Results for 'Carrie S. I. Jenkins'

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  49
    What Love Is: And What It Could Be.Carrie S. I. Jenkins - 2017 - Basic Books.
    This book unpicks the conceptual, ideological, and metaphysical tangles that get in the way of understanding romantic love. -/- Written for a general audience, What Love Is And What It Could Be explores different disciplinary perspectives on love, in search of the bigger picture. It presents a "dual-nature" theory: romantic love is simultaneously both a biological phenomenon and a social construct. The key philosophical insight comes in explaining why this a coherent—and indeed a necessary—position to take. -/- The deep motivation (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  2.  99
    Grounding Concepts: An Empirical Basis for Arithmetical Knowledge.Carrie S. Jenkins - 2008 - Oxford, England: Oxford University Press.
    Carrie Jenkins presents a new account of arithmetical knowledge, which manages to respect three key intuitions: a priorism, mind-independence realism, and empiricism. Jenkins argues that arithmetic can be known through the examination of empirically grounded concepts, non-accidentally accurate representations of the mind-independent world.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   38 citations  
  3.  92
    What Can We Know a Priori?Carrie Jenkins - unknown
    Michael Devitt has been developing an influential two-pronged attack on the a priori for over thirteen years. This attack does not attempt to undermine the coherence or significance of the distinction between the a priori and the a posteriori, but rather to answer the question: 'What Can We Know A Priori?' with: 'Nothing'. In this paper I explain why I am dissatisfied with key extant responses to Devitt's attack, and then take my own steps towards resisting the attack as it (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  4.  76
    Metaphysical Vagueness Without Vague Objects.Al Abasnezhad & C. S. I. Jenkins - 2018 - Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 7 (4):278-283.
    Elizabeth Barnes and Robert Williams have developed a theory of metaphysical indeterminacy, via which they defend the theoretical legitimacy of vague objects. In this paper, we argue that while the Barnes–Williams theory supplies a viable account of genuine metaphysical vagueness, it cannot underwrite an account of genuinely vague objects. First we clarify the distinction between these two key theses. Then we argue that the Barnes–Williams theory of metaphysical vagueness not only fails to deliver genuinely vague objects, it in fact provides (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  5. On Putting Knowledge 'First'.Jonathan Ichikawa & C. S. I. Jenkins - 2017 - In Joseph Adam Carter, Emma C. Gordon & Benjamin Jarvis (eds.), Knowledge First: Approaches in Epistemology and Mind. Oxford University Press.
    There is a New Idea in epistemology. It goes by the name of ‘knowledge first,’ and it is particularly associated with Timothy Williamson’s book Knowledge and Its Limits. In slogan form, to put knowledge first is to treat knowledge as basic or fundamental, and to explain other states—belief, justification, maybe even content itself—in terms of knowledge, instead of vice versa. The idea has proven enormously interesting, and equally controversial. But deep foundational questions about its actual content remain relatively unexplored. We (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  6. Merely Verbal Disputes.C. S. I. Jenkins - 2014 - Erkenntnis 79 (S1):11-30.
    Philosophers readily talk about merely verbal disputes, usually without much or any explicit reflection on what these are, and a good deal of methodological significance is attached to discovering whether a dispute is merely verbal or not. Currently, metaphilosophical advances are being made towards a clearer understanding of what exactly it takes for something to be a merely verbal dispute. This paper engages with this growing literature, pointing out some problems with existing approaches, and develops a new proposal which builds (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   42 citations  
  7.  35
    The Truth Fairy and the Indirect Epistemic Consequentialist.Daniel Y. Elstein & C. S. I. Jenkins - 2020 - In Peter J. Graham & Nikolaj J. L. L. Pedersen (eds.), Epistemic Entitlement. Oxford, UK: pp. 344-360.
    Friends of Wright-entitlement cannot appeal to direct epistemic consequentialism (believe or accept what maximizes expected epistemic value) in order to account for the epistemic rationality of accepting Wright-entitled propositions. The tenability of direct consequentialism is undermined by the “Truth Fairy”: a powerful being who offers you great epistemic reward (in terms of true beliefs) if you accept a proposition p for which you have evidence neither for nor against. However, this chapter argues that a form of indirect epistemic consequentialism seems (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  8. Presupposition and Consent.Jonathan Jenkins Ichikawa - 2020 - Feminist Philosophy Quarterly 6 (4):Article 4.
    I argue that “consent” language presupposes that the contemplated action is or would be at someone else’s behest. When one does something for another reason—for example, when one elects independently to do something, or when one accepts an invitation to do something—it is linguistically inappropriate to describe the actor as “consenting” to it; but it is also inappropriate to describe them as “not consenting” to it. A consequence of this idea is that “consent” is poorly suited to play its canonical (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  9. The Traditional Conception of the a Priori.Masashi Kasaki & C. S. I. Jenkins - 2015 - Synthese 192 (9):2725-2746.
    In this paper, we explore the traditional conception of a prioricity as epistemic independence of evidence from sense experience. We investigate the fortunes of the traditional conception in the light of recent challenges by Timothy Williamson. We contend that Williamson’s arguments can be resisted in various ways. En route, we argue that Williamson’s views are not as distant from tradition as they might seem at first glance.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  10. Intuition, ‘Intuition’, Concepts and the A Priori.C. S. I. Jenkins - 2014 - In Booth Anthony Robert & P. Rowbottom Darrell (eds.), Intuitions. Oxford University Press.
    This chapter attempts to put structure on some of the different philosophical uses of ‘intuition’. It argues that ‘intuition’-hood is associated with four bundles of symptoms: a commonsensicality bundle; an a prioricity and immediacy bundle, and a metaphilosophical bundle. Tentatively suggesting that the word ‘intuition’ as used by philosophers is best regarded as ambiguous, the chapter offers a much simpler view concerning the meaning of ‘intuition’ in philosophy. With some of the attacks on ‘intuition’ as an epistemic source explored, the (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  11. Serious Verbal Disputes: Ontology, Metaontology, and Analyticity.C. S. I. Jenkins - 2014 - Journal of Philosophy 111 (9-10):454-469.
    This paper builds on some important recent work by Amie Thomasson, wherein she argues that recent disputes about the existence of ordinary objects have arisen due to eliminiativist metaphysicians’ misunderstandings. Some, she argues, are mistaken about how the language of quantification works, while others neglect the existence and significance of certain analytic entailments. Thomasson claims that once these misunderstandings are cleared away, it is trivially easy to answer existence questions about ordinary objects using everyday empirical methods of investigation. She reveals (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  12. Justification Magnets.C. S. I. Jenkins - 2013 - Philosophical Studies 164 (1):93-111.
    David Lewis is associated with the controversial thesis that some properties are more eligible than others to be the referents of our predicates solely in virtue of those properties’ being more natural; independently, that is, of anything to do with our patterns of usage of the relevant predicates. On such a view, the natural properties act as ‘reference magnets’. In this paper I explore (though I do not endorse) a related thesis in epistemology: that some propositions are ‘justification magnets’. According (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  13. What Is Love? An Incomplete Map of the Metaphysics.C. S. I. Jenkins - 2015 - Journal of the American Philosophical Association 1 (2):349--364.
    ABSTRACT:The paper begins by surveying a range of possible views on the metaphysics of romantic love, organizing them as responses to a single question. It then outlines a position, constructionist functionalism, according to which romantic love is characterized by a functional role that is at least partly constituted by social matters, although this role may be realized by states that are not socially constructed.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  14. Modal Monogamy.C. S. I. Jenkins - 2015 - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy 2.
  15.  27
    'Addicted'? To 'Love'?C. S. I. Jenkins - 2017 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 24 (1):93-96.
    Earp et al. offer a very interesting summary of, and ethical commentary on, recent multidisciplinary research suggesting that at least some cases of what we call ‘romantic love’ involve phenomena that physically and/or psychologically resemble cases of what we call ‘addiction.’ They draw a conceptual distinction between what they call ‘narrow’ and ‘broad’ concepts of addiction. On the narrow conception, only extreme, harmful, or abnormal cases of love would count as addiction. On the broad conception, even ordinary or normal cases (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  16.  21
    Knowing Our Own Hearts: Self‐Reporting and the Science of Love.C. S. I. Jenkins - 2016 - Philosophical Issues 26 (1):226-242.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  17.  47
    Epistemic Entitlement.Peter Graham & Nikolaj Jang Lee Linding Pedersen (eds.) - 2020 - Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
    Table of Contents -/- 1. Introduction and Overview: Two Entitlement Projects, Peter J. Graham, Nikolaj J.L.L. Pedersen, Zachary Bachman, and Luis Rosa -/- Part I. Engaging Burge's Project -/- 2. Entitlement: The Basis of Empirical Warrant, Tyler Burge 3. Perceptual Entitlement and Scepticism, Anthony Brueckner and Jon Altschul 4. Epistemic Entitlement Its Scope and Limits, Mikkel Gerken 5. Why Should Warrant Persist in Demon Worlds?, Peter J. Graham -/- Part II. Extending the Externalist Project -/- 6. Epistemic Entitlement and Epistemic (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  18.  10
    Going to Ground with Concepts: Carrie S. Jenkins, Grounding Concepts, an Empirical Basis for Arithmetical Knowledge. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 2008, 304 Pp, £35.00 HB.Philip Ebert - 2010 - Metascience 19 (2):217-220.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19.  12
    A Priori.C. S. I. Jenkins - 2013 - In Albert Casullo & Joshua C. Thurow (eds.), The a Priori in Philosophy. Oxford University Press. pp. 274.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20. Reflective Knowledge and Epistemic Circularity.C. S. I. Jenkins - 2011 - Philosophical Papers 40 (3):305-325.
    Abstract This paper examines the kind of epistemic circularity which, according to Ernest Sosa, is unavoidably entailed whenever one has what he calls ?reflective? knowledge (that is, knowledge that p such that the knower reflectively endorses the reliability of the epistemic sources by which she came to her belief that p). I begin by describing the relevant kind of circularity and its role in Sosa's epistemology, en route presenting and resisting Sosa's arguments that this kind of circularity is not vicious. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21.  84
    Kripkenstein and the Cleverly Disguised Mules.C. S. I. Jenkins - 2011 - Analytic Philosophy 52 (2):88-99.
  22. The Gravity of Pure Forces.Nico Jenkins - 2011 - Continent 1 (1):60-67.
    continent. 1.1 (2011): 60-67. At the beginning of Martin Heidegger’s lecture “Time and Being,” presented to the University of Freiburg in 1962, he cautions against, it would seem, the requirement that philosophy make sense, or be necessarily responsible (Stambaugh, 1972). At that time Heidegger's project focused on thinking as thinking and in order to elucidate his ideas he drew comparisons between his project and two paintings by Paul Klee as well with a poem by Georg Trakl. In front of Klee's (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23.  2
    Industrialist S. I. Maltsov as one of the pioneers of Russian industry of the second half of the nineteenth century.S. E. Ageev - 2017 - Liberal Arts in Russia 6 (2):194-202.
    The article is devoted to the history of development of Russian entrepreneurship in the second half of the 19th century. Sergei Ivanovich Maltsov was a well-known Russian industrialist. In the territory of the Kaluga region in the second half of the 19th century, S. I. Maltsov created a large industrial zone. The factories of the Maltsov industrial region produced railways, steam engines, steamships, locomotives, wagons, agricultural machines. In the town Dyatkovo, Maltsov’s plant produced unique crystal goods. In 1871 Maltsov built (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24.  14
    “I Always Watched Eyewitness News Just to See Your Beautiful Smile”: Ethical Implications of U.S. Women TV Anchors’ Personal Branding on Social Media.Teri Finneman, Ryan J. Thomas & Joy Jenkins - 2019 - Journal of Media Ethics 34 (3):146-159.
    ABSTRACTWomen television journalists have long faced criticism and harassment regarding their appearance. The normalization of social media engagement in newsrooms, where journalists are expected t...
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  25.  17
    “I Longed to Cherish Mirrored Reflections”: Mirroring and Black Female Subjectivity in Carrie Mae Weems's Art Against Shame.Robert R. Shane - 2018 - Hypatia 33 (3):500-520.
    Through staged photographs in which she herself is often the lead actor or through appropriation of historical photographs, contemporary African American artist Carrie Mae Weems deconstructs the shaming of the black female body in American visual culture and offers counter-hegemonic images of black female beauty. The mirror has been foundational in Western theories of subjectivity and discussions of beauty. In the artworks I analyze in this article, Weems tactically employs the mirror to engage the topos of shame in order (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26.  27
    Autonomous Vehicle Ethics: The Trolley Problem and Beyond.Ryan Jenkins, David Černý & Tomáš Hříbek (eds.) - 2022 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    "A runaway trolley is speeding down a track" So begins what is perhaps the most fecund thought experiment of the past several decades since its invention by Philippa Foot. Since then, moral philosophers have applied the "trolley problem" as a thought experiment to study many different ethical conflicts - and chief among them is the programming of autonomous vehicles. Nowadays, however, very few philosophers accept that the trolley problem is a perfect analogy for driverless cars or that the situations autonomous (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27. Entitlement and Rationality.C. S. Jenkins - 2007 - Synthese 157 (1):25-45.
    This paper takes the form of a critical discussion of Crispin Wright’s notion of entitlement of cognitive project. I examine various strategies for defending the claim that entitlement can make acceptance of a proposition epistemically rational, including one which appeals to epistemic consequentialism. Ultimately, I argue, none of these strategies is successful, but the attempt to isolate points of disagreement with Wright issues in some positive proposals as to how an epistemic consequentialist should characterize epistemic rationality.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   76 citations  
  28.  9
    A Skeptic's Reply to Lewisian Contextualism.I. T. Oakley - 2001 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 31 (3):309-332.
    A skeptic will from time to time make such claims as ‘We know nothing.’ Call this the skeptical use of the word ‘know.’ In apparent contradiction of the skeptic's claims, almost all of us firmly ascribe knowledge to ourselves and others. We use the word ‘know’ and its cognates frequently and fluently in largely untroubled communication with our fellows. We make judgments ascribing knowledge to ourselves and others. Furthermore, faced with the same situation and needing to make a judgment about (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  29.  2
    Uninvited: Talking Back to Plato.Carrie Jenkins & Carla Nappi - 2020 - Mcgill-Queen's University Press.
    Plato's Symposium depicts a group of men giving a series of speeches about the nature of love, with themes ranging from religion and metaphysics to medicine and pregnancy. The lone woman in the room, a "flute girl," is sent away as the discussion turns to serious matters; at the same time, the wisest of the men attributes his theories to a woman, the possibly fictional Diotima. Despite their absence from this important intellectual exchange, women are part of Symposium. What can (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30. Backwards Explanation.C. S. Jenkins & Daniel Nolan - 2008 - Philosophical Studies 140 (1):103 - 115.
    We discuss explanation of an earlier event by a later event, and argue that prima facie cases of backwards event explanation are ubiquitous. Some examples: (1) I am tidying my flat because my brother is coming to visit tomorrow. (2) The scarlet pimpernels are closing because it is about to rain. (3) The volcano is smoking because it is going to erupt soon. We then look at various ways people might attempt to explain away these prima facie cases by arguing (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  31. Boghossian and Epistemic Analyticity.C. S. Jenkins - 2008 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 22 (1):113-127.
    Boghossian claims that we can acquire a priori knowledge by means of a certain form of argument, our grasp of whose premises relies on the existence of implicit definitions. I discuss an objection to his ‘analytic theory of the a priori’. The worry is that in order to employ this kind of argument we must already know its conclusion. Boghossian has responded to this type of objection in recent work, but I argue that his responses are unconvincing. Along the way, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  32. Realism and Independence.C. S. Jenkins - 2005 - American Philosophical Quarterly 42 (3):199 - 209.
    I argue that mind-independence realism should be characterised in terms of what I call 'essential', rather than 'modal', independence from our mental lives. I explore the connections between the two kinds of independence, and argue that characterizations in terms of essence respect more intuitions about what realism is, harmonize better with standard characterizations of anti-realism, and avert the threat of subversion from Blackburn's quasi-realist.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   35 citations  
  33.  66
    Knowledge and Faith in Thomas Aquinas.John I. Jenkins - 1997 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book offers a revisionary account of key epistemological concepts and doctrines of St Thomas Aquinas, particularly his concept of scientia, and proposes an interpretation of the purpose and composition of Aquinas's most mature and influential work, the Summa theologiae, which presents the scientia of sacred doctrine, i.e. Christian theology. Contrary to the standard interpretation of it as a work for neophytes in theology, Jenkins argues that it is in fact a pedagogical work intended as the culmination of philosophical (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  34. What’s the Use of an Intrinsic Property?Carrie Figdor - 2014 - In Robert M. Francescotti (ed.), Companion to Intrinsic Properties. De Gruyter. pp. 139-156.
    Work on the intrinsic/extrinsic distinction is often motivated by its use in other areas, such as intrinsic value, real vs. Cambridge change, supervenience and other topics. With the exception of Figdor 2008, philosophers have sought to articulate a global distinction -- a distinction between kinds of properties, rather than ways in which individuals have properties. I argue that global I/E distinctions are unable to do the work that allegedly motivates them, focusing on the case of intrinsic value.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  35. Modal Knowledge, Counterfactual Knowledge and the Role of Experience.C. S. Jenkins - 2008 - Philosophical Quarterly 58 (233):693-701.
    In recent work Timothy Williamson argues that the epistemology of metaphysical modality is a special case of the epistemology of counterfactuals. I argue that Williamson has not provided an adequate argument for this controversial claim, and that it is not obvious how what he says should be supplemented in order to derive such an argument. But I suggest that an important moral of his discussion survives this point. The moral is that experience could play an epistemic role which is more (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   26 citations  
  36. Knowledge and Explanation.C. S. Jenkins - 2006 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 36 (2):137-164.
    Craig casts doubt upon the project of trying to give the traditional sort of necessary and sufficient conditions for A knows that p. He interprets the inadequacy of existing analyses of knowledge as evidence that our concept of knowledge is complex and diffuse, and concludes that we should aim to understand it by thinking about the rôle the concept plays in our lives, rather than by trying to find necessary and sufficient conditions for the truth of knowledge ascriptions.There is surely (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  37.  29
    Aristotle’s Criticism of Plato’s Republic.Joyce L. Jenkins & Robert Mayhew - 2000 - Philosophical Review 109 (3):425.
    Robert Mayhew’s Aristotle’s Criticism of Plato’s Republic focuses on Aristotle’s main objections to Plato’s political philosophy: the degree of unity envisioned by Plato is impossible/undesirable; too much unity undermines self-sufficiency; community of women and children and community of property have numerous adverse effects on society. Mayhew claims that the objections have been largely ignored on the ground that they are facile or unfair. But the purpose of the book is not to show that Aristotle’s thought has been unjustifiably vilified, though (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  38. Knowledge of Arithmetic.C. S. Jenkins - 2005 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 56 (4):727-747.
    The goal of the research programme I describe in this article is a realist epistemology for arithmetic which respects arithmetic's special epistemic status (the status usually described as a prioricity) yet accommodates naturalistic concerns by remaining fundamentally empiricist. I argue that the central claims which would allow us to develop such an epistemology are (i) that arithmetical truths are known through an examination of our arithmetical concepts; (ii) that (at least our basic) arithmetical concepts are accurate mental representations of elements (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  39. Hegel’s Concept of Desire.Scott Jenkins - 2008 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (1):pp. 103-130.
    Hegel’s assertion that self-consciousness is desire in general stands at a critical point in the Phenomenology , but the concept of desire employed in this identification is obscure. I examine three ways in which Hegel’s concept of desire might be understood and conclude that this concept is closely related to Fichte’s notions of drive and longing. So understood, the concept plays an essential role in Hegel’s non-foundational, non-genetic account of the awareness that individual rational subjects have of themselves. This account, (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  40. Nietzsche’s Questions Concerning the Will to Truth.Scott Jenkins - 2012 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 50 (2):265-289.
    By a will to truth Nietzsche understands an overriding commitment, unlimited in scope, to believing in accordance with evidence and argument. I show that the critique of this commitment found in Nietzsche’s later works uncovers the psychological grounds of our modern will to truth and establishes its affinity with distinctively moral commitments. I argue that Nietzsche’s critique nevertheless provides no answer to his question concerning the value of a will to truth in general. Nietzsche’s examination of the will to truth (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  41.  18
    Big Brother Goes to School.Ryan Jenkins, Zachary I. Rentz & Keith Abney - 2021 - Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology 25 (1):162-183.
    Few sectors are more affected by COVID-19 than higher education. There is growing recognition that reopening the densely populated communities of higher education will require surveillance technologies, but many of these technologies pose threats to the privacy of the very students, faculty, and staff they are meant to protect. The authors have a history of working with our institution’s governing bodies to provide ethical guidance on the use of technologies, especially including those with significant implications for privacy. Here, we draw (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42. The Nature of Normativity.C. S. Jenkins - 2009 - Analysis 69 (1):156-166.
    This is a big-picture book, 2 written with a breadth of focus which I find admirable. It exhibits what's come to be known as the ‘intersubdiscplinary’ approach to philosophy, which is not restricted by traditional boundaries within the discipline but rather proceeds with an eye to all sorts of areas of philosophy where relevant arguments, results, analogies and strategies might be lurking. I approve of this way of doing philosophy; it seems to me that all too often that wheels are (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  43.  98
    Sleeping Beauty: A Wake-Up Call.C. S. Jenkins - 2005 - Philosophia Mathematica 13 (2):194-201.
    This note concerns a puzzle about probability which has recently caught the attention of a number of philosophers. According to the current philosophical consensus, the solution to the puzzle reveals that one can acquire new information, sufficient to change one's credences in certain events, just by having a certain experience, even though one knew all along that one would have an experience which felt exactly like this. I argue that the philosophical consensus is mistaken.
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  44.  77
    Anti-Realism and Epistemic Accessibility.C. S. Jenkins - 2007 - Philosophical Studies 132 (3):525-551.
    I argue that Fitch’s ‘paradox of knowability’ presents no special problem for the epistemic anti-realist who believes that reality is epistemically accessible to us. For the claim which is the target of the argument (If p then it is possible to know p) is not a commitment of anti-realism. The epistemic anti-realist’s commitment is (or should be) to the recognizability of the states of affairs which render true propositions true, not to the knowability of the propositions themselves. A formal apparatus (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  45.  23
    Kant's Theory of Knowledge by T.I. Oizerman and I.S. Narskii: A Book Review. [REVIEW]V. S. Shvyrev - 1999 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 38 (3):90-96.
    A deep, unbiased study of I. Kant's intellectual legacy, which would decisively renounce the cliches and stereotypes we have formed, is today one of the most important tasks in the development of Russian philosophical culture. This is not merely because Kant is one of the key figures in world philosophy and, as Ia.E. Golosovker said, "regardless of whence and where a thinker was traveling on the road of philosophy, he would have to have crossed the bridge called Kant." To master (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  46. Amelioration and Inclusion: Gender Identity and the Concept of Woman.Katharine Jenkins - 2016 - Ethics 126 (2):394-421.
    Feminist analyses of gender concepts must avoid the inclusion problem, the fault of marginalizing or excluding some prima facie women. Sally Haslanger’s ‘ameliorative’ analysis of gender concepts seeks to do so by defining woman by reference to subordination. I argue that Haslanger’s analysis problematically marginalizes trans women, thereby failing to avoid the inclusion problem. I propose an improved ameliorative analysis that ensures the inclusion of trans women. This analysis yields ‘twin’ target concepts of woman, one concerning gender as class and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   87 citations  
  47. ‘I’M Not X, I Just Want Y’: Formulating ‘Wants’ in Interaction.Carrie Childs - 2012 - Discourse Studies 14 (2):181-196.
    This article provides a conversation analytic description of a two-part structure, ‘I don’t want X, I want/just want Y’. Drawing on a corpus of recordings of family mealtimes and television documentary data, I show how speakers use the structure in two recurrent environments. First, speakers may use the structure to reject a proposal regarding their actions made by an interlocutor. Second, speakers may deliver the structure following a co-interactant’s formulation of their actions or motivations. Both uses decrease the likelihood of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  48.  9
    A Letter From Berthollet to Blagden Relating to the Experiments for a Large-Scale Synthesis of Water Carried Out by Lavoisier and Meusnier in 1785.Denis I. Duveen & Herbert S. Klickstein - 1954 - Annals of Science 10 (1):58-62.
  49.  40
    Nietzsche's Use of Monumental History.Scott Jenkins - 2014 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 45 (2):169-181.
    ABSTRACT This article examines Nietzsche's notion of monumental history in “On the Uses and Disadvantages of History for Life” and considers its importance for Nietzsche's later work. In the first section, I examine the connections between monumental history and the work of Polybius, Thucydides, and Livy. Here I argue that Nietzsche takes his notion of monumental history directly from the practice of history in the ancient world. In the second section, I demonstrate that Nietzsche regards the production of illusions as (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  50. Review of C. S. Jenkins, Grounding Concepts: An Empirical Basis for Arithmetical Knowledge[REVIEW]Neil Tennant - 2010 - Philosophia Mathematica 18 (3):360-367.
    This book is written so as to be ‘accessible to philosophers without a mathematical background’. The reviewer can assure the reader that this aim is achieved, even if only by focusing throughout on just one example of an arithmetical truth, namely ‘7+5=12’. This example’s familiarity will be reassuring; but its loneliness in this regard will not. Quantified propositions — even propositions of Goldbach type — are below the author’s radar.The author offers ‘a new kind of arithmetical epistemology’, one which ‘respects (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
1 — 50 / 1000