Results for 'Cartesianism'

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  1.  5
    Steven Nadler.of Arnauld'S. Cartesianism - 1995 - In Roger Ariew & Marjorie Glicksman Grene (eds.), Descartes and His Contemporaries: Meditations, Objections, and Replies. University of Chicago Press.
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  2.  12
    Vincent Carraud.To Cartesianism - 1995 - In Roger Ariew & Marjorie Glicksman Grene (eds.), Descartes and His Contemporaries: Meditations, Objections, and Replies. University of Chicago Press. pp. 110.
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  3. Cartesianism, the Embodied Mind, and the Future of Cognitive Research.Philippe Gagnon - 2015 - In Dirk Evers, Michael Fuller, Anne Runehov & Knut-Willy Sæther (eds.), Do Emotions Shape the World? Biennial Yearbook of the European Society for the Study of Science and Theology 2015-2016. "Studies in Science and Theology" Vol. 15. Martin-Luther-Universität. pp. 225-244.
    In his oft-cited book Descartes' Error, Antonio Damasio claims that Descartes is responsible for having stifled the development of modern neurobiological science, in particular as regards the objective study of the physical and physiological bases for emotive and socially-conditioned cognition. Most of Damasio’s book would stand without reference to Descartes, so it is intriguing to ask why he launched this attack. What seems to fuel such claims is a desire for a more holistic understanding of the mind, the brain and (...)
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  4. Concept Cartesianism, Concept Pragmatism, and Frege Cases.Bradley Rives - 2009 - Philosophical Studies 144 (2):211-238.
    This paper concerns the dialectal role of Frege Cases in the debate between Concept Cartesians and Concept Pragmatists. I take as a starting point Christopher Peacocke’s argument that, unlike Cartesianism, his ‘Fregean’ Pragmatism can account for facts about the rationality and epistemic status of certain judgments. I argue that since this argument presupposes that the rationality of thoughts turn on their content, it is thus question-begging against Cartesians, who claim that issues about rationality turn on the form, not the (...)
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  5.  42
    Radical Cartesianism: The French Reception of Descartes.Tad M. Schmaltz - 2002 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    This is a book-length study of two of Descartes's most innovative successors, Robert Desgabets and Pierre-Sylvain Regis, and of their highly original contributions to Cartesianism. The focus of the book is an analysis of radical doctrines in the work of these thinkers that derive from arguments in Descartes: on the creation of eternal truths, on the intentionality of ideas, and on the soul-body union. As well as relating their work to that of fellow Cartesians such as Malebranche and Arnauld, (...)
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  6.  12
    Dutch Cartesianism and the Birth of Philosophy of Science: From Regius to ‘s Gravesande.Andrea Strazzoni - 2018 - Berlin-Boston: De Gruyter.
    How did the relations between philosophy and science evolve during the 17th and the 18th century? This book analyzes this issue by considering the history of Cartesianism in Dutch universities, as well as its legacy in the 18th century. It takes into account the ways in which the disciplines of logic and metaphysics became functional to the justification and reflection on the conceptual premises and the methods of natural philosophy, changing their traditional roles as art of reasoning and as (...)
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  7.  17
    Cartesianism and feminism.Marie-frédérique Pellegrin - 2019 - In Steven Nadler, Tad M. Schmaltz & Delphine Antoine-Mahut (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Descartes and Cartesianism. Oxford, England: Oxford University Press. pp. 565-579.
    Cartesianism constitutes a particular and crucial moment in the history of the relations between the aims of philosophy and feminist claims. This is explained by theoretical reasons (the new Cartesian science posits a human being that is fundamentally non-sexual and ungendered) and by practical reasons (the importance of the philosophical vocations for women and the feminist vocations for men that Cartesianism has permitted). Recent readings of Descartes (which see him either as a misogynist or as a philogynist) show (...)
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  8.  58
    Beyond Cartesianism: Body-perception and the immediacy of empathy.Joona Taipale - 2015 - Continental Philosophy Review 48 (2):161-178.
    The current debates dealing with empathy, social cognition, and the problem of other minds widely accept the assumption that, whereas we can directly perceive the other’s body, certain additional mental operations are needed in order to access the contents of the other’s mind. Body-perception has, in other words, been understood as something that merely mediates our experience of other minds and requires no philosophical analysis in itself. The available accounts have accordingly seen their main task as pinpointing the operations and (...)
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  9.  13
    Spinoza and Dutch Cartesianism: Philosophy and Theology.Alexander Douglas - 2015 - Oxford, U. K.: Oxford University Press.
    Alexander X. Douglas situates Spinoza's philosophy in its immediate historical context, and argues that much of his work was conceived with the aim of rebutting the claims of his contemporaries. In contrast to them, Spinoza argued that philosophy reveals the true nature of God, and reinterpreted the concept of God in profound and radical ways.
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  10.  58
    Anti‐Cartesianism and Anti‐Brentanism: The Problem of Anti‐Representationalist Intentionalism.Jean-Michel Roy - 2015 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 53 (S1):90-125.
    Despite its internal divisions and the uncertainty surrounding many of its foundations, there is a growing consensus that the on‐going search for an alternative model of the mind finds a minimal theoretical identity in the pursuit of an anti‐Cartesian conception of mental phenomena. Nevertheless, this anti‐Cartesianism remains more or less explicitly committed to the neo‐Brentanian idea that intentionality is an essential feature of the mental—an idea that has prevailed since the advent of modern cognitive science in the 1950s. An (...)
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  11.  37
    Social Cartesianism: Francois Poulain de la Barre and the Origins of the Enlightenment.Siep Stuurman - 1997 - Journal of the History of Ideas 58 (4):617-640.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Social Cartesianism: François Poulain de la Barre and the Origins of the EnlightenmentSiep StuurmanMore than sixty years ago Paul Hazard demonstrated that the major ideas usually associated with the eighteenth-century French Enlightenment were voiced as early as the 1680s. 1 Hazard situated Cartesianism squarely at the origins of his story: Descartes himself may have wanted to remain a moderate in political and religious matters, but his followers (...)
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  12. Cartesianism and its Feminist Promise and Limits: The Case of Mary Astell.Karen Detlefsen - 2017 - In Stephen Gaukroger & Catherine Wilson (eds.), Descartes and Cartesianism: Essays in Honour of Desmond Clarke. Oxford, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press.
    In this paper, I consider Mary Astell's contributions to the history of feminism, noting her grounding in and departure from Cartesianism and its relation to women.
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  13.  73
    The cartesianism of phenomenology.Steven Crowell - 2002 - Continental Philosophy Review 35 (4):433-454.
  14.  8
    Self‐Consciousness, Anti‐Cartesianism, and Cognitive Semantics in Hegel's 1807 Phenomenology.Kenneth R. Westphal - 2011 - In Stephen Houlgate & Michael Baur (eds.), A Companion to Hegel. Malden, MA: Wiley‐Blackwell. pp. 68–90.
    This chapter contains sections titled: Introduction Hegel's Semantics of Singular Cognitive Reference Hegel's Justification of His Semantics of Singular Cognitive Reference in “Consciousness” “Self‐Consciousness,” Thought, and the Semantics of Singular Cognitive Reference Hegel's Interim Critique of the Ego‐Centric Predicament Conclusion References.
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  15.  2
    Cartesianism.Виктор Визгин - 2020 - Philosophical Anthropology 6 (1):139-162.
    The paper is devoted to the analyses of the Cartesianism that was the most important direction in the philosophy and science of the XVII and first half of the next century. Reception, expansion and modification of the Descartes’ doctrine was going in the concrete social and cultural context. Author shows than Cartesianism is the unique synthesis of the tradition and innovation in the epoch of scientific revolution. His coming-to-be had passed in the sharp struggle with the peripatetic Scholasticism. (...)
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  16.  9
    Radical Cartesianism: The French Reception of Descartes (review).Richard A. Watson - 2003 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 41 (3):415-416.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Journal of the History of Philosophy 41.3 (2003) 415-416 [Access article in PDF] Tad M. Schmaltz. Radical Cartesianism: The French Reception of Descartes. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002. Pp. xiv + 288. Cloth, $65.00.More than fifty years ago Richard H. Popkin urged historians of philosophy to work on secondary figures in philosophy, in part for their own sake, but also because the true shape of philosophy and the (...)
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  17.  57
    Cartesianism and Port-Royal.Steven Nadler - 1988 - The Monist 71 (4):573-584.
    Contrary to what appears to be popular belief, Port-Royal was not a bastion of cartesianism. In fact, Of all the port-Royalists of the seventeenth century, Only arnauld can be considered a cartesian in any interesting sense. Most of the others associated with the order were hostile to the new philosophy and actively campaigned against it, Believing it to pose a threat to piety and "true" religion. This can be seen by examining the writings of de sacy, Du vaucel, And (...)
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  18.  11
    3. Cartesianism as the Philosophy of the School: Logic, metaphysics, and rational theology.Andrea Strazzoni - 2018 - In Dutch Cartesianism and the Birth of Philosophy of Science: From Regius to ‘s Gravesande. Berlin-Boston: De Gruyter. pp. 39-68.
    The third chapter gives an account of the debates over Cartesianism outlined below, which shifted from the University of Utrecht to Leiden, where the new philosophy was introduced by Adriaan Heereboord in the early 1640s, and was carried on by Johannes de Raey at the end of the decade. In Leiden, the quarrels over Cartesianism were prompted by the intervention of the theologian Jacob Revius, criticising Descartes’s philosophy as a source of Pelagianism in 1647. This gave rise to (...)
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  19.  53
    Overturning cartesianism and the hermeneutics of suspicion: Rethinking Dreyfus on Heidegger.Leslie MacAvoy - 2001 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 44 (4):455 – 480.
    This essay critically engages Dreyfus's widely read interpretation of Heidegger's Being and Time . It argues that Dreyfus's reading is rooted in two primary claims or interpretative principles. The first - the Cartesianism thesis - indicates that Heidegger's objective in Being and Time is to overturn Cartesianism. The second - the hermeneutics of suspicion thesis - claims that Division II is supposed to suspect and throw into question the results of the Division I analysis. These theses contribute to (...)
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  20. Cartesianism and Eucharistic physics.Jean-Robert Armogathe - 2019 - In Steven Nadler, Tad M. Schmaltz & Delphine Antoine-Mahut (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Descartes and Cartesianism. Oxford, England: Oxford University Press.
     
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  21.  41
    Cartesianism’ Redux or Situated Knowledges.Don Ihde - 2012 - Foundations of Science 17 (4):369-372.
    Postphenomenology, in a complementary role with other science studies disciplines, remains within the trajectory of those theories which reject early modern epistemology and metaphysics, including rejection of ‘subject’–‘object’ distinctions, and holds, instead, to an inter-relational, co-constitutive ontology. Here the critiques which sometimes echo vestiges of such early modern epistemology are counter-challenged.
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  22.  27
    Cartesianism and Port-Royal in Descartes and His Contemporaries.Steven Nadler - 1988 - The Monist 71 (4):573-584.
    CONTRARY TO WHAT APPEARS TO BE POPULAR BELIEF, PORT-ROYAL WAS NOT A BASTION OF CARTESIANISM. IN FACT, OF ALL THE PORT-ROYALISTS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, ONLY ARNAULD CAN BE CONSIDERED A CARTESIAN IN ANY INTERESTING SENSE. MOST OF THE OTHERS ASSOCIATED WITH THE ORDER WERE HOSTILE TO THE NEW PHILOSOPHY AND ACTIVELY CAMPAIGNED AGAINST IT, BELIEVING IT TO POSE A THREAT TO PIETY AND "TRUE" RELIGION. THIS CAN BE SEEN BY EXAMINING THE WRITINGS OF DE SACY, DU VAUCEL, AND (...)
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  23. The Cartesianism of Desgabets and Arnauld and the Problem of the Eternal Truths.Emmanuel Faye - 2005 - Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy 2:193-209.
     
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  24. Cartesianism and Intersubjectivity in Paranormal Activity and the Philosophy of Mind.Steve Jones - 2017 - Film-Philosophy 21 (1):1-19.
    Over the last century within the philosophy of mind, the intersubjective model of self has gained traction as a viable alternative to the oft-criticised Cartesian solipsistic paradigm. These two models are presented as incompatible inasmuch as Cartesians perceive other minds as “a problem” for the self, while intersubjectivists insist that sociality is foundational to selfhood. This essay uses the Paranormal Activity series (2007–2015) to explore this philosophical debate. It is argued that these films simultaneously evoke Cartesian premises (via found-footage camerawork), (...)
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  25.  28
    Cartesianism in ethics.E. M. Adams - 1955 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 16 (3):353-366.
  26. Neo-Cartesianism and the Problem of Animal Suffering.Michael Murray - 2006 - Faith and Philosophy 23 (2):169-190.
    The existence and extent of animal suffering provides grounds for a serious evidential challenge to theism. In the wake of the Darwinian revolution, this strain of natural atheology has taken on substantially greater significance. In this essay we argue that there are at least four neo-Cartesian views on the nature of animal minds which would serve to deflect this evidential challenge.
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  27. The Cartesianism of Desgabets and Arnauld and the Problem of the Eternal Truths.Emmanuel Faye - 2005 - In Daniel Garber & Steven Nadler (eds.), Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy Volume 2. Oxford University Press.
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  28.  2
    Cartesianism and Biblical Criticism.Richard H. Popkin - 1982 - In Thomas M. Lennon (ed.), Problems of Cartesianism. Institute for Research on Public Policy. pp. 61-81.
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  29.  43
    Evans, transparency, and Cartesianism.David Zapero - 2020 - European Journal of Philosophy 28 (3):685-702.
    In The Varieties of Reference, Evans makes two parallel claims about thought and perception. He argues that both our capacity to self-ascribe thought and our capacity to self-ascribe perception are fallible. The essay focuses on his claim about perception and examines its relation to Evans's project of rejecting a Cartesian conception of the mind. In his theory of perception, I argue, Evans embraces a conception of first-person authority that he seeks to reject in his account of thought. He is thus (...)
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  30.  11
    Between Cartesianism and orthodoxy: God and the problem of indifference in Christoph Wittich’s Anti-Spinoza.Yoshi Kato & Kuni Sakamoto - 2022 - Intellectual History Review 32 (2):239-257.
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  31.  4
    Methodological Cartesianism.Gregory Landini - 2014 - In Javier Cumpa, Greg Jesson & Guido Bonino (eds.), Defending Realism: Ontological and Epistemological Investigations. De Gruyter. pp. 63-98.
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  32.  76
    Cartesianism and Feminism. What Reason Has Forgotten; Reasons for Forgetting.Celia Amorós, Ana Uriarte & Linda López McAlister - 1994 - Hypatia 9 (1):147-163.
    This paper recovers and pays homage to the arguments in support of the equality of the sexes developed by the Seventeenth Century Cartesian philosopher François Poullain de la Barre (1647-1723).
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  33.  65
    Neo-Cartesianism and the expanded problem of animal suffering.Phil Halper, Kenneth Williford, David Rudrauf & Perry N. Fuchs - 2023 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 94 (2):177-198.
    Several well-known theodicies, whatever their merits, seem to make little sense of animal suffering. Here we argue that the problem of animal suffering has more layers than has generally been acknowledged in the literature and thus poses an even greater challenge to traditional Judeo-Christian Theism than is normally thought. However, the Neo-Cartesian (NC) defence would succeed in defanging this Expanded Problem of Animal Suffering. Several contemporary philosophers have suggested that recent evidence either supports the NC view or at least should (...)
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  34. Cartesianism and history : from the rejection of the past to a "critical" history of philosophy.Gregorio Piaia - 2012 - In Marco Sgarbi (ed.), Translatio Studiorum: Ancient, Medieval and Modern Bearers of Intellectual History. Brill.
     
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  35. Cartesianism and the Kinematics of Mechanisms: Or, How to find Fixed Reference Frames in a Cartesian Space-time.Edward Slowik - 1998 - Noûs 32 (3):364-385.
    In De gravitatione, Newton contends that Descartes' physics is fundamentally untenable since the "fixed" spatial landmarks required to ground the concept of inertial motion cannot be secured in the constantly changing Cartesian plenum. Likewise, it is has often been alleged that the collision rules in Descartes' Principles of Philosophy undermine the "relational" view of space and motion advanced in this text. This paper attempts to meet these challenges by investigating the theory of connected gears (or "kinematics of mechanisms") for a (...)
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  36. Early Cartesianism and the Journal des Sçavans, 1665–1671.Mihnea Dobre - 2011 - Studium: Tijdschrift Voor Wetenschaps- En Universiteits-Geschiedenis | Revue d'Histoire des Sciences Et des Universités 4:228-240.
    The appearance of scientific journals in the second half of the seventeenth century not only presented new opportunities for the dissemination of knowledge, but also offers the historian a privileged view of the shared knowledge within the scientific community. The Journal des Sçavans, founded in 1665, proclaimed its ambition to disseminate news about books and people concerning the République des lettres. Given the reportedly high interest in and opposition to the rise of Cartesianism among contemporary philosophers, this paper explores (...)
     
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  37.  22
    Of Cartesianism and Spiritual Exercises.Matteo J. Stettler & Matthew Sharpe - 2022 - Philosophy Today 66 (3):471-489.
    This article challenges the recurrent critique that Pierre Hadot’s identification of ancient philosophy with the practice of spiritual exercises introduces a non- or irrational dimension into metaphilosophy. The occasion to do this is provided by Kerem Eksen’s recent reading of Descartes’s Meditations as consisting of solely intellectual, rather than spiritual, exercises—since the latter, Eksen claims, involve extrarational means and ends. Part 2 presents an alternative account of the role of cognition in the ancient meditatio at issue in understanding Descartes’s antecedents. (...)
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  38. The Cartesianism of Desgabets and Arnauld and the Problem of the Eternal Truths.Emmanuel Faye - 2005 - In Daniel Garber & Steven Nadler (eds.), Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy Volume 2. Oxford University Press.
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  39. Anti-Cartesianism and James.Chandana Chakrabarti - 1976 - Indian Philosophical Quarterly 6 (2):289.
     
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  40. Closet cartesianism in discursive psychology.Wes Sharrock - 2009 - In Ivan Leudar & Alan Costall (eds.), Against Theory of Mind. Palgrave-Macmillan.
     
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  41.  30
    The cartesianism of phenomenology.James Street Fulton - 1940 - Philosophical Review 49 (3):285-308.
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  42.  91
    Holism in cartesianism and in today's philosophy of physics.Michael Esfeld - 1999 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 30 (1):17-36.
    The aim of this paper is to contribute to a more balanced judgement than the widespread impression that the changes which are called for in today's philosophy of physics and which centre around the concept of holism amount to a rupture with the framework of Cartesian philosophy of physics. I argue that this framework includes a sort of holism: As a result of the identification of matter with space, any physical property can be instantiated only if there is the whole (...)
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  43. Cartesianism in Britain.Sarah Hutton - 2019 - In Steven Nadler, Tad M. Schmaltz & Delphine Antoine-Mahut (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Descartes and Cartesianism. Oxford, England: Oxford University Press.
     
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  44.  46
    The Radical Cartesianism of Robert Desgabets and the Scholastic Heritage.Han Thomas Adriaenssen - 2015 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 23 (1):46-68.
    Robert Desgabets has been described as a ‘radical Cartesian’. Drawing conclusions from Descartes's thought that Descartes himself had failed to see, Desgabets treated Cartesianism as a work in progress that awaited further enrichment and development. But, as scholars have recognized, Desgabets's writings also betray a significant indebtedness to scholastic tradition. In presenting his philosophy, Desgabets often appeals to traditional notions, breathing new life into scholastic concepts and ideas. This paper investigates what we are to make of the scholastic vestiges (...)
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  45.  12
    Radical Cartesianism: The French Reception of Descartes.John J. Conley - 2004 - International Philosophical Quarterly 44 (1):115-116.
  46.  13
    Neural Cartesianism. Comments on the Epistemology of the Cognitive Sciences.Jeff Coulter - 1997 - In David Martel Johnson & Christina E. Erneling (eds.), The Future of the Cognitive Revolution. Oxford University Press. pp. 293--301.
  47.  12
    "The Cartesianism of Phenomenology." The Philosophical Review.James Street Fulton - 1942 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 2 (4):551-558.
  48. Cartesianism and the Private Language Argument.Brian Garrett - 2002 - Sorites 14:57-62.
    In this paper, I argue that neither the #257 argument nor the #258 argument in Wittgenstein's Philosophical Investigations undermines the coherence of the Cartesian Model, according to which a sensation word, such as `headache' or `tickle', gets its meaning in virtue of an act of `inner' association or ostensive definition. In addition, I argue against the standard assumption that the diarist's language of #258 is logically private.
     
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  49.  18
    Platonism, cartesianism and Hegel’s thought in the Matrix Trilogy.Predrag Milidrag - 2013 - Filozofija I Društvo 24 (4):268-282.
    U ovom tekstu pokusacu da protumacim promene kod Nea, glavnog lika trilogije Matriks, na zaledju Platonovih i Dekartovih ideja, kao i Hegelovih iz Filozofije istorije i Fenomenologije duha. Iako?filozofski?, Matriks nije razvucen niti dosadan film: umesto da beskrajno pricaju, likovi neprestano rade i taj ih rad menja. Suprotno rasirenom misljenju, ova interpretacija ne nalazi Dekartovu radikalnu sumnju u prvom delu trilogije, vec ga vidi kao dosledni platonizam. No, u njemu ima kartezijanskih motiva. Rezultat prvog dela jeste hegelovska nesretna svest. Sve (...)
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  50.  75
    Neo-Cartesianism and the Problem of Animal Suffering.Glenn Ross - 2006 - Faith and Philosophy 23 (2):169-190.
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