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Carolyn P. Neuhaus [16]Carolyn Plunkett Neuhaus [2]
  1.  26
    Community Engagement and Field Trials of Genetically Modified Insects and Animals.Carolyn P. Neuhaus - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (1):25-36.
    New techniques for the genetic modification of organisms are creating new strategies for addressing persistent public health challenges. For example, the company Oxitec has conducted field trials internationally—and has attempted to conduct field trials in the United States—of a genetically modified mosquito that can be used to control dengue, Zika, and some other mosquito-borne diseases. In 2016, a report commissioned by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine discussed the potential benefits and risks of another strategy, using gene drives. (...)
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  2.  40
    A Radical Approach to Ebola: Saving Humans and Other Animals.Sarah J. L. Edwards, Charles H. Norell, Phyllis Illari, Brendan Clarke & Carolyn P. Neuhaus - 2018 - American Journal of Bioethics 18 (10):35-42.
    As the usual regulatory framework did not fit well during the last Ebola outbreak, innovative thinking still needed. In the absence of an outbreak, randomised controlled trials of clinical efficacy in humans cannot be done, while during an outbreak such trials will continue to face significant practical, philosophical, and ethical challenges. This article argues that researchers should also test the safety and effectiveness of novel vaccines in wild apes by employing a pluralistic approach to evidence. There are three reasons to (...)
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  3.  10
    Experiences at a Federally Qualified Health Center Support Expanded Conception of the Gifts of Precision Medicine.Johanna Tayloe Crane & Carolyn P. Neuhaus - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics 21 (4):70-72.
    In “Obligations of the Gift,” Lee argues that ethical thinking regarding return of genetic research results has been too narrowly focused on individual consent and participants’ “right to kn...
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  4.  15
    Public Deliberation about Gene Editing in the Wild.Michael K. Gusmano, Gregory E. Kaebnick, Karen J. Maschke, Carolyn P. Neuhaus & Ben Curran Wills - 2021 - Hastings Center Report 51 (S2):2-10.
    The release of genetically engineered organisms into the shared environment raises scientific, ethical, and societal issues. Using some form of democratic deliberation to provide the public with a voice on the policies that govern these technologies is important, but there has not been enough attention to how we should connect public deliberation to the existing regulatory process. Drawing on lessons from previous public deliberative efforts by U.S. federal agencies, we identify several practical issues that will need to be addressed if (...)
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  5.  47
    National Standards for Public Involvement in Research: missing the forest for the trees.Matthew S. McCoy, Karin Rolanda Jongsma, Phoebe Friesen, Michael Dunn, Carolyn Plunkett Neuhaus, Leah Rand & Mark Sheehan - 2018 - Journal of Medical Ethics 44 (12):801-804.
    Biomedical research funding bodies across Europe and North America increasingly encourage—and, in some cases, require—investigators to involve members of the public in funded research. Yet there remains a striking lack of clarity about what ‘good’ or ‘successful’ public involvement looks like. In an effort to provide guidance to investigators and research organisations, representatives of several key research funding bodies in the UK recently came together to develop the National Standards for Public Involvement in Research. The Standards have critical implications for (...)
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  6. Clarifying the Ethics and Oversight of Chimeric Research.Josephine Johnston, Insoo Hyun, Carolyn P. Neuhaus, Karen J. Maschke, Patricia Marshall, Kaitlynn P. Craig, Margaret M. Matthews, Kara Drolet, Henry T. Greely, Lori R. Hill, Amy Hinterberger, Elisa A. Hurley, Robert Kesterson, Jonathan Kimmelman, Nancy M. P. King, Melissa J. Lopes, P. Pearl O'Rourke, Brendan Parent, Steven Peckman, Monika Piotrowska, May Schwarz, Jeff Sebo, Chris Stodgell, Robert Streiffer & Amy Wilkerson - 2022 - Hastings Center Report 52 (S2):2-23.
    This article is the lead piece in a special report that presents the results of a bioethical investigation into chimeric research, which involves the insertion of human cells into nonhuman animals and nonhuman animal embryos, including into their brains. Rapid scientific developments in this field may advance knowledge and could lead to new therapies for humans. They also reveal the conceptual, ethical, and procedural limitations of existing ethics guidance for human‐nonhuman chimeric research. Led by bioethics researchers working closely with an (...)
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  7.  11
    Does Solidarity Require “All of Us” to Participate in Genomics Research?Carolyn P. Neuhaus - 2020 - Hastings Center Report 50 (S1):62-69.
    In this paper, I interrogate an ethical obligation to participate in genomics research on the basis of solidarity. I explore two different ways in which solidarity is used to motivate participation in genomics research: as an appeal to participate in genomic research because it cultivates solidarity and as an appeal to participate in genomic research because it expresses solidarity. I critique those appeals and draw lessons from them for how we ought to understand solidarity. The working definition of solidarity that (...)
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  8.  34
    Reevaluating Benefits in the Moral Justification of Animal Research: A Comment on “Necessary Conditions for Morally Responsible Animal Research”.Matthias Eggel, Carolyn P. Neuhaus & Herwig Grimm - 2020 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 29 (1):131-143.
    :In a recent paper in Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics on the necessary conditions for morally responsible animal research David DeGrazia and Jeff Sebo claim that the key requirements for morally responsible animal research are an assertion of sufficient net benefit, a worthwhile-life condition, and a no-unnecessary-harm condition. With regards to the assertion of sufficient net benefit, the authors claim that morally responsible research offers unique benefits to humans that outweigh the costs and harms to humans and animals. In this (...)
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  9.  7
    Threats to Benefits: Assessing Knowledge Production in Nonhuman Models of Human Neuropsychiatric Disorders.Carolyn P. Neuhaus - 2022 - Hastings Center Report 52 (S2):34-40.
    Recent reports and papers on chimeric research highlight the promise of chimeric models of human neuropsychiatric disorders to ameliorate human suffering due to autism spectrum disorders, depression, and schizophrenia. These calls, however, typically do not acknowledge, much less address, criticisms of model creation and validation, or concerns about scientific conduct more generally. The ethical justification for the use of nonhuman animals in research depends on the production of benefits to humans based on such research. But the assessment and production of (...)
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  10.  13
    Civic Learning for a Democracy in Crisis.Bruce Jennings, Michael K. Gusmano, Gregory E. Kaebnick, Carolyn P. Neuhaus & Mildred Z. Solomon - 2021 - Hastings Center Report 51 (S1):2-4.
    This essay introduces a special report from The Hastings Center entitled Democracy in Crisis: Civic Learning and the Reconstruction of Common Purpose, which grew out of a project supported by the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation. This multiauthored report offers wide‐ranging assessments of increasing polarization and partisanship in American government and politics, and it proposes constructive responses to this in the provision of objective information, institutional reforms in government and the electoral system, and a reexamination of cultural and (...)
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  11.  27
    Ethical issues when modelling brain disorders innon-human primates.Carolyn P. Neuhaus - 2018 - Journal of Medical Ethics 44 (5):323-327.
    Non-human animal models of human diseases advance our knowledge of the genetic underpinnings of disease and lead to the development of novel therapies for humans. While mice are the most common model organisms, their usefulness is limited. Larger animals may provide more accurate and valuable disease models, but it has, until recently, been challenging to create large animal disease models. Genome editors, such as Clustered Randomised Interspersed Palindromic Repeat, meet some of these challenges and bring routine genome engineering of larger (...)
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  12.  24
    Gene Doping—in Animals? Ethical Issues at the Intersection of Animal Use, Gene Editing, and Sports Ethics.Carolyn P. Neuhaus & Brendan Parent - 2019 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 28 (1):26-39.
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  13.  22
    Response to Open Peer Commentaries on “A Radical Approach to Ebola: Saving Humans and Other Animals”.Carolyn P. Neuhaus, Brendan Clarke, Phyllis Illari, Charles H. Norell & Sarah J. L. Edwards - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (1):W8-W9.
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  14.  22
    Altered Inheritance: CRISPR and the Ethics of Human Genome Editing.Carolyn P. Neuhaus - 2021 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 31 (4):27-39.
    What kind of world do we want to live in? It’s rare that we ask this question of ourselves, and even rarer that we get to do so with others. In Altered Inheritance: CRISPR and the Ethics of Human Genome Editing, Francoise Baylis encourages us to keep this question in the forefront of our minds as we think about whether, when, or how to edit the human genome. She is neither an “enthusiastic proponent nor a staunch opponent” of heritable human (...)
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  15.  3
    Cultivating Peace and Health at Community Health Centers.Carolyn P. Neuhaus - 2023 - Hastings Center Report 53 (5):13-16.
    Founded on a commitment to social justice and health equity, community health centers in the United States provide high‐quality primary care to underserved populations and address social drivers of health disparities. Through an examination of two books on the history of community health centers, Peace & Health: How a Group of Small‐Town Activists and College Students Set Out to Change Healthcare, by Charles Barber, and Community Health Centers: A Movement and the People Who Made It Happen, by Bonnie Lefkowitz, this (...)
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  16.  13
    Global bioethics.Carolyn P. Neuhaus - 2017 - Hastings Center Report 47 (6):inside front cover-inside front.
    This August, I participated in the conference “Genome Editing: Biomedical and Ethical Perspectives,” hosted by the Center for the Study of Bioethics at the University of Belgrade and cosponsored by the Division of Medical Ethics of NYU Langone Health and The Hastings Center. The prime minister of Serbia, Ana Brnabić, spoke of the significance of bringing together an international community of bioethicists, acknowledging that ethical, social, and legal issues surrounding gene editing technologies transcend national boundaries. Europe's Oviedo Convention prohibits human (...)
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  17.  14
    Personalized Medicine Is the Postgenomic Condition.Carolyn P. Neuhaus - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (3):46-47.
    When President Obama laid out his vision for the U.S. Precision Medicine Initiative in a 2016 Boston Globe op‐ed, he cautioned, “[I]t only works if we collect enough information first.” “Collecting information” is an apt way to describe the subject of both books reviewed here. Jenny Reardon's The Postgenomic Condition: Ethics, Justice, and Knowledge after the Genome traces the history of the Human Genome Project and efforts around the globe to obtain blood samples to extract not only genetic data but (...)
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