Results for 'Can Laurens L��we'

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  1. Trajectories of Mother-Infant Communication: An Experiential Measure of the Impacts of Early Life Adversity.Lauren Granata, Alissa Valentine, Jason L. Hirsch, Jennifer Honeycutt & Heather Brenhouse - 2021 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 15.
    Caretaking stability in the early life environment supports neurobehavioral development, while instability and neglect constitute adverse environments that can alter maturational processes. Research in humans suggests that different types of early life adversity can have differential effects on caretaker relationships and later cognitive and social development; however, identifying mechanistic underpinnings will require animal models with translational validity. Two common rodent models, maternal separation and limited bedding, influence the mother-infant relationship during a critical window of development. We hypothesized that these paradigms (...)
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  2.  13
    Aristotle and John Buridan on the Individuation of Causal Powers.Can Laurens Löwe - 2018 - Oxford Studies in Medieval Philosophy 6 (1).
    This paper examines Aristotle’s account of the individuation of causal powers, which dominated much of scholastic thought about powers, and argues that John Buridan rejected it. It contends that Buridan criticizes Aristotle’s account on two counts. First, he attacks Aristotle’s view that we ought to individuate powers by appeal to their respective activities. Second, Buridan objects to Aristotle’s “single-track” account, which correlates one type of power with only one type of activity. Against this, it is argued, Buridan adopts a multi-track (...)
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  3.  7
    Thomas Aquinas on Our Freedom to Use Our Habitus.Can Laurens Löwe - 2018 - In Nicolas Faucher & Magali Roques (eds.), The Ontology, Psychology and Axiology of Habits in Medieval Philosophy. Springer. pp. 167-184.
    This paper considers Thomas Aquinas’s claim that we can use certain habitus at will. Focusing on moral habitus, this claim is interpreted as a claim about the freedom human beings have with regard to their character traits: they can freely choose to act or not act according to their character traits. After giving a brief account of how, for Aquinas, character traits influence our actions via our emotions, the paper examines whether this freedom is of a libertarian or of a (...)
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  4.  13
    Science for Loss and Damage. Findings and Propositions.Reinhard Mechler, Elisa Calliari, Laurens M. Bouwer, Thomas Schinko, Swenja Surminski, JoAnne Linnerooth-Bayer & Kian Mintz-Woo - 2019 - In Reinhard Mechler, Laurens M. Bouwer, Thomas Schinko, Swenja Surminski & JoAnne Linnerooth-Bayer (eds.), Loss and Damage from Climate Change. pp. 3-37.
    This introductory chapter summarises key findings of the twenty-two book chapters in terms of five propositions. These propositions, each building on relevant findings linked to forward-looking suggestions for research, policy and practice, reflect the architecture of the book, whose sections proceed from setting the stage to critical issues, followed by a section on methods and tools, to chapters that provide geographic perspectives, and finally to a section that identifies potential policy options. The propositions comprise (1) Risk management can be an (...)
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  5. Zelfpredicatie: Middeleeuwse en hedendaagse perspectieven.Jan Heylen & Can Laurens Löwe - 2017 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 79 (2):239-258.
    The focus of the article is the self-predication principle, according to which the/a such-and-such is such-and-such. We consider contemporary approaches (Frege, Russell, Meinong) to the self-predication principle, as well as fourteenth-century approaches (Burley, Ockham, Buridan). In crucial ways, the Ockham-Buridan view prefigures Russell’s view, and Burley’s view shows a striking resemblance to Meinong’s view. In short the Russell-Ockham-Buridan view holds: no existence, no truth. The Burley-Meinong view holds, in short: intelligibility suffices for truth. Both views approach self-predication in a uniform (...)
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  6. In Defense of Convergent Realism.Clyde L. Hardin & Alexander Rosenberg - 1982 - Philosophy of Science 49 (4):604-615.
    Many realists have maintained that the success of scientific theories can be explained only if they may be regarded as approximately true. Laurens Laudan has in turn contended that a necessary condition for a theory's being approximately true is that its central terms refer, and since many successful theories of the past have employed central terms which we now understand to be non-referential, realism cannot explain their success. The present paper argues that a realist can adopt a view of (...)
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  7. How Can We Come to Know Metaphysical Modal Truths?Amie L. Thomasson - 2018 - Synthese 198 (Suppl 8):2077-2106.
    Those who aim to give an account of modal knowledge face two challenges: the integration challenge of reconciling an account of what is involved in knowing modal truths with a plausible story about how we can come to know them, and the reliability challenge of giving a plausible account of how we could have evolved a reliable capacity to acquire modal knowledge. I argue that recent counterfactual and dispositional accounts of modal knowledge cannot solve these problems regarding specifically metaphysical modal (...)
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  8. We Can Make Rational Decisions to Have a Child: On the Grounds for Rejecting L.A. Paul’s Arguments.Meena Krishnamurthy - 2015 - In Richard Vernon Sarah Hannan & Samantha Brennan (eds.), Permissible Progeny. Oxford University Press.
    L.A. Paul has recently argued that, on the standard model of rationality, individuals cannot make rational decisions about whether to have a child or not. In this paper, I show that Paul’s arguments do not plausibly demonstrate that the standard model of rationality precludes rational decisions to have a child. I argue that there are phenomenal and non-phenomenal values that can be used to determine the value that having a child will have for us and, in turn, that can be (...)
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  9. What Can Philosophers Learn From Psychopathy?Heidi L. Maibom - 2018 - European Journal of Analytic Philosophy 14 (1):63-78.
    Many spectacular claims about psychopaths are circulated. This contribution aims at providing the reader with the more complex reality of the phenomenon (or phenomena), and to point to issues of particular interest to philosophers working in moral psychology and moral theory. I first discuss the current evidence regarding psychopaths’ deficient empathy and decision-making skills. I then explore what difference it makes to our thinking whether we regard their deficit dimensionally (as involving abilities that are on or off) and whether we (...)
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  10.  44
    What Can We Take Away From Easy Arguments?Amie L. Thomasson - 2017 - Australasian Philosophical Review 1 (2):153-162.
    ABSTRACTA ‘sceptical’ approach to easy arguments involves reducing our confidence in the supposedly uncontroversial premise with which the arguments begin. Here I address the question: if we accept Yablo's new version of a sceptical proposal, what difference might that make for the relevant meta-ontological debates? I argue that serious difficulties remain for even this ‘best’ version of a sceptical approach. Noting these difficulties might motivate us to look again at the alternative strategy—of reading the uncontroversial premise straightforwardly and thinking that (...)
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  11. What Can We Know? An Introduction to the Theory of Knowledge.L. P. Pojman & N. Vassallo - 1996 - Epistemologia 19 (2):359-362.
  12.  4
    Can God Be Free?William L. Rowe - 2003 - Clarendon Press.
    Can God Be Free? is a penetrating study of a central problem in philosophy of religion: can it be right to regard God as free, and as praiseworthy for being perfectly good? Allowing that he has perfect knowledge and perfect goodness, if there is a best world for God to create he would have no choice other than to create it. But if God could not do otherwise than create the best world, he created the world of necessity, not freely, (...)
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  13. Can We Humanize Public Policy? - A Futures-Perspective.Warren L. Ziegler - 1985 - Dialectics and Humanism 12 (3-4):79-94.
     
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  14.  3
    What Can Cognitive Science Do for People?Richard W. Prather, Viridiana L. Benitez, Lauren Kendall Brooks, Christopher L. Dancy, Janean Dilworth-Bart, Natalia B. Dutra, M. Omar Faison, Megan Figueroa, LaTasha R. Holden, Cameron Johnson, Josh Medrano, Dana Miller-Cotto, Percival G. Matthews, Jennifer J. Manly & Ayanna K. Thomas - 2022 - Cognitive Science 46 (6):e13167.
    Cognitive Science, Volume 46, Issue 6, June 2022.
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  15.  34
    Doing the Best We Can: An Essay in Informal Deontic Logic. Fred Feldman.Thomas L. Carson - 1987 - Ethics 98 (1):177-178.
  16. How Something Can Be Said About Telling More Than We Can Know: Reply to Moore and Haggard.L. Hall, P. Johansson, S. Sikström, B. Tärning & A. Lind - 2006 - Consciousness and Cognition 15:697-699.
     
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  17. What Can We Learn From U.S. Military Nursing and COVID‐19?Robert L. Anders - 2020 - Nursing Inquiry 27 (4).
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  18.  8
    7T MRI and Computational Modeling Supports a Critical Role of Lead Location in Determining Outcomes for Deep Brain Stimulation: A Case Report.Lauren E. Schrock, Remi Patriat, Mojgan Goftari, Jiwon Kim, Matthew D. Johnson, Noam Harel & Jerrold L. Vitek - 2021 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 15.
    Subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation is an established therapy for Parkinson’s disease motor symptoms. The ideal site for implantation within STN, however, remains controversial. While many argue that placement of a DBS lead within the sensorimotor territory of the STN yields better motor outcomes, others report similar effects with leads placed in the associative or motor territory of the STN, while still others assert that placing a DBS lead “anywhere within a 6-mm-diameter cylinder centered at the presumed middle of the (...)
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  19.  19
    What Can We Learn From the Paradoxes? Part I.J. L. Mackie - 1971 - Critica 5 (13):85-108.
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  20.  6
    Can We Do Without Respect and Justice in Animal Research Ethics?Rebecca L. Walker - 2020 - Hastings Center Report 50 (5):46-47.
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  21.  13
    L'influence, entre science et fantasme.Stéphane Laurens - 2005 - Hermes 41:83.
    Les récents débats autour du délit de manipulation mentale amènent à s'interroger sur la notion d'influence et sur l'impact des recherches faites dans ce domaine. Ce délit repose sur l'idée que des techniques de manipulation efficaces existent et que par leur utilisation, on pourrait manipuler autrui. Suivant cette conception asymétrique de l'influence, la cible devient l'instrument du désir de la source et dans ce cas, il est nécessaire de se protéger de ces influences qui peuvent être néfastes. Si des travaux (...)
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  22. What Can We Learn From the Paradoxes? Part II.J. L. Mackie - 1971 - Critica 5 (14):35-54.
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  23. What Can We Learn From the Paradoxes?J. L. Mackie - 1971 - Critica 5 (14):35.
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  24. What Can We Learn From the Paradoxes?J. L. Mackie - 1971 - Critica 5 (13):85.
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  25. Can We Preach Philosophy?K. L. Brazil - 1968 - New York: Philosophical Library.
     
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  26.  89
    Characteristics of Physicians Receiving Large Payments From Pharmaceutical Companies and the Accuracy of Their Disclosures in Publications: An Observational Study. [REVIEW]Susan L. Norris, Haley K. Holmer, Lauren A. Ogden, Brittany U. Burda & Rongwei Fu - 2012 - BMC Medical Ethics 13 (1):24-.
    Background Financial relationships between physicians and industry are extensive and public reporting of industry payments to physicians is now occurring. Our objectives were to describe physician recipients of large total payments from these seven companies, and to examine discrepancies between these payments and conflict of interest (COI) disclosures in authors’ concurrent publications. Methods The investigative journalism organization, ProPublica, compiled the Dollars for Docs database of payments to individuals from publically available data from seven US pharmaceutical companies during the period 2009 (...)
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  27.  1
    L’Invisible Subjectivité au Cœur de la Personne : Que Faire du Déterminisme?The Invisible Subjectivity Within the Person: How Can We Deal with Determinism.Serge Lesourd - 2012 - Les Cahiers Philosophiques de Strasbourg 31:219-234.
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  28. What You Can't Expect When You're Expecting'.L. A. Paul - 2015 - Res Philosophica 92 (2):1-23.
    It seems natural to choose whether to have a child by reflecting on what it would be like to actually have a child. I argue that this natural approach fails. If you choose to become a parent, and your choice is based on projections about what you think it would be like for you to have a child, your choice is not rational. If you choose to remain childless, and your choice is based upon projections about what you think it (...)
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  29.  12
    What Can We Learn From the Paradoxes? Part II.J. L. Mackie - 1971 - Critica 5 (14):35 - 54.
  30.  1
    Can We Grant a Right to Place?David L. Imbroscio - 2004 - Politics and Society 32 (4):575-609.
    The author considers the plausibility of granting a “right to place” as an entitlement of citizenship in a nation such as the United States. Such a right would afford people the capacity to live in the places they choose. To explore whether granting such a right is plausible, the author identifies and examines the salient barriers now preventing Americans from choosing their place communities. The final section suggests that these myriad barriers, while formidable, are not insurmountable—a conclusion that, in turn, (...)
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  31.  10
    Can We Say When the Compensation of Social Differences has Been Just.O. L. Gonzalez-Castan - 1998 - Journal of Value Inquiry 32 (2):227-241.
  32. Can We Learn From Art?Iris Murdoch, Martha Nussbaum, Michael Norman & Susan L. Feagin - 1998 - In Carolyn Korsmeyer (ed.), Aesthetics: The Big Questions. Blackwell. pp. 178.
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  33.  54
    Animal Consciousness: How Can We Know? [REVIEW]Clive D. L. Wynne - 2005 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (12):562-563.
  34.  11
    Forever Young? The Ethics of Ongoing Puberty Suppression for Non-Binary Adults.Lauren Notini, Brian D. Earp, Lynn Gillam, Rosalind J. McDougall, Julian Savulescu, Michelle Telfer & Ken C. Pang - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (11):743-752.
    In this article, we analyse the novel case of Phoenix, a non-binary adult requesting ongoing puberty suppression to permanently prevent the development of secondary sex characteristics, as a way of affirming their gender identity. We argue that the aim of OPS is consistent with the proper goals of medicine to promote well-being, and therefore could ethically be offered to non-binary adults in principle; there are additional equity-based reasons to offer OPS to non-binary adults as a group; and the ethical defensibility (...)
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  35. Can God Be Free?William L. Rowe - 2002 - Faith and Philosophy 19 (4):405-424.
    Can God Be Free? is a penetrating study of a central problem in philosophy of religion: can it be right to regard God as free, and as praiseworthy for being perfectly good? Allowing that he has perfect knowledge and perfect goodness, if there is a best world for God to create he would have no choice other than to create it. But if God could not do otherwise than create the best world, he created the world of necessity, not freely, (...)
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  36.  77
    Doing the Best We Can: An Essay in Informal Deontic Logic.Fred Feldman - 1986 - D. Reidel Publishing Company.
    Several years ago I came across a marvelous little paper in which Hector-Neri Castaneda shows that standard versions of act utilitarian l ism are formally incoherent. I was intrigued by his argument. It had long seemed to me that I had a firm grasp on act utilitarianism. Indeed, it had often seemed to me that it was the clearest and most attractive of normative theories. Yet here was a simple and relatively uncontrover sial argument that showed, with only some trivial (...)
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  37.  7
    Why Can't We All Just Get Along? Integration Needs More Than Stories.Gordon M. Burghardt, Gregory L. Stuart & Ryan C. Shorey - 2014 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 37 (4):420-421.
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  38. Can We Relinquish the Transcendental?Catherine Malabou - 2014 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 28 (3):242-255.
    I borrow the terms of the title question from Quentin Meillassoux’s book After Finitude, which I intend to discuss here, a book that has provoked a genuine thunderstorm in the philosophical sky.1 “The primary condition to the issue I intend to deal with here,” Meillassoux says, “is ‘the relinquishing of transcendentalism’” . The French expression is “l’abandon du transcendantal.”2 I think that “the relinquishing of the transcendental” is better than “the relinquishing of transcendentalism.” As for relinquish, it implies something softer, (...)
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  39.  4
    Book Review:Can We Agree? Chauncey D. Leake, Patrick Romanell. [REVIEW]L. A. R. - 1953 - Philosophy of Science 20 (3):242-.
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  40. Unsettling the Coloniality of the Affects: Transcontinental Reverberations Between Teresa Brennan and Sylvia Wynter.Lauren Guilmette - 2019 - philoSOPHIA: A Journal of Continental Feminism 9 (1):73-91.
    This article interprets Teresa Brennan’s work on the forgetting of affect transmission in conjunction with Sylvia Wynter’s argument concerning the rise of Western Man through the dehumanization of native and African peoples. While not directly in dialogue, Wynter’s decolonial reading of Foucault’s epistemic ruptures enriches Brennan’s inquiry into this “forgetting,” given that callous, repeated acts of cruelty characteristic of Western imperialism and slavery required a denial of the capacity to sense suffering in others perceived as differently human. Supplementing Brennan with (...)
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  41.  20
    Why We Dance: A Philosophy of Bodily Becoming.Kimerer L. LaMothe - 2015 - Cambridge University Press.
    Within intellectual paradigms that privilege mind over matter, dance has long appeared as a marginal, derivative, or primitive art. Drawing support from theorists and artists who embrace matter as dynamic and agential, this book offers a visionary definition of dance that illuminates its constitutive work in the ongoing evolution of human persons. _Why We Dance _introduces a philosophy of bodily becoming that posits bodily movement as the source and telos of human life. Within this philosophy, dance appears as an activity (...)
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  42. Discussion: Fred L. Bookstein-My Unexpected Journey in Applied Biomathematics What Can We Do?P. Taylor - 2006 - Biological Theory 1 (2):179.
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  43.  6
    No More Bruises: What We Don’T Know About Domestic Violence Can Kill Us.C. L. Nash - 2019 - Journal for Peace and Justice Studies 29 (2):115-117.
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  44.  34
    Empowering Women Through Corporate Social Responsibility: A Feminist Foucauldian Critique.Lauren McCarthy - 2017 - Business Ethics Quarterly 27 (4):603-631.
    ABSTRACT:Corporate social responsibility has been hailed as a new means to address gender inequality, particularly by facilitating women’s empowerment. Women are frequently and forcefully positioned as saviours of economies or communities and proponents of sustainability. Using vignettes drawn from a CSR women’s empowerment programme in Ghana, this conceptual article explores unexpected programme outcomes enacted by women managers and farmers. It is argued that a feminist Foucauldian reading of power as relational and productive can help explain this since those involved are (...)
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  45.  35
    Must We Be Just Plain Good? On Regress Arguments for the Value of Humanity.L. Nandi Theunissen - 2018 - Ethics 128 (2):346-372.
    There is an argument according to which there must be something nonrelationally valuable for anything to be of value. The chains of dependence between values must come to an end, and humanity meets the specifications. I explore alternatives to terminating a regress in nonrelational value and give reason to reject the “borrowing” conception of relational value that drives the argument. I doubt that the nonrelational value of humanity can be secured by an argument from the structure of value, but I (...)
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  46. Toward a Phenomenology of Mood.Lauren Freeman - 2014 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 52 (4):445-476.
    Martin Heidegger's account of attunement [Befindlichkeit] through mood [Stimmung] is unprecedented in the history of philosophy and groundbreaking vis-à-vis contemporary accounts of emotion. On his view, moods are not mere mental states that result from, arise out of, or are caused by our situation or context. Rather, moods are fundamental modes of existence that are disclosive of the way one is or finds oneself [sich befinden] in the world. Mood is one of the basic modes through which we experience the (...)
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  47.  23
    Motivational Relevance as a Potential Modulator of Memory for Affective Stimuli: Can We Compare Snakes and Cakes?Christine L. Larson & Elizabeth L. Steuer - 2009 - Emotion Review 1 (2):116-117.
    Consideration of affective dimensions beyond arousal may be useful for a more precise understanding of the effects of emotional events on episodic memory. As highlighted by Kensinger (2009), the valence of an event may differentially impact the accuracy of its recall. Paralleling work on attention, we propose that the relevance of an event or stimulus for survival may also importantly modulate memory accuracy. However, few memory studies to date have accounted for motivational relevance, and the stimuli employed in most studies (...)
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  48.  68
    Stakeholder Theory, Fact/Value Dichotomy, and the Normative Core: How Wall Street Stops the Ethics Conversation. [REVIEW]Lauren S. Purnell & R. Edward Freeman - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 109 (1):109-116.
    A review of the stakeholder literature reveals that the concept of "normative core" can be applied in three main ways: philosophical justification of stakeholder theory, theoretical governing principles of a firm, and managerial beliefs/values influencing the underlying narrative of business. When considering the case of Wall Street, we argue that the managerial application of normative core reveals the imbedded nature of the fact/value dichotomy. Problems arise when the work of the fact/value dichotomy contributes to a closed-core institution. We make the (...)
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  49.  54
    Confronting Diminished Epistemic Privilege and Epistemic Injustice in Pregnancy by Challenging a “Panoptics of the Womb”.Lauren Freeman - 2015 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 40 (1):44-68.
    This paper demonstrates how the problematic kinds of epistemic power that physicians have can diminish the epistemic privilege that pregnant women have over their bodies and can put them in a state of epistemic powerlessness. This result, I argue, constitutes an epistemic injustice for many pregnant women. A reconsideration of how we understand and care for pregnant women and of the physician–patient relationship can provide us with a valuable context and starting point for helping to alleviate the knowledge/power problems that (...)
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  50.  48
    Are We Free to Break the Laws of Providence?Kenneth L. Pearce - 2020 - Faith and Philosophy 37 (2):158-180.
    Can I be free to perform an action if God has decided to ensure that I do not choose that action? I show that Molinists and simple foreknowledge theorists are committed to answering in the affirmative. This is problematic for their status as theological incompatibilists. I suggest that strategies for preserving their theological incompatibilism in light of this result should be based on sourcehood. However, the path is not easy here either, since Leibniz has shown how theological determinists can offer (...)
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