Results for 'COVID-19'

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  1. The covid-19 pandemic and the Bounds of grief.Louise Richardson, Matthew Ratcliffe, Becky Millar & Eleanor Byrne - 2021 - Think 20 (57):89-101.
    ABSTRACTThis article addresses the question of whether certain experiences that originate in causes other than bereavement are properly termed ‘grief’. To do so, we focus on widespread experiences of grief that have been reported during the Covid-19 pandemic. We consider two potential objections to a more permissive use of the term: grief is, by definition, a response to a death; grief is subject to certain norms that apply only to the case of bereavement. Having shown that these objections are (...)
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  2.  6
    Covid-19 Pandemic and the Freedom-Security Tension: Calibrating their Fragile Relationship.Pablo Martín Méndez - 2023 - Foucault Studies 35:192-210.
    Grounded in a will to adapt to dangers, and espouse both responsibility and resilience, voluntary measures have largely replaced one of the oldest public health strategies, quarantine. The Covid-19 pandemic, however, elicited a broad sweep of tactics from the archive of public health armoury. On a general level, this review essay addresses the common measures rolled out by various authorities against the pandemic - the lock-downs, reopening process, financial support and vaccination. By relating these measures to 1) the “plague-stricken (...)
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  3.  23
    COVID-19 and Health-Related Authority Allocation Puzzles.Michael da Silva - 2021 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 30 (1):25-36.
    COVID-19-related controversies concerning the allocation of scarce resources, travel restrictions, and physical distancing norms each raise a foundational question: How should authority, and thus responsibility, over healthcare and public health law and policy be allocated? Each controversy raises principles that support claims by traditional wielders of authority in “federal” countries, like federal and state governments, and less traditional entities, like cities and sub-state nations. No existing principle divides “healthcare and public law and policy” into units that can be allocated (...)
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  4.  60
    COVID – 19: A Critical Ontology of the present 1.Moulay Driss El Maarouf, Taieb Belghazi & Farouk El Maarouf - 2021 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 53 (1):71-89.
    COVID-19 has crowned1 a number of other disasters (wildfires in Australia, Desert Locusts in Kenya, an imminent WWIII merging Iran and the US), causing panic to click into place and horror to become our global predicament, making us realize that we live in the illusion of the permanence of things, of mastery, and of immortality. People’s turning to social media for trans-local news on COVID-19 has stirred great ire in the world. This led to the proliferation of dark (...)
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  5.  14
    COVID-19: Falling Apart and Bouncing Back. A Collective Autoethnography Focused on Bioethics Education.Katrien Dercon, Mateusz Domaradzki, Herman T. Elisenberg, Aleksandra Głos, Ragnhild Handeland, Agnieszka Popowicz & Jan Piasecki - 2023 - Canadian Journal of Bioethics / Revue canadienne de bioéthique 6 (2):76-89.
    The COVID-19 pandemic disrupted academic life worldwide for students as well as educators. The purpose of this study is to shed light on the collective adversity experienced by international medical students and bioethics educators caused by the COVID-19 pandemic in relation to both personal and academic life. The authors wrote their subjective memoirs and then analyzed them using a collective autoethnography method in order to find the similarities and differences between their experiences. The results reveal some consistent patterns (...)
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  6.  67
    Covid‐19: Ethical Challenges for Nurses.Georgina Morley, Christine Grady, Joan McCarthy & Connie M. Ulrich - 2020 - Hastings Center Report 50 (3):35-39.
    The Covid‐19 pandemic has highlighted many of the difficult ethical issues that health care professionals confront in caring for patients and families. The decisions such workers face on the front lines are fraught with uncertainty for all stakeholders. Our focus is on the implications for nurses, who are the largest global health care workforce but whose perspectives are not always fully considered. This essay discusses three overarching ethical issues that create a myriad of concerns and will likely affect nurses (...)
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  7. COVID-19 Vaccination Should not be Mandatory for Health and Social Care Workers.Daniel Rodger & Bruce P. Blackshaw - 2022 - The New Bioethics 28 (1):27-39.
    A COVID-19 vaccine mandate is being introduced for health and social care workers in England, and those refusing to comply will either be redeployed or have their employment terminated. We argue th...
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  8. COVID-19: Against a Lockdown Approach.Steven R. Kraaijeveld - 2020 - Asian Bioethics Review 13 (2):195-212.
    Governments around the world have faced the challenge of how to respond to the recent outbreak of a novel coronavirus disease. Some have reacted by greatly restricting the freedom of citizens, while others have opted for less drastic policies. In this paper, I draw a parallel with vaccination ethics to conceptualize two distinct approaches to COVID-19 that I call altruistic and lockdown. Given that the individual measures necessary to limit the spread of the virus can in principle be achieved (...)
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  9. COVID-19 vaccination status should not be used in triage tie-breaking.Olivia Schuman, Joelle Robertson-Preidler & Trevor M. Bibler - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 48 (10):1-3.
    This article discusses the triage response to the COVID-19 delta variant surge of 2021. One issue that distinguishes the delta wave from earlier surges is that by the time it became the predominant strain in the USA in July 2021, safe and effective vaccines against COVID-19 had been available for all US adults for several months. We consider whether healthcare professionals and triage committees would have been justified in prioritising patients with COVID-19 who are vaccinated above those (...)
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  10.  17
    Getting Through COVID-19: The Pandemic’s Impact on the Psychology of Sustainability, Quality of Life, and the Global Economy – A Systematic Review.Mogeda El Sayed El Keshky, Sawzan Sadaqa Basyouni & Abeer Mohammad Al Sabban - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11:585897.
    The COVID-19 pandemic may affect the world severely in terms of quality of life, political, environmental, and economic sustainable development, and the global economy. Its impact is attested to by the number of research studies on it. The main aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of COVID-19 on the psychology of sustainability, on sustainable development, and on the global economy. A computerized literature search was performed, and journal articles from authentic sources were extracted, including MEDLINE, (...)
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  11. COVID-19 calls for virtue ethics.Francesca Bellazzi & Konrad V. Boyneburgk - 2020 - Journal of Law and the Biosciences 7 (1).
    The global spread of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) or coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) has led to the imposition of severely restrictive measures by governments in the Western hemisphere. We feel a contrast between these measures and our freedom. This contrast, we argue, is a false perception. It only appears to us because we look at the issue through our contemporary moral philosophy of utilitarianism and an understanding of freedom as absence of constraints. Both these views can (...)
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  12. Amidst COVID-19 Pandemic: The Self-Efficacy and Academic Motivation of the College Students from the Private Higher Education Institutions in the Philippines.Micaiah Andrea Gumasing Lopez, Christian Dave Francisco, Cristalyn Capinig, Jhoremy Alayan, Shearlene Manalo & Jhoselle Tus - 2021 - Amidst Covid-19 Pandemic: The Self-Efficacy and Academic Motivation of the College Students From the Private Higher Education Institutions in the Philippines 7 (3):1-13.
    Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the academe was introduced to online education, which is complicated. The sudden shift of traditional face-to-face classes to digital learning impacted every student's self-efficacy and motivation towards their studies. This study investigates the relationship between the self-efficacy and academic motivation of the 304 freshmen college students from private higher education institutions in the Philippines. Based on the data gathered, the participants' level of self-efficacy (x̄ = 3.27) and academic motivation (x̄ = 5.93) is high. (...)
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  13.  4
    COVID-19 and Shame: Political Emotions and Public Health in the UK, by Fred Cooper, Luna Dolezal, and Arthur Rose. London: Bloomsbury, 2023.Penelope Lusk - 2024 - Journal of Medical Humanities 45 (2):201-203.
  14. COVID-19 and Intergenerational Justice: The Case of Denmark.Anne Lykkeskov & Ezio Di Nucci - 2022 - In Anne Lykkeskov & Ezio Di Nucci (eds.), The Global and Social Consequences of the COVID-19 Pandemic, Studies in Global Justice 22. Springer Nature, Switzerland. Studies in Global Justice 22. Springer Nature, Switzerland.
    We analyze Denmark’s COVID-19 containment policies. We argue that, despite the precautionary principle being explicitly appealed to by decision-makers at the highest political level, it is neither clear whether Danish COVID-19 policies did in fact constitute a genuine application of the precautionary principle, nor is it clear that the particular restrictions implemented ought indeed to count as precautionary when seen from a perspective that transcends the short-term emergency. Finally, we point at evidence suggesting that lock down policies had (...)
     
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  15.  1
    Africa’s Response to COVID-19 Pandemic and Guiding Ethical Principles.Workineh Kelbessa - 2022 - Bangladesh Journal of Bioethics 13 (2):7-23.
    This paper explores Africa’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic and some ethical principles that can be used to address the problem of COVID-19. The COVID-19 pandemic affects all human beings in the world, but not equally. Developing countries are more vulnerable to the COVID-19 crisis. Humanity should act collectively to deal with this crisis. It should search for both indigenous and modern medicines to combat the COVID-19 pandemic. Besides science and technology, humanity should adopt ethical (...)
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  16. Covid-19 katastrofa: Nad knihou Richarda Hortona.Daniel D. Novotný - 2020 - Filosofie Dnes 12 (2):88-127.
    In this review study, I reflect on Richard Horton’s book and his thesis that Western countries failed in their response to the current epidemic in the first half of 2020, with a few exceptions. In the five sections of the paper, after an initial modification of Horton’s thesis (A), I discuss briefly: the suppression approach in China (B), the mitigation approach in the West (C), the SARS epidemic as the key global public health event (D), the causes of Western failure (...)
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  17.  24
    COVID-19: Africa’s relation with epidemics and some imperative ethics considerations of the moment.Godfrey B. Tangwa & Nchangwi Syntia Munung - 2020 - Research Ethics 16 (3-4):1-11.
    COVID-19 is a very complex pandemic. It has affected individuals, different countries and regions of the world equally in some senses and differently in other senses. While sub-Saharan Africa has weathered a range of outbreaks of emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases, the manner in which the COVID-19 pandemic has evolved necessitates some observations, remarks and conclusions from our own situated observation point. Compared to previous epidemics/pandemics, many African countries have displayed a sense of solidarity in the face of (...)
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  18.  63
    COVID-19: Another Look at Solidarity.Matti Häyry - 2022 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 31 (2):256-262.
    Is there such a thing as corona solidarity? Does voluntary mutual aid solve the problems caused by COVID-19? I argue that the answer to the first question is “yes” and to the second “no.” Not that the answer to the second question could not, in an ideal world, be “yes,” too. It is just that in this world of global capitalism and everybody looking out for themselves, the kind of communal warmth celebrated by the media either does not actually (...)
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  19. Against COVID‐19 vaccination of healthy children.Steven R. Kraaijeveld, Rachel Gur-Arie & Euzebiusz Jamrozik - 2022 - Bioethics 36 (6):687-698.
  20.  15
    A Catholic Perspective on COVID-19.John J. Paris & Brian M. Cummings - 2024 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 33 (2):285-289.
    It took nearly two thousand years for society to recognize the Hippocratic insistence that “the doctor knows best”1 was an inadequate approach to medical decisionmaking. Today, patient-centered medicine has come to understand that the individual patient has a significant role in the decisionmaking process.2.
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  21.  32
    Covid‐19: Exposing the Lack of Evidence‐Based Practice in Medicine.Jonathan Reisman & Anna Wexler - 2020 - Hastings Center Report 50 (3):77-78.
    The Covid‐19 pandemic has altered the shape of medicine, making in‐person interactions risky for both patients and health care workers. Now, before scheduling in‐person appointments or procedures, physicians are forced to reconsider if they are truly necessary. The pandemic has thus thrown into relief the difference between evidence‐based medical care and traditional aspects of care that lack a strong evidentiary component. In this essay, we demonstrate how this has played out in prenatal care, as well as in other aspects (...)
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  22. COVID-19 Vaccination and the Right to Take Risks.Pei-hua Huang - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 48:534-537.
    The rare but severe cerebral venous thrombosis occurring in some AstraZeneca vaccine recipients has prompted some governments to suspend part of their COVID-19 vaccination programmes. Such suspensions have faced various challenges from both scientific and ethical angles. Most of the criticisms against such suspensions follow a consequentialist approach, arguing that the suspension will lead to more harm than benefits. In this paper, I propose a rights-based argument against the suspension of the vaccine rollouts amid this highly time-sensitive combat of (...)
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  23.  65
    The Covid-19 Pandemic: A Public Choice View.Panagiotis Karadimas - 2023 - Springer.
    This monograph evaluates public policy responses to the Covid-19 pandemic through a public choice lens. The book compares two prominent, albeit mutually exclusive, theories in social sciences—public interest theory and public choice theory—and explores how their predictions perform within the framework of the Covid-19 pandemic. The chapters present different pandemic policies alongside empirical data in order to draw conclusions about their efficacy, and, in turn, draw conclusions about the veracity of each theory. By the end of the volume, (...)
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  24. Full Throttle: COVID-19 Open Science to Build Planetary Public Goods.Rene Von Schomberg & Vural Ozdemir - 2020 - Omics: A Journal of Integrative Biology 24:1-3.
    this article makes the case that the rationale of open science and responsible innovation will help to build public planetary goods: the necessity of this rationale is illustrated on the COViD-19 case.
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  25. COVID-19 vaccine refusal as unfair free-riding.Joshua Kelsall - 2024 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy (1):1-13.
    Contributions to COVID-19 vaccination programmes promise valuable collective goods. They can support public and individual health by creating herd immunity and taking the pressure off overwhelmed public health services; support freedom of movement by enabling governments to remove restrictive lockdown policies; and improve economic and social well-being by allowing businesses, schools, and other essential public services to re-open. The vaccinated can contribute to the production of these goods. The unvaccinated, who benefit from, but who do not contribute to these (...)
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  26.  9
    COVID-19 and two sides of the coin of religiosity.Sergei V. Kolganov, Balachandran Vadivel, Mark Treve, Dono Kalandarova & Natalia V. Fedorova - 2022 - HTS Theological Studies 78 (4):7.
    Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) first appeared in China in late 2019 and since then it has become a pandemic. Various countries, in accordance with their cultures, have adopted different approaches to deal with the spread of this disease. The dimensions of this disease and its global spread are such that it will certainly have enormous effects on various aspects of human life for many years. One of these issues is examining the approach of religious countries in dealing with this (...)
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  27.  66
    COVID-19 as the underlying cause of death: disentangling facts and values.Maria Cristina Amoretti & Elisabetta Lalumera - 2021 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 43 (1):1-4.
    In the ongoing pandemic, death statistics influence people’s feelings and government policy. But when does COVID-19 qualify as the cause of death? As philosophers of medicine interested in conceptual clarification, we address the question by analyzing the World Health Organization’s rules for the certification of death. We show that for COVID-19, WHO rules take into account both facts and values.
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  28.  11
    Covid‐19, Free Exercise, and the Changing Constitution.Alexander Morgan Capron - 2021 - Hastings Center Report 51 (6):6-10.
    The Covid‐19 pandemic has brought bioethics back to five topics—justice, autonomy, expert authority, religion, and judicial decisions—that were central during its formative period but has cast a new light on each, while also tangling public health policy in the current, rather radical, reshaping of the role of organized religion in society.
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  29.  64
    COVID-19: where is the national ethical guidance?Richard Huxtable - 2020 - BMC Medical Ethics 21 (1):1-3.
    BackgroundAs the COVID-19 pandemic develops, healthcare professionals are looking for support with, and guidance to inform, the difficult decisions they face. In the absence of an authoritative national steer in England, professional bodies and local organisations have been developing and disseminating their own ethical guidance. Questions inevitably arise, some of which are particularly pressing during the pandemic, as events are unfolding quickly and the field is becoming crowded. My central question here is: which professional ethical guidance should the professional (...)
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  30.  5
    Towards a Notion of Relational Sacrifices: Nursing During the COVID-19 Pandemic in Wuhan.Shaoying Zhang & Derek McGhee - forthcoming - Ethics and Social Welfare.
    In this article, we examine the relationship between nursing and sacrifice in the context of Shanghai-based nurses volunteering to treat COVID-19 patients in Wuhan during the pandemic in 2019 and 2020. In the paper, we explore the relationship between metaphors, such as ‘the war on COVID’ with the notion of sacrifice among our participants. The contribution that this article makes is to examine the lived experiences of the sacrifices made by individual nurses in a wider ‘relational’ framework. This (...)
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  31. Covid-19 and the onlineification of research: kick-starting a dialogue on Responsible online Research and Innovation (RoRI).R. Braun, Vincent Blok, A. Loeber & U. Wunderle - 2020 - Journal of Responsible Innovation 3 (7):680-688.
    The COVID-19 crisis opened up discussions on using online tools and platforms for academic work, e.g. for research (management) events that were originally designed as face-to-face interactions. As social scientists working in the domain of responsible research and innovation (RRI), we draft this paper to open up a dialogue on Responsible online Research and Innovation (RoRI), and deliberate particular socioethical opportunities and challenges of the onlineification in collaborative theoretical and empirical research. An RRI-inspired ‘going online’ approach would mean, we (...)
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  32.  30
    COVID-19 and its Challenges for the Healthcare System in Pakistan.Atiqa Khalid & Sana Ali - 2020 - Asian Bioethics Review 12 (4):551-564.
    This article aims to highlight the healthcare issues raised by COVID-19 in Pakistan’s scenario. Initially, Pakistan lacked “standard operating procedures,” and the government had to ship testing kits from China and Japan. Moreover, due to violations of the lockdown and standard operating procedures (SOPs), the rapidly increasing number of cases created a burden on the healthcare system. More and more, this pandemic and its impact have grown. As vaccine development has not been successful yet, “herd immunity” can only be (...)
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  33.  36
    COVID-19 and Biomedical Experts: When Epistemic Authority is (Probably) Not Enough.Pietro Pietrini, Andrea Lavazza & Mirko Farina - 2022 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 19 (1):135-142.
    This critical essay evaluates the potential integration of distinct kinds of expertise in policymaking, especially during situations of critical emergencies, such as the COVID-19 pandemic. This article relies on two case studies: herd immunity and restricted access to ventilators for disabled people. These case studies are discussed as examples of experts’ recommendations that have not been widely accepted, though they were made within the boundaries of expert epistemic authority. While the fundamental contribution of biomedical experts in devising public health (...)
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  34.  71
    COVID-19 and consent for research: Navigating during a global pandemic.Ran D. Goldman & Luke Gelinas - 2021 - Clinical Ethics 16 (3):222-227.
    The modern ethical framework demands informed consent for research participation that includes disclosure of material information, as well as alternatives. The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic (COVID-19) results in illness that often involves rapid deterioration. Despite the urgent need to find therapy, obtaining informed consent for COVID-19 research is needed. The current pandemic presents three types of challenges for investigators faced with obtaining informed consent for research participation: (1) uncertainty over key information to informed consent, (...)
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  35.  28
    COVID-19 and beyond: the ethical challenges of resetting health services during and after public health emergencies.Paul Baines, Heather Draper, Anna Chiumento, Sara Fovargue & Lucy Frith - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (11):715-716.
    COVID-19 continues to dominate 2020 and is likely to be a feature of our lives for some time to come. Given this, how should health systems respond ethically to the persistent challenges of responding to the ongoing impact of the pandemic? Relatedly, what ethical values should underpin the resetting of health services after the initial wave, knowing that local spikes and further waves now seem inevitable? In this editorial, we outline some of the ethical challenges confronting those running health (...)
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  36.  20
    COVID-19 vaccine reviews on YouTube: What do they say?Da-Young Kang & Eyun-Jung Ki - forthcoming - Communications.
    After the Covid-19 vaccination started, social media users created an enormous amount of content on the vaccines. Especially in the early stages of vaccination, people searched and watched YouTube videos sharing personal experiences after getting the vaccines (i.e., vaccine review videos), usually titled “I got the COVID-19 vaccine.” Few studies have examined the characteristics and impacts of vaccine review videos on viewers’ responses (e.g., likes, dislikes, comments). This study investigates the content of, and reactions to, the most-viewed (...)-19 vaccine review videos on YouTube, based on the social communication framework. A quantitative content analysis of 148 vaccine review videos revealed their unique characteristics, including source expertise, message valence, narration, and topics. Most of the videos had a positive tone, with some urging vaccination and showing pro-vaccine attitudes. Furthermore, source expertise and hybrid message types (messages conveyed in narrative and informative ways) were not significantly related to positive responses. Rather, non-expert videos received more positive responses. The findings concern the public opinions surrounding new vaccines, including related concerns and attitudes. Given the positive tone of the content, vaccine review content made by diverse groups can be encouraged by public health institutions regardless of the creators’ expertise. (shrink)
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  37.  11
    The COVID-19 Crisis and Clinical Ethics in New York City.Kenneth M. Prager & Joseph J. Fins - 2020 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 31 (3):228-232.
    The COVID-19 pandemic that struck New York City in the spring of 2020 was a natural experiment for the clinical ethics services of NewYork-Presbyterian (NYP). Two distinct teams at NYP’s flagship academic medical centers—at NYP/ Columbia University Medical Center (Columbia) and NYP/ Weill Cornell Medical Center (Weill Cornell)—were faced with the same pandemic and operated under the same institutional rules. Each campus used time as an heuristic to analyze our collective response. The Columbia team compares consults during the pandemic (...)
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  38.  67
    COVID-19: A Boon or a Bane for Creativity?Maxence Mercier, Florent Vinchon, Nicolas Pichot, Eric Bonetto, Nathalie Bonnardel, Fabien Girandola & Todd Lubart - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
    In many countries, the COVID-19 pandemic led to a period of lockdown that impacted individuals’ lifestyles, in both professional and personal spheres. New problems and challenges arose, as well as opportunities. Numerous studies have examined the negative effects of lockdown measures, but few have attempted to shine light on the potential positive effects that may come out of these measures. We focused on one particular positive outcome that might have emerged from lockdown: creativity. To this end, this paper compared (...)
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  39.  13
    COVID-19 in the United States as affective frame.John Protevi - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 13.
    In this paper I attempt to contribute to the developing field of “political philosophy of mind.” To render concrete the notion of “affective frame,” a social situation which pre-selects for salience and valence of environmental factors relative to a subject’s life, I conduct a case study of a deleterious socially instituted affective frame, which, during the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States, produced individuated circumstances that came crashing down on “essential workers” who were forced into (...)
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  40.  35
    Covid-19 and the accelerating smart home.Robyn Dowling & Sophia Maalsen - 2020 - Big Data and Society 7 (2).
    Home, digital technologies and data are intersecting in new ways as responses to the COVID-19 pandemic emerge. We consider the data practices associated with COVID-19 responses and their implications for housing and home through two overarching themes: the notion of home as a private space, and digital technology and surveillance in the home. We show that although home has never been private, the rapid adoption and acceptance of technologies in the home for quarantine, work and study, enabled by (...)
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  41. COVID-19, gender inequality, and the responsibility of the state.Nikki Fortier - 2020 - International Journal of Wellbeing 3 (10):77-93.
    Previous research has shown that women are disproportionately negatively affected by a variety of socio-economic hardships, many of which COVID-19 is making worse. In particular, because of gender roles, and because women’s jobs tend to be given lower priority than men’s (since they are more likely to be part-time, lower-income, and less secure), women assume the obligations of increased caregiving needs at a much higher rate. This unfairly renders women especially susceptible to short- and long-term economic insecurity and decreases (...)
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  42. COVID-19: Approaching the In-Human.Jack Black - 2020 - Contours: Journal of the SFU Humanities Institute (10):1-10.
    What the COVID-19 pandemic serves to reveal is the inherent limitations and contradictions of a symbolic order that must now be perceived via an “impossible subjectivity”: what this essay will refer to as the “in-human.” (Zizek, 2020). Indeed, this in-human perspective transpires not through our fetishization of the virus, as some form of justification for humanity’s impact on the world, but from a position of impossibility that renders “the whole situation into which we are included.” (Monbiot, 2020; Zizek, 2020). (...)
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  43. Post-COVID-19: Education and Thai Society in Digital Era.Pattamawadee Sankheangaew - 2021 - Conference Proceedings 2.
    The article entitled “Post-COVID-19: Education and Thai Society in Digital Era” has two objectives: 1) to study digital technology 2) to study the living life in Thailand in the digital era after COVID-19 pandemics. According to the study, it was found that the new digitized service is a service process on digital platforms such as ordering food, hailing a taxi, and online trading. It is a service called via smartphone. The information is used digitally. Public relations, digital marketing, (...)
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  44.  48
    Consensus, Convergence, and Covid-19: The Role of Religion in Leaders’ Responses to Covid-19.Marilie Coetsee - 2023 - Leadership 13 (3):446-64.
    Focusing on current efforts to persuade the public to comply with Covid-19 best practices, this essay examines what role appeals to religious reasons should (or should not) play in leaders’ attempts to secure followers’ acceptance of group policies in contexts of religious and moral pluralism. While appeals to followers’ religious commitments can be helpful in promoting desirable public health outcomes, they also raise moral concerns when made in the contexts of secular institutions with religiously diverse participants. In these contexts, (...)
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  45.  28
    COVID-19, Moral Conflict, Distress, and Dying Alone.Lisa K. Anderson-Shaw & Fred A. Zar - 2020 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 17 (4):777-782.
    COVID-19 has truly affected most of the world over the past many months, perhaps more than any other event in recent history. In the wake of this pandemic are patients, family members, and various types of care providers, all of whom share different levels of moral distress. Moral conflict occurs in disputes when individuals or groups have differences over, or are unable to translate to each other, deeply held beliefs, knowledge, and values. Such conflicts can seriously affect healthcare providers (...)
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  46.  8
    The great leveller? COVID-19’s dynamic interaction with social inequalities in the UK.Melissa Dennison - 2021 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 43 (4):1-4.
    It has been claimed that the global pandemic is a ‘great equaliser’ that creates a sense of cohesion, however, this is problematic since COVID-19 has revealed the stark divisions in our societies. For instance, in the UK COVID-19 has hit northern cities particularly hard. Therefore, by focusing on the north of England, and Bradford especially, this paper offers suggestions which may help us see clearly through COVID-19, creating a future that is more equitable.
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  47. Amidst COVID-19 Pandemic: Depression, Anxiety, Stress, and Academic Performance of the Students in the New Normal of Education in the Philippines.Jhoselle Tus - 2021 - Online International Conference on Multidisciplinary Research and Development 1 (1):1-13.
    Studies on mental health and academic performance have been conducted throughout the world. Thus, this study aims to assess the students' mental health amidst the new normal of education employing 21-item Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale or DASS-21, concerning their academic performance. The study's findings showed that almost more than half of the respondents suffered from moderate to extremely severe levels of depression, stress, and anxiety. Thus, there was no significant relationship between high negative mental health symptoms and academic performance. (...)
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  48.  51
    COVID-19 and Contact Tracing Apps: Ethical Challenges for a Social Experiment on a Global Scale.Federica Lucivero, Nina Hallowell, Stephanie Johnson, Barbara Prainsack, Gabrielle Samuel & Tamar Sharon - 2020 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 17 (4):835-839.
    Mobile applications are increasingly regarded as important tools for an integrated strategy of infection containment in post-lockdown societies around the globe. This paper discusses a number of questions that should be addressed when assessing the ethical challenges of mobile applications for digital contact-tracing of COVID-19: Which safeguards should be designed in the technology? Who should access data? What is a legitimate role for “Big Tech” companies in the development and implementation of these systems? How should cultural and behavioural issues (...)
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    COVID-19 Shows the Need to Make Church More Flexible.Jerry Pillay - 2020 - Transformation: An International Journal of Holistic Mission Studies 37 (4):266-275.
    The COVID-19 challenge is unprecedented. It has caused enormous trauma, disrupted economies, social life, mass transportation, work and employment, supply chains, leisure, sport, international relations, academic programmes; literally everything. Churches and religious communities have not been spared; they have been severely affected and, in all likelihood, permanently transformed by the pandemic. The pre-COVID-19 world is gone, replaced by a ‘new normal’. The new landscape calls for both resilience and adaptation, embracing new ways of doing things and of being (...)
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  50.  38
    Politicizing COVID-19 Vaccines in the Press: A Critical Discourse Analysis.Ali Haif Abbas - 2022 - International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 35 (3):1167-1185.
    Undoubtedly and unfortunately, COVID-19 pandemic has been politicized in media see Abbas, Rui Zhang. Although vaccines play a crucial role in eliminating the pandemic, they have been politicized by media. This article aims to show how COVID-19 vaccines are politicized in the press. The article collects some selected reports on vaccines taken from American and Chinese media. The reports are analyzed according to an analytical framework suggested by the researcher. The framework and data collection and description are clearly (...)
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