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Casey Johnson
University of Idaho
  1.  24
    Just Say ‘No’: Obligations to Voice Disagreement.Casey Rebecca Johnson - 2018 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 84:117-138.
    It is uncontroversial that we sometimes have moral obligations to voice our disagreements, when, for example, the stakes are high and a wrong course of action will be pursued. But might we sometimes also have epistemic obligations to voice disagreements? In this paper, I will argue that we sometimes do. In other words, sometimes, to be behaving as we ought, qua epistemic agents, we must not only disagree with an interlocutor who has voiced some disagreed-with content but must also testify (...)
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  2.  36
    Mansplaining and Illocutionary Force.Casey Rebecca Johnson - 2020 - Feminist Philosophy Quarterly 6 (4).
    In this paper I describe three kinds of mansplaining, “well, actually” mansplaining, straw-mansplaining, and speech act–confusion mansplaining. While these three kinds have much in common, I focus on speech act–confusion mansplaining and offer a speech act theoretic account of what goes wrong when people mansplain in this way. In cases of speech act–confusion mansplaining, the target of the mansplaining is not able to do what she wants with her words. Her conversational contribution is taken to have a different force than (...)
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  3.  72
    Testimony and the Constitutive Norm of Assertion.Casey Rebecca Johnson - 2015 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 23 (3):356-375.
    I can, given the right conditions, transmit my knowledge to you by telling you some information. If I know the time, and if all goes well, I can bring it about that you know it too. If conditions are right, all I have to do is assert to you what time it is. Paradigmatically, speakers use assertions to transmit what they know to their hearers. Clearly, assertion and testimony are tightly connected. The nature of this connection, however, is not so (...)
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  4.  30
    Epistemic Vulnerability.Casey Rebecca Johnson - 2020 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 28 (5):677-691.
    In developing her ethics of care, Eva Kittay discusses the vulnerability and voluntarism models of obligation. Kittay uses the vulnerability model to demonstrate that we have some obligations to ca...
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  5.  17
    Just Words: On Speech and Hidden Harm, by Mary Kate McGowan.Casey Rebecca Johnson - 2021 - Mind 130 (518):680-689.
    Just Words: On Speech and Hidden Harm, by McGowanMary Kate. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2019. Pp. xi + 209.
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  6.  22
    Ian M. Church & Peter L. Samuelson, Intellectual Humility: An Introduction to the Philosophy and Science, London/Oxford/New York: Bloomsbury Academic, 2017, 368 Pp., £65 , ISBN 9781474236744. [REVIEW]Casey Rebecca Johnson - 2017 - Dialectica 71 (4):647-653.
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  7.  4
    Voicing Dissent: The Ethics and Epistemology of Making Disagreement Public.Casey Rebecca Johnson (ed.) - 2018 - Routledge.
    Disagreement is, for better or worse, pervasive in our society. Not only do we form beliefs that differ from those around us, but increasingly we have platforms and opportunities to voice those disagreements and make them public. In light of the public nature of many of our most important disagreements, a key question emerges: How does public disagreement affect what we know? This volume collects original essays from a number of prominent scholars--including Catherine Elgin, Sanford Goldberg, Jennifer Lackey, Michael Patrick (...)
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  8.  25
    If You Don’T Have Anything Nice to Say, Come Sit By Me.Casey Rebecca Johnson - 2016 - Social Theory and Practice 42 (2):304-317.
    In this paper, I argue that gossip is both an epistemic evil—it can restrict access to information—and an epistemic good—it can be a key resource for knowers. These two faces of gossip can be illustrated when we consider the effects of participating in and being excluded from gossiping groups. Social psychology has begun to study these effects and their results are useful here. Because of these two aspects, I argue, gossip holds a peculiar place in our epistemic economy. It is (...)
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