Worlds and Contingent Laws.Emily Thomas - 2017 - In Jacqueline Broad & Karen Detlefsen (eds.), Women and Liberty, 1600-1800: Philosophical Essays. New York, NY: Oxford University Press. pp. 206–220.
  48.  67
    Reflection, nature, and moral law: The extent of Catharine Cockburn's lockeanism in her.Patricia Sheridan - 2007 - Hypatia 22 (3):133-151.
    : This essay examines Catharine Cockburn's moral philosophy as it is developed in her Defence of Mr. Locke's Essay on Human Understanding. In this work, Cockburn argues that Locke's epistemological principles provide a foundation for the knowledge of natural law. Sheridan suggests that Cockburn's objective in defending Locke's moral epistemology was conditioned by her own prior commitment to a significantly un-Lockean theory of morality. In exploring Cockburn's views on morality in terms of their divergence from (...)
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  49. Margaret Cavendish, Anne Conway, and Catharine Cockburn on Matter.Emily Thomas - 2023 - In Karen Detlefsen & Lisa Shapiro (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Women and Early Modern European Philosophy. Routledge. pp. 112–126.
  50. Early Modern Women on the Cosmological Argument: A Case Study in Feminist History of Philosophy.Marcy P. Lascano - 2019 - In Eileen O’Neill & Marcy P. Lascano (eds.), Feminist History of Philosophy: The Recovery and Evaluation of Women’s Philosophical Thought. Springer, NM 87747, USA: Springer. pp. 23-47.
    This chapter discusses methodology in feminist history of philosophy and shows that women philosophers made interesting and original contributions to the debates concerning the cosmological argument. I set forth and examine the arguments of Mary Astell, Damaris Masham, Catherine Trotter Cockburn, Emilie Du Châtelet, and Mary Shepherd, and discuss their involvement with philosophical issues and debates surrounding the cosmological argument. I argue that their contributions are original, philosophically interesting, and result from participation in the ongoing debates and controversies (...)
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