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  1.  29
    The Cultural Context of Patient’s Autonomy and Doctor’s Duty: Passive Euthanasia and Advance Directives in Germany and Israel. [REVIEW]Silke Schicktanz, Aviad Raz & Carmel Shalev - 2010 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 13 (4):363-369.
    The moral discourse surrounding end-of-life (EoL) decisions is highly complex, and a comparison of Germany and Israel can highlight the impact of cultural factors. The comparison shows interesting differences in how patient’s autonomy and doctor’s duties are morally and legally related to each other with respect to the withholding and withdrawing of medical treatment in EoL situations. Taking the statements of two national expert ethics committees on EoL in Israel and Germany (and their legal outcome) as an example of this (...)
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  2.  80
    The Cultural Context of End-of-Life Ethics: A Comparison of Germany and Israel.Silke Schicktanz, Aviad Raz & Carmel Shalev - 2010 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 19 (3):381-394.
    End-of-life decisions concerning euthanasia, stopping life-support machines, or handling advance directives are very complex and highly disputed in industrialized, democratic countries. A main controversy is how to balance the patient’s autonomy and right to self-determination with the doctor’s duty to save life and the value of life as such. These EoL dilemmas are closely linked to legal, medical, religious, and bioethical discourses. In this paper, we examine and deconstruct these linkages in Germany and Israel, moving beyond one-dimensional constructions of ethical (...)
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  3.  43
    Reclaiming the Patient's Voice and Spirit in Dying: An Insight From Israel.Carmel Shalev - 2010 - Bioethics 24 (3):134-144.
    In the latter half of the 20th century, Western medicine moved death from the home to the hospital. As a result, the process of dying seems to have lost its spiritual dimension, and become a matter of prolonging material life by means of medical technology. The novel quandaries that arose led in turn to medico-legal regulation. This paper describes the recent regulation of dying in Israel under its Dying Patient Law, 2005. The Law recognizes advance directives in principle, but limits (...)
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  4.  29
    An Ethic of Care and Responsibility: Reflections on Third-Party Reproduction.Carmel Shalev - 2012 - Medicine Studies 3 (3):147-156.
    The rapid development of assisted reproduction technologies for the treatment of infertility appears to empower women through expanding their individual choice, but it is also creating new forms of suffering for them and their collaborators, especially in the context of transnational third-party reproduction. This paper explores the possibility of framing the ethical discourse around third-party reproduction by bringing attention to concerns of altruistic empathy for women who collaborate in the reproductive process, in addition to those of individualistic choice. This would (...)
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  5.  28
    Human Germline Modification—A Missing Link.Gabriele Werner-Felmayer & Carmel Shalev - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics 15 (12):49-51.
  6.  19
    Dying of 'Old Age' in Israel.Mical Raz, Carmel Shalev & Sharon Amit - 2011 - The European Legacy 16 (3):363-375.
    This article examines the current state of end-of-life care in internal medicine wards in Israel, through an analysis of medical practice and the existing legal framework. The authors demonstrate the processes that lead chronically ill, elderly patients to perceive death as an unexpected phenomenon that is to be avoided at all costs. This perception stems, among other things, from the lack of public debate on questions relating to the end of life and the dominant cultural expectation that physicians provide curative (...)
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  7.  15
    Stem Cell Tourism—A Challenge for Trans-National Governance.Carmel Shalev - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (5):40-42.
  8.  8
    Joe Public V. The General Public: The Role of the Courts in Israeli Health Care Policy.Carmel Shalev & David Chinitz - 2005 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 33 (4):650-659.
    “One man’s ceiling is another man’s floor”Paul SimonThe words of Paul Simon capture the essence of what the courts are called upon to deal with when adjudicating matters of health. Wealthier and healthier neighbors living in the upstairs apartment are, all things being equal, not overly interested in raising the floor of their apartment in order to create more space for those in the apartment below. The floor is tangible, measurable and movable, and thus a subject where science can contribute (...)
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  9.  16
    Joe Public V. The General Public: The Role of the Courts in Israeli Health Care Policy.Carmel Shalev & David Chinitz - 2005 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 33 (4):650-659.
    “One man’s ceiling is another man’s floor”Paul SimonThe words of Paul Simon capture the essence of what the courts are called upon to deal with when adjudicating matters of health. Wealthier and healthier neighbors living in the upstairs apartment are, all things being equal, not overly interested in raising the floor of their apartment in order to create more space for those in the apartment below. The floor is tangible, measurable and movable, and thus a subject where science can contribute (...)
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  10.  1
    In the Throes of Revolution: Birthing Pangs of Medical Reproduction in Israel and Beyond.Carmel Shalev - 2018 - In Sayani Mitra, Silke Schicktanz & Tulsi Patel (eds.), Cross-Cultural Comparisons on Surrogacy and Egg Donation: Interdisciplinary Perspectives From India, Germany and Israel. Springer Verlag. pp. 327-349.
    This is a retrospective of surrogacy in Israel in the context of medically assisted reproduction. The practice of surrogacy emerged in the 1980s, suggesting a radical view of women as autonomous reproductive agents free from double standards of patriarchy. In 1995 Israel enacted a law that regulated domestic surrogacy for the benefit of infertile married women in accord with orthodox views of halakha. In recent years we see the growth of inter-country practices catering to otherwise ineligible intended parents, and a (...)
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