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  1.  24
    Critical realism in nursing: an emerging approach.Catharine J. Schiller - 2016 - Nursing Philosophy 17 (2):88-102.
    Critical realism, a philosophical framework originally developed by Roy Bhaskar in the 1970s, represents a relatively new approach to research generally and to nursing research in particular. This article explores the ontological and epistemological tenets of critical realism and examines the application of critical realist principles to nursing research and practice through a review of the literature. It is evident that few published nursing research studies have, as of yet, utilized critical realism as their paradigm of choice. Both the strengths (...)
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  2.  9
    But it’s legal, isn’t it? Law and ethics in nursing practice related to medical assistance in dying.Catharine J. Schiller, Barbara Pesut, Josette Roussel & Madeleine Greig - 2019 - Nursing Philosophy 20 (4):e12277.
    In June 2015, the Supreme Court of Canada struck down the Criminal Code's prohibition on assisted death. Just over a year later, the federal government crafted legislation to entrench medical assistance in dying (MAiD), the term used in Canada in place of physician‐assisted death. Notably, Canada became the first country to allow nurse practitioners to act as assessors and providers, a result of a strong lobby by the Canadian Nurses Association. However, a legislated approach to assisted death has proven challenging (...)
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    Medical assistance in dying: A political issue for nurses and nursing in Canada.Davina Banner, Catharine J. Schiller & Shannon Freeman - 2019 - Nursing Philosophy 20 (4):e12281.
    Death and dying are natural phenomena embedded within complex political, cultural and social systems. Nurses often practice at the forefront of this process and have a fundamental role in caring for both patients and those close to them during the process of dying and following death. While nursing has a rich tradition in advancing the palliative and end‐of‐life care movement, new modes of care for patients with serious and irremediable medical conditions arise when assisted death is legalized in a particular (...)
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