19 found
Order:
See also
Carla Rita Palmerino
Radboud University Nijmegen
  1.  26
    Infinite Degrees of Speed Marin Mersenne and the Debate Over Galileo's Law of Free Fall.Carla Rita Palmerino - 1999 - Early Science and Medicine 4 (4):269-328.
    This article analyzes the evolution of Mersenne's views concerning the validity of Galileo's theory of acceleration. After publishing, in 1634, a treatise designed to present empirical evidence in favor of Galileo's odd-number law, Mersenne developed over the years the feeling that only the elaboration of a physical proof could provide sufficient confirmation of its validity. In the present article, I try to show that at the center of Mersenne's worries stood Galileo's assumption that a falling body had to pass in (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  2. Galileo's Use of Medieval Thought Experiments.Carla Rita Palmerino - 2011 - In Katerina Ierodiakonou & Sophie Roux (eds.), Thought Experiments in Methodological and Historical Contexts. Brill.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  3.  45
    The Geometrization of Motion: Galileo’s Triangle of Speed and its Various Transformations.Carla Rita Palmerino - 2010 - Early Science and Medicine 15 (4-5):410-447.
    This article analyzes Galileo's mathematization of motion, focusing in particular on his use of geometrical diagrams. It argues that Galileo regarded his diagrams of acceleration not just as a complement to his mathematical demonstrations, but as a powerful heuristic tool. Galileo probably abandoned the wrong assumption of the proportionality between the degree of velocity and the space traversed in accelerated motion when he realized that it was impossible, on the basis of that hypothesis, to build a diagram of the law (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  4.  16
    Discussing What Would Happen: The Role of Thought Experiments in Galileo’s Dialogues.Carla Rita Palmerino - 2018 - Philosophy of Science 85 (5):906-918.
    Thought experiments play an important epistemic, rhetorical and didactic function in Galileo’s dialogues. In some cases, Salviati, Sagredo and Simplicio agree about what would happen in an imaginary scenario and try to understand whether the predicted outcome is compatible with their respective theoretical assumptions. There are, however, also situations in which the predictions of the three interlocutors turn out to be theory-laden. Salviati, Sagredo and Simplicio not only disagree about what would happen, but they reject each other’s solutions as question-begging (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  5.  4
    Infinite Degrees of Speed Marin Mersenne and the Debate Over Galileo's Law of Free Fall.Carla Rita Palmerino - 1999 - Early Science and Medicine 4 (4):269-328.
    This article analyzes the evolution of Mersenne's views concerning the validity of Galileo's theory of acceleration. After publishing, in 1634, a treatise designed to present empirical evidence in favor of Galileo's odd-number law, Mersenne developed over the years the feeling that only the elaboration of a physical proof could provide sufficient confirmation of its validity. In the present article, I try to show that at the center of Mersenne's worries stood Galileo's assumption that a falling body had to pass in (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  6.  52
    Gassendi's Reintrepretation of the Galilean Theory of Tides.Carla Rita Palmerino - 2004 - Perspectives on Science 12 (2):212-237.
    : In the concluding pages of his Epistolae duae de motu impresso a motore translato (1642), Pierre Gassendi provides a brief summary of the explanation of the tides found in Galileo's Dialogue over the Two Chief World Systems (1632). A comparison between the two texts reveals, however, that Gassendi surreptitiously modifies Galileo's theory in some crucial points in the vain hope of rendering it more compatible with the observed phenomena. But why did Gassendi not acknowledge his departures from the Galilean (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  7.  67
    The Isomorphism of Space, Time and Matter in Seventeenth-Century Natural Philosophy.Carla Rita Palmerino - 2011 - Early Science and Medicine 16 (4):296-330.
    This article documents the general tendency of seventeenth-century natural philosophers, irrespective of whether they were atomists or anti-atomists, to regard space, time and matter as magnitudes having the same internal composition. It examines the way in which authors such as Fromondus, Basson, Sennert, Arriaga, Galileo, Magnen, Descartes, Gassendi, Charleton as well as the young Newton motivated their belief in the isomorphism of space, time and matter, and how this belief reflected on their views concerning the relation between geometry and physics. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  8.  34
    Experiments, Mathematics, Physical Causes: How Mersenne Came to Doubt the Validity of Galileo's Law of Free Fall.Carla Rita Palmerino - 2010 - Perspectives on Science 18 (1):pp. 50-76.
    In the ten years following the publication of Galileo Galilei's Discorsi e dimostrazioni matematiche intorno a due nuove scienze , the new science of motion was intensely debated in Italy, France and northern Europe. Although Galileo's theories were interpreted and reworked in a variety of ways, it is possible to identify some crucial issues on which the attention of natural philosophers converged, namely the possibility of complementing Galileo's theory of natural acceleration with a physical explanation of gravity; the legitimacy of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  9.  14
    Motion to the Center or Motion to the Whole? Plutarch’s Views on Gravity and Their Influence on Galileo.Frederik Bakker & Carla Rita Palmerino - 2020 - Isis 111 (2):217-238.
    While it is well known that Plutarch’s De facie in orbe lunae was a major source of inspiration for Galileo’s Sidereus nuncius, its influence on his Dialogo sopra i due massimi sistemi del mondo, and especially on his views on gravity, has not been sufficiently explored. This essay offers the first systematic comparison of Plutarch’s and Galileo’s accounts of gravity by focusing on four themes: the thought experiment of a stone falling in a tunnel passing through the center of the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  5
    Pierre Gassendi: Humanism, Science, and the Birth of Modern Philosophy.Delphine Bellis, Daniel Garber & Carla Rita Palmerino (eds.) - 2018 - Routledge.
    Pierre Gassendi was a major figure in seventeenth-century philosophy whose philosophical and scientific works contributed to shaping Western intellectual identity. Among "new philosophers", he was considered Descartes’ main rival, and he belonged to the first rank of those attempting to carve out an alternative to Aristotelian philosophy. Given the importance of Gassendi for the history of science and philosophy, it is surprising to see that he has been largely ignored in the Anglophone world. This collection of essays constitutes the first (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  33
    Catholic Physics. Jesuit Natural Philosophy in Early Modern Germany.Carla Rita Palmerino - 2007 - Early Science and Medicine 12 (1):100-102.
  12.  17
    Geschichte des Kontinuumproblems or Notes on Fromondus’s Labyrinthus?Carla Rita Palmerino - 2016 - The Leibniz Review 26:63-98.
    In 1996, Manuel Luna Alcoba published a transcription of LH XXXVII, IV, 57 r°-58v°, a manuscript written by Leibniz after 1693 and containing historical and systematic reflections on the problem of the continuum. The present article aims to show that the manuscript, to which Luna Alcoba attributed the title Geschichte des Kontinuumproblems, consists mainly of excerpts from, paraphrases of, and comments on the Labyrinthus sive de compositione continui, a book by the Louvain philosopher and theologian Libert Froidmont to which Leibniz (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13.  27
    Thinking with Objects. The Transformation of Mechanics in the Seventeenth Century.Carla Rita Palmerino - 2008 - Early Science and Medicine 13 (2):212-214.
  14.  9
    Aggregating Speeds and Scaling Motions: A Response to Norton and Roberts.Carla Rita Palmerino - 2012 - Centaurus 54 (2):165-176.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15.  21
    Pierre Gassendi's Life and Letters.Carla Rita Palmerino - 2005 - Early Science and Medicine 10 (1):98-106.
  16.  7
    Exploring Thought Experiments: Michael T. Stuart, Yiftach Fehige and James Robert Brown : The Routledge Companion to Thought Experiments. Routledge: Oxon, New York, 2018, 567pp., USD$235.00 HB.Carla Rita Palmerino - 2019 - Metascience 28 (3):455-458.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17.  17
    Galileo Through French Eyes.Carla Rita Palmerino - 2008 - Metascience 17 (1):111-115.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18.  10
    Michael Elazar. Honoré Fabri and the Concept of Impetus: A Bridge Between Conceptual Frameworks. Xxix + 259 Pp., Bibl., Index. Dordrecht/New York: Springer, 2011. [REVIEW]Carla Rita Palmerino - 2013 - Isis 104 (1):162-163.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19.  8
    Consequentia Mirabilis: Una Regola Logica Tra Matematica E Filosofia. Fabio Bellissima, Paolo Pagli.Carla Rita Palmerino - 1998 - Isis 89 (4):715-716.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark